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286

Appendicitis | Radiology Reference Article | Radiopaedia.org

Appendicitis is inflammation of the vermiform appendix. It is a very common condition in general radiology practice and is a major cause of abdominal surgery in young patients. CT is the most sensitive modality to detect appendicitis.EpidemiologyA...  
radiopaedia.org
about 5 years ago
12
1
260

Radiology Masterclass - Abdomen X-ray tutorials - Abnormal bowel gas pattern - Free gas - pneumoperitoneum

Learn about abdomen x-ray abnormalities. Tutorial on abnormalities of the bowel gas pattern on abdominal x-ray. Free gas - pneumoperitoneum. Double wall - Rigler's sign - description. Football sign - description.  
radiologymasterclass.co.uk
about 5 years ago
Preview
1
18

Abdominal Examination for OSCE Revision

Constructive feedback is always appreciated  
YouTube
about 5 years ago
Preview
1
7

ANATOMY; MUSCLES OF THE VERTEBRAL COLUMN; SPLENIUS, ABDOMINAL & ERECTOR SPINAE by Professor Fink

This is Part 2 of 5 Video Lectures on the Skeletal Muscle Groups of the Human Body by Professor Fink. In this Video Lecture, Professor Fink describes the Mus...  
YouTube
about 5 years ago
Preview
1
85

Chapter 53: Kidney and Abdominal Ureter

Section 4 Subspecialty Management Partial Pressure of Carbon Dioxide Management Chapter 53 Anesthesia and the Renal and Genitourinary Systems  
web.squ.edu.om
almost 5 years ago
Preview
3
69

The Complete Guide to Vascular Ultrasound

This volume is a comprehensive how-to guide to ultrasound evaluation of vascular pathology. The book provides both the technical know-how and the analytical skills needed to obtain the maximum information from examinations and to accurately diagnose a given problem. Chapters provide detailed coverage of abdominal vasculature, peripheral arteries, hemodialysis and bypass grafts, peripheral veins, penile vessels, and the cerebrovascular system. Each chapter includes sections on anatomy, pathology, questions to ask the patient, examination techniques, diagnostic analysis, and other diagnostic tests related to the clinical problem. More than 100 full-color Doppler images demonstrate the full spectrum of pathologic findings.  
Google Books
almost 5 years ago
5
1
37

Oceania University of Medicine - Medical Student: April 2014

"A blog by a non traditional medical sciences student"  
myroadtomedicalschool.blogspot.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
1
25

An unexpected finding after a fall from a horse

A 37 year old jockey was admitted with left sided abdominal pain and fullness one week after a fall from a horse. Before this he had been fit and well. On examination, he was tender in the left upper outer quadrant of his abdomen and his blood pressure was 90/55 mm Hg. A computed tomography scan showed an area of active bleeding in the parenchyma of the spleen and a large subcapsular haematoma.  
bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
20

An unusual finding on a pelvic radiograph

A 74 year old man presented to the ear, nose, and throat department with breathlessness on exertion, intermittent voice hoarseness, and a sensation of catarrh in his throat. After a laryngoscopy with biopsy was performed, he was diagnosed as having a low grade chondrosarcoma of the larynx. Before surgical debulking of the lesion was carried out he underwent computed tomography of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. This confirmed the presence of a subglottic mass in the larynx but also showed a mixed lytic and sclerotic expansile lesion (5.8 cm (longitudinal)×1.6 cm (axial)×4.5 cm) in the left iliac blade of the pelvis. The pelvic lesion was well corticated, with internal ossified septae and calcification. Expansion of the left iliac wing was noted, with no breach in the cortex.  
bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
11

A persisting puzzling pneumonia in a young man

A 23 year old immunocompetent man with a history of childhood asthma was referred to the respiratory physicians with a four week history of productive cough, painful throat, fever, rigors, generalised myalgia, and vague discomfort in his left chest. He also had slight abdominal tenderness in the left upper quadrant.  
bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
0
0
60

How can you see a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm on abdominal x-ray?

I was was listening to a vascular surgeon, who mentioned that there was an indication of a partially ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm see on an abdominal x-ray. I have no idea how he saw this or what to look for. Can anyone give me some hints please?  
Rebecca Stafford
about 7 years ago
4
0
11

Prostate Cancer or BPH?

Just seen this Q and can't work out the answer... 76 year old man, comes with abdominal distension pain and hydronephrosis. Increase urea and creatinine on investigation. What is the diagnosis? Anyone?  
Ricky Rimmer
over 6 years ago
9
1
34

Surgery Mock MCQ

An obese 63 year old lady presents with jaundice. There is no history of abdominal pain. Examination of her abdomen reveals a palpable gall bladder. There is evidence of extensive pruritis. She tells you she drinks 42 units of alcohol a week. Her blood results are as follows: Albumin 32 (35-50) Alk Phos 456 (<110) ALT 88 (<40) Bilirubin 120 (<20) INR 1.6 GGT 400 (0-70) What’s the most likely diagnosis? a. Gallstones b. Paracetamol Overdose c. Pancreatic cancer d. Alcoholic Hepatitis e. Primary billiary cirrhosis  
Af Del
almost 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 e7fpn8?1444774293
3
339

