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HOUJC1 2009 | Case 1

ResearchToPractice.com/HOUJC109 – Case 1: 73yo woman with recurrent, fludarabine-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia with lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly and anemia. Interviews conducted by Neil Love, MD. Produced by Research To Practice.  
Dr Neil Love
over 9 years ago
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384

Summary of blood

This is a summary of blood, from anaemia, blood matching, blood clotting, blood cell changes with different conditions.  
Philip Welsby
over 8 years ago
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178

B Vitamins Mnemonic: Metabolic deficiencies- Water and Fat Soluable Cofactors Tutorial

A mnemonic for B vitamins - convoluted, but it's better than brute force memorization. Please SUBSCRIBE for new videos: More cool stuff coming as we get more Hippo Helpers! Pathology tutorial playlist at: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLIPkjUW-piR2HEbxFVzJ-jIH0TxcBrc_K In addition to a quick introduction to B1, B2, B3, B4, B5, B6 and B12, there are keywords at the end for fat-soluble vitamin A, D, E, and K. PS: Cobalamin is intentionally mispronounced as "Cobalbumin" - it helps remember the anemia association, like how "Albumin" is in the blood :) Visit: http://helphippo.com for archived videos, organized by topic/school year.  
HelpHippo.com
almost 6 years ago
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476

Easy Anemia Classification: Introduction for Medical Pathology Students

A simplified introduction to anemia pathology, including iron deficiency, lead poisoning, vitamins, DNA. We classify anemias according to red blood cell size; environmental or genetic causes. Please SUBSCRIBE for new videos: More cool stuff coming as we get more users. Pathology mnemonic tutorial playlist at: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLIPkjUW-piR2HEbxFVzJ-jIH0TxcBrc_K BTW: I say "Gap6" instead of "G6PD" because there is a "gap" in the RBC membrane where a "bite" was taken out. (Mnemonic for abnormal cell morphology for this enzyme deficiency.) G6PD shows "High Loss" during a crisis, (like after eating fava beans...) but most of the time, your (asymptomatic) RBCs are just born with defective glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Visit: http://helphippo.com for archived videos, organized by topic/school year.  
HelpHippo.com
almost 6 years ago
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56

Anaemia of Chronic Disease

This is common, particularly in the hospital setting. It occurs as a result of: Chronic infection Chronic inflammation Neoplasia The anaemia is not related to bone marrow, bleeding or haemolysis, and is generally mild (Hb of 8.5-11.5g/dl).  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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87

Causes of Splenomegaly

"CHICAGO" C – Cancer H – Haematological malignancies – anaemia, leukaemia, lymphoma, I – Infection (CMV, HEP, HIV, TB, parasitic (malaria)). EBV is the most common community acquired Inflammation – sarcoid, amyloid C – Congestion; portal hypertension  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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95

Anaemia - Pathology / Disease | Fastbleep

Fastbleep offers the opportunity to support a growing social network of healthcare students and educators as they consider patient care, undertake professional development and share knowledge.  
fastbleep.com
over 5 years ago
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3
259

Anemia: Pathophysiology, Classification, Clinical Investigation

The pathophysiology of anemia and the basis of its clinical investigation  
web2.airmail.net
over 5 years ago
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46

A student with macrocytic anaemia

A 22 year old university student presented to hospital with syncope shortly before submitting her final dissertation. She had a two month history of tiredness and breathlessness on minimal exertion. She denied menorrhagia. Her medical history and family history were unremarkable. She had a non-vegetarian diet, mainly based on carbohydrates, and she drank alcohol only occasionally.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
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Internal medicine on Instagram: “Peripheral blood smear from a patient with a microangiopathic hemolytic anemia with marked red cell fragmentation. The smear shows multiple…”

“Peripheral blood smear from a patient with a microangiopathic hemolytic anemia with marked red cell fragmentation. The smear shows multiple helmet cells…”  
Instagram
over 5 years ago
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121

Hemolytic Anemias

Introduction to hemolytic anemia  
web2.airmail.net
almost 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
30

An abnormality at the hepatic flexure

A 92 year old woman presented to the emergency department after collapsing at home. She recalled standing from her chair, feeling lightheaded, and then collapsing. She had felt generally weak for more than a year, with weight loss of 56 lb (25.2 kg) but no change in bowel habit, dysphagia, or gastrointestinal bleeding. Her medical history included hypertension, hypothyroidism, and anaemia (which was currently being investigated by her general practitioner). Among other drugs, she was taking lisinopril, bendroflumethiazide, and levothyroxine. Her son had died at 60 years of age from large bowel obstruction and perforation secondary to colon cancer.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
5
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How does acute renal failure cause anemia?

How do the two relate to each other? Is the anemia hemolytic, or hypovolemic? Is it the presence of hematuria that causes anemia, could it be severe enough to do so?  
Aerosus 2
over 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1eqve0g?1444774030
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LWW: Case Of The Month - May 2013

This month’s case is by Barbara J. Mroz, M.D. and Robin R. Preston, Ph.D., author of Lippincott’s Illustrated Reviews: .Physiology (ISBN: 9781451175677). For more information, or to purchase your copy, visit: http://tiny.cc/PrestonLIR, with 15% off using the discount code: MEDUCATION. The case below is followed by a choice of diagnostic tests. Select the one lettered selection that would be most helpful in diagnosing the patient’s condition. The Case A 54-year-old male 2 pack-per-day smoker presents to your office complaining of cough and shortness of breath (SOB). He reports chronic mild dyspnea on exertion with a daily cough productive of clear mucus. During the past week, his cough has increased in frequency and is now productive of frothy pink-tinged sputum; his dyspnea is worse and he is now short of breath sometimes even at rest. He has had difficulty breathing when lying flat in bed and has spent the past two nights sleeping upright in a recliner. On physical examination, he is a moderately obese male with a blood pressure of 180/80 mm Hg, pulse of 98, and respiratory rate of 22. His temperature is 98.6°F. He becomes winded from climbing onto the exam table. Auscultation of the lungs reveals bilateral wheezing and crackles in the lower posterior lung fields. There is pitting edema in the lower extremities extending up to the knees.  Question Which if the following tests would be most helpful in confirming the correct diagnosis? A. Spirometry B. Arterial blood gas C. Complete blood count D. B-type natriuretic peptide blood test E. Electrocardiogram Answer? The correct answer is B-type natriuretic peptide blood test. Uncomfortable breathing, or feeling short of breath, is a common medical complaint with multiple causes. When approaching a patient with dyspnea, it is helpful to remember that normal breathing requires both a respiratory system that facilitates gas exchange between blood and the atmosphere, and a cardiovascular system that transports O2 and CO¬2 between the lungs and tissues. Dysfunction in either system may cause dyspnea, and wheezing (or bronchospasm) may be present in both cardiac and pulmonary disease. In this patient, the presence of lower extremity edema and orthopnea (discomfort when lying flat) are both suggestive of congestive heart failure (CHF). Elevated blood pressure (systolic of 180) and a cough productive of frothy pink sputum may also be associated symptoms. While wheezing could also be caused by COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) in the setting of chronic tobacco use, the additional exam findings of lung crackles and edema plus systolic hypertension are all more consistent with CHF. What does the B-type natriuretic peptide blood test tell us? When the left ventricle (LV) fails to maintain cardiac output (CO) at levels required for adequate tissue perfusion, pathways are activated to increase renal fluid retention. A rising plasma volume increases LV preload and sustains CO via the Frank-Starling mechanism. Volume loading also stimulates cardiomyocytes to release atrial- (ANP) and B-type (BNP) natriuretic peptides. BNP has a longer half-life than ANP and provides a convenient marker for volume loading. Plasma BNP levels are measured using immunoassay; levels >100 pg/mL are suggestive of overload resulting in heart failure. How does heart failure cause dyspnea? Increasing venous pressure increases mean capillary hydrostatic pressure and promotes fluid filtration from the vasculature. Excess filtration from pulmonary capillaries causes fluid accumulation within the alveoli (pulmonary edema) and interferes with normal gas exchange, resulting in SOB. Physical signs and symptoms caused by high volume loading include: (1) Lung crackles, caused by fluid within alveoli (2) Orthopnea. Reclining increases pulmonary capillary hydrostatic pressure through gravitational effects, worsening dyspnea when lying flat. (3) Pitting dependent edema caused by filtration from systemic capillaries, an effect also influenced by position (causing edema in the lower legs as in our ambulatory patient or in dependent areas like the sacrum in a bedridden patient). What would an electrocardiogram show? Heart failure can result in LV hypertrophy and manifest as a left axis deviation on an electrocardiogram (ECG), but some patients in failure show a normal ECG. An ECG is not a useful diagnostic tool for dyspnea or CHF per se. Wouldn’t spirometry be more suitable for diagnosing the cause of dyspnea in a smoker? Simple spirometry will readily identify the presence of airflow limitation (obstruction) as a cause of dyspnea. It's a valuable test to perform in any smoker and can establish a diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) if abnormal. While this wheezing patient is an active smoker who could have airflow obstruction, the additional exam findings above point more to a diagnosis of CHF. What would an arterial blood gas show? An arterial blood gas measures arterial pH, PaCO¬2, and PaO2. While both CHF and COPD could cause derangements in the values measured, these abnormalities would not necessarily be diagnostic (e.g., a low PaO2 could be seen in both conditions, as could an elevated PaCO¬2). Would a complete blood count provide useful information? A complete blood count could prove useful if anemia is a suspected cause of dyspnea. Test result BNP was elevated (842 pg/mL), consistent with CHF. Diuretic treatment was initiated to help reduce volume overload and an afterload reducing agent was started to lower blood pressure and improve systolic function.  
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
over 6 years ago
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15

An abnormality at the hepatic flexure

A 92 year old woman presented to the emergency department after collapsing at home. She recalled standing from her chair, feeling lightheaded, and then collapsing. She had felt generally weak for more than a year, with weight loss of 56 lb (25.2 kg) but no change in bowel habit, dysphagia, or gastrointestinal bleeding. Her medical history included hypertension, hypothyroidism, and anaemia (which was currently being investigated by her general practitioner). Among other drugs, she was taking lisinopril, bendroflumethiazide, and levothyroxine. Her son had died at 60 years of age from large bowel obstruction and perforation secondary to colon cancer.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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2
130

Approach to Anemia with Dr. Moffett

Dr. Bryan Moffett is on faculty at the University of Louisville as an Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine. He practices primarily at the VA Hospital and...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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TSRI team discovers enzyme that keeps blood stem cells functional to prevent anemia

Stem cells can generate any type of cell in the body, but they are inactive most of the time--and for good reason.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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18

CardioBreak: Radial Cath, Anemia Drug Warning

Recent developments of interest in cardiovascular medicine.  
medpagetoday.com
over 4 years ago
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18

Red blood cell transfusion for people undergoing hip fracture surgery | Cochrane

Most people who break their hip (hip fracture) are over 65 years old. Almost all hip fractures require surgery. People with hip fracture often receive red blood cell transfusions that aim to correct their anaemia (low levels of haemoglobin in the blood; haemoglobin is an oxygen-carrying molecule found within red blood cells) resulting from blood loss from their fracture or surgery. However, blood transfusion is not without risk. We aimed to look at the evidence for the use of red blood cell transfusion in people undergoing surgery for a broken hip. We wanted to find out whether and when blood transfusion is of benefit and whether there are better alternatives to transfusion for these people.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
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Janus kinase-1 and Janus kinase-2 inhibitors for treating myelofibrosis | Cochrane

Myelofibrosis is a disorder of the bone marrow in which the bone marrow is replaced by fibrous tissue. The symptoms depend on the degree of anemia and enlargement of the spleen. This condition has a poor prognosis and generally its treatment is palliative.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago