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Elbow Flexion

http://www.kinesiologyprep.com - In this video, the motion of elbow flexion is demonstrated starting with the arm at the side of the body with the palm facin...  
YouTube
almost 6 years ago
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12

ANATOMY; MUSCLES THAT MOVE THE LOWER ARM & HANDS by Professor Fink

This is Part 3 of 5 Video Lectures on the Skeletal Muscle Groups of the Human Body by Professor Fink. In this Video Lecture, Professor Fink first describes t...  
YouTube
almost 6 years ago
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ANATOMY; MUSCLES OF THE SHOULDER & UPPER ARM by Professor Fink

This is Part 3 of 5 Video Lectures on the Skeletal Muscle Groups of the Human Body by Professor Fink. In this Video Lecture, Professor Fink describes the Mus...  
YouTube
almost 6 years ago
Www.bmj
1
7

The FAST tool is effective but not for posterior fossa stroke

Hankey and Blacker’s article provides a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of stroke.1 However, an important issue is the failure of the FAST (face, arm, speech, and time) tool to detect posterior fossa strokes in some patients, who might then not be triaged …  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
3

Authors’ reply to Huwez

We thank Huwez for highlighting the deficiencies of the FAST (Face, Arm, Speech, and Time) tool, which records the presence of acute facial paresis, arm drift, and abnormal speech, in diagnosing …  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
20

Focal neurological deficits after trauma

A 38 year old woman developed headache (without neck pain) and weakness of her left upper and lower limbs after a concussive head trauma with scalp lacerations in a motor vehicle crash. On examination (more than 4.5 hours after the trauma), she was conscious, alert, and in cardiac sinus rhythm. There was no carotid bruit. She scored 7 points on the National Institute of Health stroke scale (maximum possible score 42). Positive neurological findings included mild blunting of the left nasolabial fold; left hemiparesis, with extensor muscles being weaker (3/5) than flexors in the left upper limb (4+/5), flexors being weaker (4 to 4+/5) than extensors in the left lower limb (4+ to 5/5), and distal more than proximal weakness in the left arm and leg. She also had brisk deep tendon reflexes in the limbs on the left side; a left extensor plantar response; left hemianopia; and left hemisensory (including the face) hypoaesthesia for pain, cold, and touch. Eyelid ptosis or paresis of extraocular movements were not present, and pupillary size and light reaction were normal.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
41

A sinister cause of shoulder pain, with numbness and weakness in the ipsilateral hand

A 41 year old patient with insulin dependent diabetes presented with a one month history of progressively worsening pain, numbness, and weakness of his right shoulder and arm. His history included peripheral vascular disease, chronic renal failure, and chronic pancreatitis. He was also a smoker with a 60 pack year history.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
12

Surgery is no better than a simple sling for displaced fracture of upper arm, study finds

Displaced fractures in the upper arm near the shoulder can be treated just as effectively with sling immobilisation as with surgical treatment, a randomised clinical trial published in JAMA has found.1  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 thqdyy?1444774274
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Why we need to work to maintain a social life - A Darwinian Medical Training Programme

Book of the week (BotW) = The Darwin Economy by Prof Frank Being a medical student and wanna-be-surgeon, I am naturally very competitive. I know exactly where I want to end up in life. I want to be a surgeon at a major unit doing research, teaching and management, as well as many other things. To reach this goal in a rational way I, and many others like me, need to look at what is required and make sure that we tick the boxes. We must also out-compete every other budding surgeon with a similar interest. Medicine is also a dog-eat-dog world when it comes to getting the job you want. Luckily you can head off into almost any field you find interesting, as long as you have the points on your CV to get access to the training. In recent years, the number of med students has increased, but so has the competition for places. The number of FY1 jobs has increased but so has the competition for good rotations. The number of consultant posts has increased, but so has the competition for the jobs. To even be considered for an interview for a consultant surgeon post these days a candidate (hopefully my future self) will have to demonstrate an excellent knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pathology and demography. They will need to have competent surgical skills and have completed all of the hours and numbers of procedures. To further demonstrate this they will need to have gone on extra-curricular courses and fellowships. They will also need to show that they can teach and have been doing so regularly. They must now also have an understanding of medical leadership and have a portfolio of projects. Finally, they will have had to tick the research box, with posters, publications, oral presentations and research degrees. That’s a long list of tick boxes and guess what? It has been getting longer! I regularly attend a surgical research collaborative meeting in Birmingham. Many of those surgeons didn’t even get taught about research at medical school or publish anything until they were registrars. Now even to get onto a good Core Training post you need to have at the very least some posters in your chosen field and probably a minimum of a publication. That’s a pretty big jump in standards in just 15 years. In two generations the competition has increased exponentially. Why is that? Prof Frank explains economic competition in Darwinian terms. His insights apply equally well to the medical training programme. It’s all about your relative performance compared to your peers and the continual arms race for the best resources (training posts). However, the catch is, if everyone ups their performance by the same amount then you all work harder for no more advantage for anyone, except for the first few people who made the upgrade. The majority do not benefit but are in fact harmed by this continual arms race. I believe that this competition will only get worse as each new year of med students tries to keep up and surpass the previous cohort. This competition will inevitably lead to a greater time commitment from the students with no potential gain. Everything we do is relative to everyone else. If we up our game, we will outperform the competition, until they catch up with us and then relatively we are no better off but are working harder. Why is this relevant? I know everyone will want to select “the best” candidate, but in medicine the “best” candidate doesn’t really exist because we are all almost equally capable of doing the role, once we have had the training. So there is no point us all working ourselves into the ground for a future job, if all our hard work won’t pay off for most of us anyway. But we can’t make these choices as individuals because if one of us says that “I am not going to play the game. I am going to enjoy my free time with my friends and family”, that person won’t get the competitive job because everyone else will out-perform them. We have to tackle this issue as a cohort. How do we ensure that we don’t work ourselves into the ground for nothing? Collectively as medical students and trainees we should ask the BMA and Royal Collages to set out a strict application process that means once candidates have met the minimum requirements, there is no more points for additional effort. For instance, the application form for a surgical consultant post should only have space to include 5 peer-reviewed publications. That way it wouldn’t necessarily matter if you had 5 or 50 publications. This limit may seem counter-intuitive and will possibly work against the highly competitive high achievers, but it will have a positive effect on everyone else’s life. Imagine if you only had to write 5 papers in your career to guarantee a chance at a job, instead of having to write 25. All that extra time you would have had to invest in extra-curricular research can now be used more productively by you to achieve other life goals, like more time with your family or more patient contact or even more time in theatre perfecting your skills. If you were selecting candidates for senior clinicians, would you rather pick an all round doctor who has met all of the requirements and has a balanced work-life balance or a neurotic competitor who hasn’t slept in 8 years and is close to a breakdown? Being a doctor is more than a profession, it is a life-style choice but we should try to prevent it becoming our entire lives.  
jacob matthews
over 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1agiiai?1444774290
1
119

A curious epidemic of superficial accesses in Africa

This anecdote happened many years ago when I was a brand new (read: inexperienced) physician doing my stint in the Colonial Health Service of the former Belgian Congo. I was assigned to a small hospital in the interior of the Maniema province. Soft tissue infections and abscesses were rather common in this tropical climate, but at one time there seemed to be virtual epidemic of abscesses on the buttocks or upper arms. It seemed that patients with these abscesses were all coming from one area of the territory. That seemed rather odd and we started investigating. By way of background let me say that the hospital was also serving several outlying clinics or dispensaries in the territory. Health aides were assigned to a specific dispensary on a periodic basis. Patients would know his schedule and come to the dispensary for their treatments. Now this was the era of “penicillin.” The natives were convinced that this wonder drug would cure all their ailments, from malaria and dysentery, to headaches, infertility, and impotence. You name it and penicillin was thought to be the cure-all. No wonder they would like to get an injection of penicillin for whatever their ailment was. As our investigation demonstrated, the particular health aide assigned to the dispensary from where most of the abscesses came, would swipe a vial of penicillin and a bottle of saline from the hospital’s pharmacy on his way out to his assigned dispensary. When he arrived at his dispensary there was usually already a long line of patients waiting with various ailments. He would get out his vial of the “magic” penicillin, show the label to the crowd and pour it in the liter bottle of saline; shake it up and then proceed to give anyone, who paid five Belgian Francs (at that time equivalent to .10 US $), which he pocketed, an injection of the penicillin, now much diluted in the large bottle of physiologic solution. To make matters worse, he used only one syringe and one needle. No wonder there were so many abscesses in the area of injection. Of course we quickly put a stop to that. Anyone interested in reading more about my experience in Africa and many other areas can download a free e book via Smashwords at: http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/161522 . The title of the book is "Crosscultural Doctoring. On and Off the Beaten Path"  
DR William LeMaire
about 6 years ago
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Bill Gates joins $120m fundraising for Editas Medicine gene start-up - FT.com

