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BoomCast, a Smart and Loud 3D Printed Leg Cast |

Anyone who has ever broken an arm or a leg knows full well how bulky and unwieldy conventional casts are. A group of engineers wanted to improve the experi  
medgadget.com
about 5 years ago
Hocoma
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Hocoma ArmeoPower Exoskeleton Robot for Stroke Rehab |

Hocoma, a Swiss firm, recently unveiled a new robot-like exoskeleton for post-stroke rehab of patients' arms and hands. The system relies on video games to  
medgadget.com
about 5 years ago
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Bill Gates joins $120m fundraising for Editas Medicine gene start-up - FT.com

Bill Gates and the venture capital arm of Google have participated in a $120m fundraising for Editas Medicine, a biotech group focused on a nascent area of medical science that seeks to use “gene editing” to tackle serious diseases. The lead  
ft.com
about 5 years ago
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Arm Muscles | Flashcard Anatomy

Arm muscles Anatomy Flashcard. Check out the 3D app at http://AnatomyLearning.com. More videos available on http://AnatomyZone.com. Use this brief flashcard ...  
youtube.com
about 5 years ago
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Differences in Mechanosensory Discrimination Across the Body Surface - Neuroscience - NCBI Bookshelf

The accuracy with which tactile stimuli can be sensed varies from one region of the body to another, a phenomenon that illustrates some further principles of somatic sensation. Figure 9.4 shows the results of an experiment in which variation in tactile ability across the body surface was measured by two-point discrimination. This technique measures the minimal interstimulus distance required to perceive two simultaneously applied stimuli as distinct (the indentations of the points of a pair of calipers, for example). When applied to the skin, such stimuli of the fingertips are discretely perceived if they are only 2 mm apart. In contrast, the same stimuli applied to the forearm are not perceived as distinct until they are at least 40 mm apart! This marked regional difference in tactile ability is explained by the fact that the encapsulated mechanoreceptors that respond to the stimuli are three to four times more numerous in the fingertips than in other areas of the hand, and many times more dense than in the forearm. Equally important in this regional difference are the sizes of the neuronal receptive fields. The receptive field of a somatic sensory neuron is the region of the skin within which a tactile stimulus evokes a sensory response in the cell or its axon (Boxes A and B). Analysis of the human hand shows that the receptive fields of mechanosensory neurons are 1–2 mm in diameter on the fingertips but 5–10 mm on the palms. The receptive fields on the arm are larger still. The importance of receptive field size is easy to envision. If, for instance, the receptive fields of all cutaneous receptor neurons covered the entire digital pad, it would be impossible to discriminate two spatially separate stimuli applied to the fingertip (since all the receptive fields would be returning the same spatial information). Figure 9.4Variation in the sensitivity of tactile discrimination as a function of location on the body surface, measured here by two-point discrimination. (After Weinstein, 1969.)  
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
about 5 years ago
Sinaiem dark
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at-least-the-pad-thai-was-tasty

Your fellow resident just returned from a long lunch break, raving about how good his meal was. He doesn’t seem to notice, but his breathing is labored and his face and arms are covered in an urticarial rash.  
sinaiem.org
about 5 years ago
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Ear Function & Hearing Mechanism

Notes: Here we have three middle bones again. The arm of the malleus is attached to the eardrum, and the footplate of the stapes is attached to the oval window of the cochlea (inner ear). What they are doing is they transmit vibrations of the eardrum into the cochlea. But here we have a problem. Because the impedance of air and impedance of liquid is really different. Which one is bigger? Impedance in the liquid is much bigger than that of air.  
ssc.education.ed.ac.uk
about 5 years ago
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Ultrasound guidance for upper and lower limb blocks | Cochrane

Nerve blocks are used to numb all or part of the arms or legs (peripheral blockade) for surgery, or to provide pain relief after the operation, or both. Using ultrasound, anaesthetists can 'see' vital structures below the skin, which should allow them to place the local anaesthetic injection accurately and avoid damaging other tissues or organs. We aimed to assess whether ultrasound has any advantages over other nerve-locating techniques for nerve blocks of the arms or legs in adults.  
cochrane.org
about 5 years ago
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Brain-Machine Interface Learns to Control Robot Arm Based on User's Error Brain Signals |

Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) restore or replace motor or sensory function in individuals who are disabled by neuromuscular disorders, stroke, or spinal  
medgadget.com
about 5 years ago
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Manipulation and mobilisation for neck disorders | Cochrane

This update assessed the effect of manipulation or mobilisation alone compared with a control or another treatment on pain, function, disability, patient satisfaction, quality of life and global perceived effect in adults experiencing neck pain with or without arm symptoms and headache at immediate- to long-term follow-up.  
cochrane.org
almost 5 years ago
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Different stent graft types to repair thoracic aortic aneurysms | Cochrane

An aneurysm is a localised widening of an artery. The thoracic aorta is the largest artery in the body, delivering blood from the heart to the arms and head. If an aneurysm occurs in the thoracic aorta it can expand and may rupture, resulting in death. Open surgery can treat these aneurysms, which involves opening the chest and placing an artificial graft over the widening. A new alternative treatment involves an artificial stent graft, delivered through an arterial blood vessel in the groin, fixed over the widening. This technique is called endovascular repair. There are many different types of stent grafts available. They differ in how they are inserted into/access the blood vessel, how they attach to the walls of the artery and the design and materials they are made from.  
cochrane.org
almost 5 years ago
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ALS Patients Set New Typing World Record |

We've been covering the BrainGate neural interface system for a decade already as it's been implemented to control robotic arms and on-screen cursors to le  
medgadget.com
almost 5 years ago
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Constraint-induced movement therapy for upper limb (arm) recovery after stroke | Cochrane

We wanted to assess the effects of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) on ability to manage daily activities and on the recovery of movement in paralysed arms after a stroke.  
cochrane.org
almost 5 years ago
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SGEM#131: Gimme Some Antibiotics for Uncomplicated Skin Infections

Case: A 26-year-old male presents to your emergency department with complaints of a painful, reddened area on his right arm. He has no significant past medical history, surgical history, or social history, but reports that he has an allergic reaction to penicillin and cephalosporin antibiotics.  
thesgem.com
almost 5 years ago
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Open Bionics Unveils Three Prosthetic Arms to Turn Kids Into Superheroes |

While they may not be able to fly, instantly freeze their enemies, or shoot lightning from their fingers, children who have missing limbs due to a birth de  
medgadget.com
almost 5 years ago
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Use of FFR-CT Reduces Costs Compared With Diagnostic Angiography

In the invasive-testing arm, the use of FFR-CT in patients at intermediate risk of coronary disease was associated with significantly lower costs compared with an approach that routinely utilized coronary angiography.  
medscape.com
almost 5 years ago
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Munchausen Syndrome Revealed By Subcutaneous Limb Emphysema

Was this 18-year-old patient's subcutaneous emphysema of the shoulder and arm self-inflicted?  
medscape.com
almost 5 years ago
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Arm mole count 'predicts skin cancer risk' - BBC News

Having more than 11 moles on one arm could be an indication of a higher risk of skin cancer or melanoma, research suggests.  
bbc.co.uk
almost 5 years ago
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Robotic Orthotic Arm to Help Elderly Do Difficult Tasks |

While exoskeletons are already used to rehabilitate people with spinal cord injuries, the technology has great potential for people who aren't paralyzed. T  
medgadget.com
almost 5 years ago
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Simple Melanoma Risk Test: Count the Moles on an Arm

The total number of nevi on the body, which is a predictor of melanoma risk, can be estimated simply by counting the number of moles on an arm, say UK and Italian scientists.  
medscape.com
almost 5 years ago