The Importance Of Clinical Skills

In the USA the issue of indiscriminate use of expensive, sophisticated, and time consuming test in lieu of, rather than in addition to, the clinical exam is being much discussed. The cause of this problem is of course multifactorial. One of the factors is the decline of the teaching of clinical skills to our medical students and trainees. Such problems seem to have taken hold in developing countries as well. Two personal anecdotes will illustrate this. In the early nineties I worked for two years as a faculty member in the department of ob & gyn at the Aga Khan University Medical School in Karachi, Pakistan. One day, I received a call from the resident in the emergency room about a woman who had come in because of some abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding. While the resident told me these two symptoms her next sentence was: “… and the pelvic ultrasound showed…” I stopped her right in her tracks before she could tell me the result of the ultrasound scan. I told her: “First tell me more about this patient. Does she look ill? Is she bleeding heavily? Is she in a lot of pain and where is the pain? What are her blood pressure and pulse rate? How long has she been having these symptoms? When was her last menstrual period? What are your findings when you examined her ? What is the result of the pregnancy test?”. The resident could not answer most of these basic clinical questions and findings. She had proceeded straight to a test which might or might not have been necessary or even indicated and she was not using her clinical skills or judgment. In another example, the resident, also in Karachi, called me to the emergency room about a patient with a ruptured ectopic pregnancy. He told me that the patient was pale, and obviously bleeding inside her abdomen and on the verge of going into shock. The resident had accurately made the diagnosis, based on the patient’s history, examination, and a few basic laboratory tests. But when I ran down to see the patient, he was wheeling the patient into the radiology department for an ultrasound. "Why an ultrasound?" I asked. “You already have made the correct diagnosis and she needs an urgent operation not another diagnostic procedure that will take up precious time before we can stop the internal bleeding.” Instead of having the needless ultrasound, the patient was wheeled into the operating room. What I am trying to emphasize is that advances in technology are great but they need to be used judiciously and young medical students and trainees need to be taught to use their clinical skills first and then apply new technologies, if needed, to help them to come to the right diagnosis and treatment. And of course we, practicing physicians need to set the example. Or am I old fashioned and not with it? Medico legal and other issues may come to play here and I am fully aware of these. However the basic issue of clinical exam is still important. Those wanting to read more similar stories can download a free e book from Smashwords. The title is: "CROSSCULTURAL DOCTORING. ON AND OFF THE BEATEN PATH." You can access the e book here.  
DR William LeMaire
over 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 bpq0mk?1444774302
2
439

Clinical Exam Still Matters

After I retired from my academic position at the University of Miami, I started working as an intermittent ob & gyn in various cultural settings in the US and abroad. In 2006 I practiced in a hospital in New Zealand. I saw many interesting cases during my six months at Whangarei Hospital. One stands out in particular. This was a middle aged native Mauri woman who had been seeing her family doctor for several years because she was gaining too much weight, her abdomen was getting bigger, and she was constipated. Each time the family doctor saw her, he did not examine her but patted her on the back and encouraged her to eat less, eat more fruit and vegetables and be more active so that she would lose weight. When much later he finally examined her, he noticed a large tumor in her abdomen and referred her to the hospital. To make a long story short, we operated on her and removed a large ovarian cyst weighing more than 18 kilograms (about 40 pounds). This cyst fortunately turned out to be benign and the woman did well. The operation itself was something else as we needed an extra assistant to hold the tumor in her arms while we removed it without breaking it. Even though this large tumor was certainly not a record, we ended up publishing the case in a New Zealaned medical journal for family practice (see reference below), not so much for the nature of the tumor itself as for pointing out to family doctors (all doctors, in fact) that examining patients before giving them advice is most important. Alison Gale, Tommy Cobb, Robert Norelli, William LeMaire. Increasing Abdominal Girth. The Importance of Clinical Examination. New Zealand Family Physician. 2006; 33 (4): 250-252  
DR William LeMaire
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
0
12

An unexpected finding after a fall from a horse

A 37 year old jockey was admitted with left sided abdominal pain and fullness one week after a fall from a horse. Before this he had been fit and well. On examination, he was tender in the left upper outer quadrant of his abdomen and his blood pressure was 90/55 mm Hg. A computed tomography scan showed an area of active bleeding in the parenchyma of the spleen and a large subcapsular haematoma.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
0
15

An unusual finding on a pelvic radiograph

A 74 year old man presented to the ear, nose, and throat department with breathlessness on exertion, intermittent voice hoarseness, and a sensation of catarrh in his throat. After a laryngoscopy with biopsy was performed, he was diagnosed as having a low grade chondrosarcoma of the larynx. Before surgical debulking of the lesion was carried out he underwent computed tomography of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. This confirmed the presence of a subglottic mass in the larynx but also showed a mixed lytic and sclerotic expansile lesion (5.8 cm (longitudinal)×1.6 cm (axial)×4.5 cm) in the left iliac blade of the pelvis. The pelvic lesion was well corticated, with internal ossified septae and calcification. Expansion of the left iliac wing was noted, with no breach in the cortex.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
0
8

A persisting puzzling pneumonia in a young man

A 23 year old immunocompetent man with a history of childhood asthma was referred to the respiratory physicians with a four week history of productive cough, painful throat, fever, rigors, generalised myalgia, and vague discomfort in his left chest. He also had slight abdominal tenderness in the left upper quadrant.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago