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A board by jacob matthews

Medical Leadership and Management

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35 items · Last updated Saturday 21st March 2015
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how-to-win-friends-and-influence-people

 
dalecarnegie.com
over 6 years ago
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BL Leadership

We aim to engage students in the key issues facing the medical profession, as it evolves to meet the changing needs of the population.  
qmsu.org
over 6 years ago
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Barts Leadership Society

Barts Leadership Society. 259 likes · 5 talking about this. We are a brand new society, whose aim is to provide students the opportunity to develop their...  
Facebook
over 6 years ago
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Bristol Medical Leadership and Management Society - BMLM

Bristol Medical Leadership and Management Society - BMLM, Bristol, United Kingdom. 141 likes. The Bristol Medical Management Society is a brand new...  
Facebook
over 6 years ago
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Oxford Medical Leadership Forum / Oxford Medical Leadership Forum

The Oxford Medical Leadership Forum is proud to welcome Simon Stevens, Chief Executive of NHS England, who will speak about the future of the National Health Service.  
omlf.co.uk
over 6 years ago
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Education & Training | King's Health Partners | London

King’s Health Partners provides excellent education and training for healthcare professionals, students and support staff. Learn more today.  
kingshealthpartners.org
over 6 years ago
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SMLA

 
smla.org.uk
over 6 years ago
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SMLA.uk

A student society with an emphasis on medical leadership, management, safety and quality improvement  
Facebook
over 6 years ago
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p-Medical_Leadership_and_Managem-175.aspx

Since the publication of the Medical Leadership Competency Framework, a greater emphasis has been placed upon the leadership and management skills of doctors. Our CPD accredited management e-Learning course can be undertaken at your leisure and will help improve your personal effectiveness.  
radcliffelearning.com
over 6 years ago
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King's Student Healthcare Leadership Association

The SMLA is a society offering a one-stop-shop for learning, debate and discussion in themes relating to medical leadership, management, quality improvement and patient safety.  
kclsu.org
over 6 years ago
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Medical Management and Leadership Society

We will bring managers and consultants from all aspects of healthcare and beyond to give their insight into the role of leaders in future of the NHS as well as in managing large organisations. Through these events members can build a network of contacts, gain valuable leadership and managerial skills and gain a highly regarded boost to any CV.  
sgsu.org.uk
over 6 years ago
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SGUL Medical Management and Leadership Society

SGUL Medical Management and Leadership Society. 227 likes · 3 talking about this. Like this page to show your support for the new Medical Management and...  
Facebook
over 6 years ago
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Creating the Pre-Hospital Emergency Medicine Service in the West Midlands –The Inaugural lecture of the Birmingham Students Medical Leadership Society

Many thanks to everyone who attended the Birmingham Students Medical Leadership Society’s first ever lecture on November 7th 2013. The committee was extraordinarily pleased with the turn out and hope to see you all at our next lectures. We must also say a big thank you to Dr Nicholas Crombie for being our Inaugural speaker, he gave a fantastic lecture and we have received a number of rave reviews and requests for a follow up lecture next year! Dr Crombie’s talk focussed on three main areas: 1) A short personal history focussing on why and how Dr Crombie became head of one of the UK’s best Pre-Hospital Emergency Medicine (PHEM) services and the first post-graduate dean in charge of PHEM trainees. 2) The majority of the lecture was a case history on the behind the scenes activity that was required to create the West Midlands Pre-Hospital Network and training program. In summary, over a decade ago it was realised that the UK was lagging behind other developed nations in our Emergency Medicine and Trauma service provisions. There were a number of disjointed and only partially trained services in place for major incidents. The British government and a number of leading health think-tanks put forward proposals for creating a modern effective service. Dr Crombie was a senior doctor in the West Midlands air ambulance charity, the BASICS program and had worked with the West Midlands Ambulance service. Dr Crombie was able to collect a team of senior doctors, nurses, paramedics and managers from all of the emergency medicine services and charities within the West Midlands together. This collaboration of ambulance service, charities, BASIC teams, CARE team and NHS Trusts was novel to the UK. The collaboration was able to tender for central government and was the first such scheme in the UK to be approved. Since the scheme’s approval 5 major trauma units have been established within the West Midlands and a new trauma desk was created at the Ambulance service HQ which can call on the help of a number of experienced teams that can be deployed within minutes to a major incident almost anywhere in the West Midlands. This major reformation of a health service was truly inspirational, especially when it was achieved by a number of clinicians with relatively little accredited management training and without them giving up their clinical time, a true clinical leadership success story. 3) The last component of the evening was Dr Crombie’s thoughts on why this project had been successful and how simple basic principles could be applied to almost any other project. Dr Crombie’s 3 big principles were: Collaborate – leave your ego’s at the door and try to put together a team that can work together. If you have to, invite everyone involved to a free dinner at your expense – even doctors don’t turn down free food! Governance – establish a set of rules/guidelines that dictate how your project will be run. Try to get everyone involved singing off the same hymn sheet. A very good example of this from Dr Crombie’s case history was that all of the services involved in the scheme agreed to use the same emergency medicine kit and all follow the same Standard Operating Procedures (SOP), so that when the teams work together they almost work as one single effective team rather than distinct groups that cannot interact. Resilience – the service you reform/create must withstand the test of time. If a project is solely driven by one person then it will collapse as soon as that person moves on. This is a well-known problem with the NHS as a whole, new managers always have “great new ideas” and as soon as that manager changes job all of their hard work goes to waste. To ensure that a project has resilience, the “project manager” must create a sense of purpose and ownership of the project within their teams. Members of the team must “buy in” to the goals of the project and one of the best ways of doing that is to ask the team members for their advice on how the project should proceed. If people feel a project was their idea then they are far more likely to work for it. This requires the manager to keep their ego on a short leash and to let their team take credit. The take home message from this talk was that the days of doctors being purely clinical is over! If you want to be a consultant in any speciality in the future, you will need a basic underlying knowledge of management and leadership. Upcoming events from the Birmingham Students Medical Leadership Society: Wednesday 27th November LT3 Medical School, 6pm ‘Learning to Lead- Preparing the next generation of junior doctors for management’ By Mr Tim Smart, CEO Kings Hospital NHS Trust Thursday 5th December LT3 Medical School, 6pm ‘Why should doctors get involved in management’ By Dr Mark Newbold, CEO of BHH NHS Trust If you would like to get in touch with the society or attend any of our events please do contact us by email or via our Facebook group. We look forward to hearing from you. https://www.facebook.com/groups/676838225676202/ med.leadership.soc.uob@gmail.com  
jacob matthews
about 7 years ago
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Mr Tim Smart “Learning to Lead” - Birmingham Medical Leadership Society Lecture 2

Last Wednesday (27/11/13) was Birmingham Medical Leadership Society’s second lecture in its autumn series on why healthcare professionals should become involved in management and leadership. Firstly, a really big thank you to Mr Smart for travelling all the way to Birmingham for free (!) to speak to us. It was a brilliant event and certainly sparked some debate. A second big thank you to Michelle and Angie – the University of Birmingham Alumni and marketing team who helped organise this event and recorded it – a video will hopefully be available online soon. Mr Tim Smart is the CEO of King’s NHS Foundation Trust and has been for the last few years – a period in which King’s has had some of the most successive hospital statistics in the UK. Is there a secret to managing such a successful hospital? “It’s a people business. Patients are what we are here for and we must never forget that” Mr Smart doesn’t enjoy giving lectures, so instead he had an “intimate chat” covering his personal philosophy of why we as medical students and junior doctors should consider a career in management at some point. Good managers should be people persons. Doctors are selected for being good at talking to and listening to people – these are directly translatable skills. Good managers should be team leaders. Medicine is becoming more and more a team occupation, we are all trained to work, think and act as a team and especially doctors are expected to know how to lead this team. Again, a directly transferable skill. Good managers need to know how to make decisions based on incomplete knowledge and basic statistics. Doctors make life-altering clinical decisions every day based statistics and incomplete knowledge. A very important directly transferable skill. Good managers get out of their offices, meet the staff and walk around their empires. Doctors, whether surgeons, GP’s or radiologists have to walk around the hospitals on their routine business and have to deal with a huge variety of staff from every level. To be a great doctor you need to know how to get the best out of the staff around you, to get the tasks done that your patients’ need. Directly transferable skills. Good managers are quick on the up-take and are always looking for new ways to improve their departments. Doctors have to stay on top of the literature and are committed to a life-time of learning new and complex topics. Directly transferable. Good managers are honest and put in place systems that try to prevent bad situations occurring again. Good doctors are honest and own up when they make a mistake, they then try to ensure that that mistake isn’t made again. Directly Transferable. Even good managers sometimes have difficulties getting doctors to do what they want – because the managers are not doctors. Doctors that become managers still have the professional reputation of a doctor. A very transferable asset that can be used to encourage their colleagues to do what should be done. A good manager values their staff – especially the nurses. A good doctor knows just how important the nurses, ODP, physio’s and other healthcare professionals and hospital staff are. This is one of the best reasons why doctors should get involved with management. We understand the front line. We know the troops. We know the problems. We are more than capable of thinking of some of the solutions! “Project management isn’t magic” “Everything done within a hospital should be to benefit patients – therefore everything in the hospital should be answerable to patients, including the hospital shop!” “Reward excellence, otherwise you get mediocrity” At the present The University of Birmingham Students Medical Leadership Society is in contact with the FMLM and other similar groups at the Universities of Bristol, Barts and Oxford. We are looking to get in contact with every other society in the country. If you are a new or old MLS then please do get in touch, we would love to hear from you and are happy to help your societies in any way we can – we would also love to attend your events so please do send us an invite. Email us at med.leadership.soc.uob@gmail.com Follow us on Twitter @UoBMedLeaders Find us on Facebook @ https://www.facebook.com/groups/676838225676202/ Come along to our up coming events… Thursday 5th December LT3 Medical School, 6pm ‘Why should doctors get involved in management’ By Dr Mark Newbold, CEO of BHH NHS Trust Wednesday 22nd January 2014 LT3 Medical School, 6pm ‘Has the NHS lost the ability to care?’ – responding to the Mid Staffs inquiry’ By Prof Jon Glasby, Director of the Health Services Management Centre , UoB Thursday 20th February LT3 Medical School, 6pm ‘Creating a Major Trauma Unit at the UHB Trust’ By Sir Prof Keith Porter, Professor of Traumatology, UHB Saturday 8th March LT3 Medical School, 1pm ‘Applying the Theory of Constraints to Healthcare By Mr A Dinham and J Nieboer ,QFI Consulting  
jacob matthews
about 7 years ago
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Surprising places to find Medical Leadership

When I first started thinking about Medical Leadership and Management (MLM) it was because I like to see things work. When anything doesn't work, or something is inefficient or I think a system could be designed to make life easier - I get pretty annoyed. So, being irritated in things is what got me interested in MLM, but now it seems that I spend quite a lot of time thinking about MLM just because it is so ubiquitous. Almost any day you spend in hospital will involve you witnessing MLM on an almost minute by minute basis - even if you don't notice it! Recently, I have being working on a number of projects in my spare time (mostly out of interest but partly to secure those elusive foundation program points), which involved reading quite a few journal articles on a number of subjects ranging from the "trauma care" to "gastric banding". What surprised me was the prevalence of phrases like "....teams need greater training in medical leadership to improve patient outcomes..." or "...medical education needs to include greater emphasis of soft skills such as communication, team work and team leadership.." The profession's views on MLM have obviously been developing for a while, within the literature and now some organisations are really taking this ethos to heart, but it is still not a universal phenomenon. So, I thought it would be interesting to post this blog and start documenting random places where MLM is mentioned. If anyone reading this finds any surprising mentions then please do paste the link to the article in the comments section.  
jacob matthews
about 7 years ago
Quid big logo
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Quality Improvement Database

QuID's primary aim is to make it easier for good practice to be reported and shared. The secondary aim of QuID is to provide an educational experience for students and junior healthcare professionals by showing examples of projects that could be undertaken, offering advice and allowing individuals to practice submitting their work to a peer-review process.  
quid.org.uk
over 5 years ago