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HOUJC1 2009 | Case 8

ResearchToPractice.com/HOUJC109 – Case 8: 65yo man presenting w/pneumococcal pneumonia & bacteremia, found to have CLL & was treated w/pentostatin/cyclophosphamide/rituximab. Interviews conducted by Neil Love, MD. Produced by Research To Practice.  
Dr Neil Love
about 9 years ago
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Bacteremia and Intravascular Infections with Dr. Ramirez

Dr. Ramirez is a Professor of Medicine at the University of Louisville and is the Division Chief for Infectious Disease. Here, he discusses bacteremia and in...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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Pediatric Bacteremia: Evolving and Dangerous CME/CE

: A retrospective analysis stresses that the evolving nature of pediatric bacteremia prompts the need for more timely antibiotic treatment in children who present to the emergency department.  
medscape.org
over 4 years ago
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pediatric-uti-its-about-future

UTI’s are the ‘in thing’. Particularly with the heptavalent pneumococcal vaccine in play, and bacteremia increasingly a part of our past, UTI’s have become the number one concern in febrile children over 2 months of age. So if you’re wondering about how and why fevers matter in kids, and what to do about them, we’ve got your answer.  
smartem.org
over 4 years ago
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Critical Care

Selective digestive decontamination (SDD) and selective oropharyngeal decontamination (SOD) have been associated with reduced mortality and lower ICU-acquired bacteremia and ventilator-associated pneumonia rates in areas with low levels of antibiotic resistance. However, the effect of selective decontamination (SDD/SOD) in areas where multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria are endemic is less clear. It will be important to determine whether SDD/SOD improves patient outcome in such settings and how these measures affect the epidemiology of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Here we review the current evidence on the effects of SDD/SOD on antibiotic resistance development in individual ICU patients as well as the effect on ICU ecology, the latter including both ICU-level antibiotic resistance and antibiotic resistance development during long-term use of SDD/SOD.  
ccforum.com
about 4 years ago
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Critical Care

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) remains an important pathogen in pneumonia. Bacteremia may secondarily complicate MRSA pneumonia. The epidemiology and outcomes associated with bacteremia in the setting of MRSA pneumonia are unknown. We sought to describe the prevalence of bacteremia in MRSA pneumonia and its impact on hospital mortality and length of stay (LOS).  
ccforum.com
about 4 years ago
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Septic Shock Due to Pasteurella multocida Bacteremia

Was this elderly patient's cat the source of her Pasteurella infection?  
medscape.com
almost 4 years ago
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Nosocomial Bacteremia Secondary to Urinary Catheters

Are male patients at higher risk than females for catheter-associated bacteremia?  
medscape.com
almost 4 years ago
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Section on Emergency Medicine abstracts from #AAP15 – Part 2

Clinical Characteristics Associated with Bacteremia in Non‐Neutropenic Pediatric Oncology Patients with Indwelling Central Venous Catheters  
pemcincinnati.com
almost 4 years ago
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Diabetes Patients at Higher Risk of S aureus Blood Infection

The risk of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia is increased almost threefold in diabetes patients and is even higher in those with progressive disease, Danish registry data suggest.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Diabetes Increases Risk for Community-Acquired Bacteremia CME/CE

: Diabetes is associated with a markedly increased risk for community-acquired <em>Staphylococcus aureus</em> bacteremia, particularly for diabetes of long duration with poor glycemic control and complications.  
medscape.org
over 3 years ago
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Mortality Predictors of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

What factors might influence mortality and outcome in patients with S. aureus bacteremia?  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Diagnosis and Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults - American Family Physician

Community-acquired pneumonia is diagnosed by clinical features (e.g., cough, fever, pleuritic chest pain) and by lung imaging, usually an infiltrate seen on chest radiography. Initial evaluation should determine the need for hospitalization versus outpatient management using validated mortality or severity prediction scores. Selected diagnostic laboratory testing, such as sputum and blood cultures, is indicated for inpatients with severe illness but is rarely useful for outpatients. Initial outpatient therapy should include a macrolide or doxycycline. For outpatients with comorbidities or who have used antibiotics within the previous three months, a respiratory fluoroquinolone (levofloxacin, gemifloxacin, or moxifloxacin), or an oral beta-lactam antibiotic plus a macrolide should be used. Inpatients not admitted to an intensive care unit should receive a respiratory fluoroquinolone, or a beta-lactam antibiotic plus a macrolide. Patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia or who are admitted to the intensive care unit should be treated with a beta-lactam antibiotic, plus azithromycin or a respiratory fluoroquinolone. Those with risk factors for Pseudomonas should be treated with a beta-lactam antibiotic (piperacillin/tazobactam, imipenem/cilastatin, meropenem, doripenem, or cefepime), plus an aminoglycoside and azithromycin or an antipseudomonal fluoroquinolone (levofloxacin or ciprofloxacin). Those with risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus should be given vancomycin or linezolid. Hospitalized patients may be switched from intravenous to oral antibiotics after they have clinical improvement and are able to tolerate oral medications, typically in the first three days. Adherence to the Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines for the management of community-acquired pneumonia has been shown to improve patient outcomes. Physicians should promote pneumococcal and influenza vaccination as a means to prevent community-acquired pneumonia and pneumococcal bacteremia.  
aafp.org
over 3 years ago