Bill Gates and the venture capital arm of Google have participated in a $120m fundraising for Editas Medicine, a biotech group focused on a nascent area of medical science that seeks to use “gene editing” to tackle serious diseases. The lead  
ft.com
about 5 years ago
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Immune (idiopathic) thrombocytopenic purpura: rituximab | key-points-from-the-evidence | Advice | NICE

Most of the evidence for using rituximab in adults with immune thrombocytopenic purpura comes from observational studies, with no comparator arm. The populations in the included studies varied, as did the platelet count considered to represent an overall response or complete response. The randomised controlled trials (RCTs) discussed in this evidence summary had a number of limitations, including small numbers of participants. All of these factors make it difficult to draw firm conclusions from the evidence.  
nice.org.uk
almost 5 years ago
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34

Deltoid Muscle : Ep 10 Anatomy Bytes

Deltoid Muscle : Ep 10 Anatomy Bytes In this Anatomy and Physiology video we take a look at the deltoid muscle. It is one of the muscles that move the arm fr...  
youtube.com
almost 5 years ago
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6

Ray Birdwhistell - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ray Birdwhistell (1918 – October 19, 1994) was an American anthropologist who founded kinesics as a field of inquiry and research.[1] The term kinesics, meaning "facial expression, gestures, posture and gait, and visible arm and body movements", was coined by Birdwhistell.[2] He estimated that "no more than 30 to 35 percent of the social meaning of a conversation or an interaction is carried by the words." [3] Stated more broadly, he argued that "words are not the only containers of social knowledge."[4] He proposed other technical terms, including kineme, and many others less frequently used today.[5] Birdwhistell had at least as much impact on the study of language and social interaction generally as just nonverbal communication because he was interested in the study of communication more broadly than is often recognized.[6] Birdwhistell understood body movements to be culturally patterned rather than universal.[7] His students were required to read widely, sources not only in communication but also anthropology and linguistics.[8] Collaborations with others, including initially Margaret Mead and Gregory Bateson, and later, Erving Goffman and Dell Hymes had huge influence on his work. For example, the book he is best known for, Kinesics and Context, "would not have appeared if it had not been envisaged by Erving Goffman" [9] and he explicitly stated "the paramount and sustaining influence upon my work has been that of anthropological linguistics",[10] a tradition most directly represented at the University of Pennsylvania by Hymes.[11]  
en.wikipedia.org
over 4 years ago
40c0abcc005372620acf561566de8612d3c29ffd07001589159534705
1
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Anatomy questions

a short mcq/blank test on the upper limb.  
Victoria Ho
over 4 years ago
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1
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Spurling's Test or Cervical Axial Compression Test | eHealthStar

The Spurling test--a downward pressure on the head--is intended to determine if the pain in an arm is due to a pinched nerve in the neck.  
ehealthstar.com
over 4 years ago
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1
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Sign language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A sign language (also signed language) is a language which chiefly uses manual communication to convey meaning, as opposed to acoustically conveyed sound patterns. This can involve simultaneously combining hand shapes, orientation and movement of the hands, arms or body, and facial expressions to express a speaker's thoughts. Sign languages share many similarities with spoken languages (sometimes called "oral languages", which depend primarily on sound), which is why linguists consider both to be natural languages. Although there are also some significant differences between signed and spoken languages, such as how they use space grammatically, sign languages show the same linguistic properties and use the same language faculty as do spoken languages.[1][2] They should not be confused with body language, which is a kind of non-linguistic communication.  
en.wikipedia.org
about 4 years ago
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Watch a woman get a 3D-printed skull

Watch a woman get a 3D-printed skull For more latest tech news and product reviews SUBSCRIBE to http://www.youtube.com/user/TechyGUYS When a Dutch woman with a rare condition needed a new skull, surgeons 3D-printed one for her and put it on her brain like a cap. An entire human cranium can now be added to the growing list of 3D-printed body parts that includes a fingertip, a hand, prosthetic eyes, arms, a jaw, and even a new foot for a duck. The plastic skull was made by an Australian firm and placed on the brain of a Dutch woman at Utrecht University's University Medical Center in the Netherlands. The operation, which lasted 23 hours, took place about three months ago, and Dutch News just reported that the patient has returned to work -- plastic noggin and all. "The patient has her sight back entirely, is symptom-free, is back to work, and it is almost impossible to see that she's ever had surgery," lead neurologist Ben Verweij said in a statement. Prior to the procedure, the woman's skull was more than three times thicker than a normal skull due to a rare condition. The increased thickness caused the woman's skull to press on her brain, leading to severe headaches and vision loss. Although the report doesn't name the condition, Camurati-Engelmann disease is among the ailments that can cause skull bones to thicken. "Implants used to be made by hand in the operating theater using a sort of cement which was far from ideal," Verweij said of the procedure, according to Dutch News. "Using 3D printing we can make one to the exact size. This not only has great cosmetic advantages, but patients' brain function often recovers better than using the old method." Verweiji says that although portions of skulls have been swapped out in the past, this is the first time an entire cranium has been replaced in a patient. And I bet this is the first time you've ever seen a plastic skull get attached to a real live brain. Let me know what you think in the comments below. TAGS play station 4, play station, play station 2 emulator, play station emulator, play station 3, free play station emulator, play station network, sony play station, play station 2, xbox one, xbox, xbox 360, xbox live, xbox 360 iso, xbox emulator, xbox 360 game, gta 5 cheat xbox, xbox iso, gta 5 cheat xbox 360, xbox 360 deal, microsoft, microsoft office, microsoft window, microsoft security essentials, microsoft office 2000, 2003 edition microsoft office professional, 2003 microsoft office student, microsoft word, 2007 microsoft office system, microsoft window xp, download microsoft word, microsoft window media center, microsoft internet explorer, 2007 download microsoft word, microsoft excel, microsoft account, microsoft outlook, microsoft corporation, microsoft window 7, microsoft surface, microsoft office word, microsoft download, microsoft online, microsoft office 2010, explorer internet microsoft update, microsoft power point, microsoft update, download microsoft office, microsoft xbox 360, microsoft computer training, apple, apple store, apple itunes music store, apple itunes, apple ipad, apple iphone, apple ipod, apple laptop, apple vacation, apple ipad mini, apple fix, apple logo, apple tv, apple support community, apple software download, apple iphone 5c, apple iphone 5s, apple iphone 4, apple iphone 5, samsung galaxy, samsung, samsung galaxy s4, samsung galaxy s3, viber for samsung, samsung flight, samsung galaxy note, samsung phone, att samsung galaxy, samsung galaxy note 3, samsung kies, samsung galaxy s iii, sprint samsung galaxy, samsung galaxy s2, samsung galaxy tab 3, samsung galaxy s 4, samsung tablet, samsung galaxy tab, samsung galaxy s, att samsung, samsung galaxy note 2, samsung galaxy s5, samsung galaxy tab 2, samsung galaxy mega, samsung galaxy s3 mini, samsung galaxy s4 mini, samsung galaxy s ii, how to screen shot on samsung galaxy s4, mobile samsung, sony, sony video game, sony tv, sony vaio, sony xperia, sony play station, sony ericsson, sony xperia z, sony laptop, sony entertainment network, sony camera, sony xperia z1, sony tv live, sony psp wall, sony vegas, sony vaio laptop, sony computer, sony style, sony mobile,  
Nicole Chalmers
over 6 years ago
3
0
56

test-the-gumption-and-technology-to-beat-what-seems-impossible

It’s late at night. You’re reading a news article about a section of the world with which you’re hardly familiar, but the story strikes a chord. That seemingly innocent village in South Sudan, bombed ruthlessly by its faceless government, but there at the center of it all is a 14-year-old boy, his two arms severed by the violence.  
iQ by Intel
over 6 years ago
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0
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What's the effect of taking blood pressure on both arms at once?

In hospital today, while I was taking a patient's blood pressure, another student asked if she could take her pressure on the other arm to practice. The patient didn't mind, but I thought it might be dangerous. Is this dangerous? What would happen if we pumped the cuff on both arms at the same time? Also, would this give an incorrect reading?  
Mohammed Pervez
almost 8 years ago