New to Meducation?
Sign up
Already signed up? Log In
89d3670b52fd41cb9ef93065e272c0253b444e45848740847958096
522
31137

Bacteriology Map: Cocci, Bacili and Spiral

An incredible diagram on bacteriology. Remember a lot of hard details quickly and easily!  
mohammed
over 2 years ago
Preview
134
5440

Antibiotic therapy

A guide to classes of antibiotics, how antibiotics work against bacteria and mechanisms of bacterial resistance.  
Rafi Ahmed
over 3 years ago
Preview
22
1413

Gram positive bacilli

GRAM  +ve  Bacteria:  BACILLI     SPORE  FORMERS   NON-­‐SPORE  FORMERS   BACTERIA   Clostridium   Bacillis   Listeria   Erysipeloth…  
Sarah West
over 4 years ago
Preview
16
1304

Gram Positive Bacteria

Infographic showing Classification of Gram Positive Bacteria  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 3 years ago
Preview
15
893

Gram Negative Bacteria

Infographic showing classification of Gram Negative Bacteria  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 3 years ago
6cf7a4ab4825634634e1aca2e9177dba
13
723

I can't get my head around pharmacology

Maybe it’s just me, but I cannot get my head around pharmacology and antibiotics are certainly doing their best to finish me off! My group at uni decided that this was one area that we needed to revise, and the task fell on my hands to provide the material for a revision session. So, the night before the session I began to panic about how to come up with any useful tips for my group, or indeed anyone at all, to try to remember anything useful about antibiotics at all. If only Paracetamoxyfrusebendroneomycin was a real drug, it would make our lives so much easier. Come on Adam Kay and Suman Biswas, get the trials started and create your wonderful super drug. For the mean time I guess I will just have to keep blissfully singing along to your song. However, that is not going to help me with my task in hand. After a lot of research that even took me beyond the realms of Wikipedia (something I do not often like to do), I found various sources suggesting remembering these Top 10 Rules (and their exceptions) All cell wall inhibitors are ?-lactams (except vancomycin) All penicillins are water soluble (nafcillin) All protein synthesis inhibitors are bacteriostatic (aminoglycosides) All cocci are Gram positive (Neisseria spp.) All bacilli are Gram negative (anthrax, tetanus, botulism, diptheria) All spirochetes are Gram negative Tetracyclines and macrolides are used for intracellular bacteria Pregnant women should not take tetracyclines, aminoglycosides, fluroquinolones, or sulfonamides Antibiotics beginning with a ‘C’ are particularly associated with pseudomembranous colitis While the penicillins are the most famous for causing allergies, people may also react to cephalosporins If those work for you, then I guess you can stop reading now… If they don’t, I can’t promise that I have anything better, but give these other tips that I found a whirl… Alternatively, I have created a Page on my own blog called Rang and Dale’s answer to Antibiotics, which summarises their information, so please take a look at that. Most people will suggest that you can categorise antibiotics in three ways, and it’s best to pick one and learn examples of them. Mode of action: bactericidal (kill) bacteriostatic (stop multiplying) 2 mnemonics to potentially help you remember examples: We’re ECSTaTiC about bacteriostatics? Erythromycin Clindamycin Sulphonamides Tetracyclines Trimethoprim Chloramphenicol Very Finely Proficient At Cell Murder (bactericidal) - Vancomycin Fluroquinolones Penicillins Aminoglycosides Cephalosporins Metranidazole Spectrum of activity: broad-spectrum (gram positive AND negative) narrow (gram positive OR negative) Mechanism of action Inhibit cell wall synthesis Inhibit nucleic acid synthesis Inhibit protein synthesis Inhibit cell membrane synthesis If you have any more weird and wonderful ways to remember antibiotics, let me know and I will add them! As always, thank you for reading.  
Mrs Malaika Smith
almost 4 years ago
Default
11
510

watch

*Urinary Tract Infections* A urinary tract infection (UTI) can occur in any part of the urinary tract. Bacteria cause the vast majority of Urinary Tract Infe...  
youtube.com
about 2 years ago
Preview
10
1018

Classification of Bacteria

The opening video on a course on antibiotics, focusing on how morphology, gram stain, and other tests of bacteria can be used to create a clinically useful classification scheme.  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 4 years ago
Preview
7
291

Microbiology - Bacteria (Structure)

http://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 4 years ago
Preview
6
186

Diagnostic Testing for Bacterial STDs and UTIs

This is a chart including testing information to differentiate between different bacteria causing STDs and UTIs. It also includes urine dipstick testing. Pink is gram negative bacteria and blue is gram positive. The document is in word format so it can be changed and updated as needed.  
A Wallace
about 3 years ago
Preview
4
266

Microbiology - Bacteria Growth, Reproduction, Classification

http://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 4 years ago
Preview
4
358

Microbiology - Bacteria Antibiotic Resistance

https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan Twitter: https://twit...  
YouTube
about 3 years ago
Preview
3
151

Microbiology - Bacteria Antibiotic Resistance

https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan Twitter: https://twit...  
YouTube
almost 3 years ago
Preview
3
98

Microbiology Review- BACTERIAL CELL WALL

This lecture covers bacterial cell wall structure and functions. How bacteria causes infections and develop anitbiotic resistance.  
YouTube
over 3 years ago
Preview
2
439

Bacteria Basics : Microbiology Lectures

Bacteria Basics : Microbiology Lectures In this new video we look at the basics of bacteria. We look at their classifications, sizes, shapes and how they rep...  
youtube.com
over 2 years ago
Preview
2
102

Spirochaetaceae

Classification of Spirochaetes (spirochaetaceae Bacteria). Infographic  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 3 years ago
Preview
2
100

Diagnostic Pathology: Infectious Diseases

Diagnostic Pathology: Infectious Diseases takes a comprehensive look at infectious diseases, their anatomic manifestations, and how to ensure a complete and accurate sign out at the microscope. A user-friendly chapter landscape and thousands of high-quality images combine to make this medical reference book a key companion for the general surgical pathologist or resident in training. Comprehensive discussions on how to sign out cases. Formatted into sections by organism type (Virus, Bacteria, Fungi, and Parasite), and further divided by those that can be diagnosed on histological appearance. Species-specific pathologies for finding "zebra" cases.Essential information is listed in a bulleted format with numerous high-quality images to facilitate learning."Key Facts" highlight the quick criteria needed for diagnosis or adequacy evaluation at the time of a procedure.Features clear pictures of diagnostic forms, ancillary diagnostic tools, including microbiology and molecular diagnostics, pathological reaction patterns expected for given organisms, and important common and uncommon pathogens.Explains when and when not to use molecular diagnostics, and discusses histological limitations and how to address them at sign out.  
books.google.co.uk
over 2 years ago
Preview
3
41

A CLINICALLY BIASED ACCOUNT OF COMMON PATHOGENIC BACTERIA

A CLINICALLY BIASED ACCOUNT OF COMMON PATHOGENIC BACTERIA The basic structure of most bacteria is illustrated in Figure 10. Figure 10. Bacterial Structure  
Philip Welsby
over 6 years ago
55142b64cd10aaa3ac970e0332a84b25
4
223

Poo transplants

When is it medically advisable to eat some one else's poo? When you need a poo transplant. Poo transplants could be the solution to one of the biggest problems facing the NHS today- the bacterial infection Clostridium difficile. C.diff, as it's known to its friends, infects about 18,000 people in England and Wales every year and is involved in the deaths of about 2000 people. C.diff typically arises due to imbalances in the normal gut bacteria. The gut is like a city, a city with about 100 trillion bacterial residents happily munching away on a banquet of bowel contents. The average person has about 1000 different types of bacteria in their gut, and about 3% of healthy adults have C.diff in that mix. The C.diff doesn't cause them any problems because its numbers are kept in check by the other gut bacteria. However treatment with broad spectrum antibiotics such as clindamycin, cephalosporins, ciprofloxacin and co-amoxiclav, can disrupt this happy community- killing off vast swathes of bacteria but crucially not the C.diff. Given free rein the C.diff multiplies rapidly and produces toxins which damage the gut. In some people this causes mild diarrhoea and abdominal pain, in others it can lead to torrential diarrhoea, perforation of the colon and death. Traditional treatment includes stopping any broad spectrum antibiotics and possibly prescribing antibiotics which target the C.diff such as metronidazole or vancomycin. However with antibiotic use comes the risk of resistance. Moreover our current approach isn't entirely effective and about 22% of patients treated suffer a recurrence. This can result in a cycle of illness and hospital admission which is costly to the patient and the hospital. So it's time to start thinking outside of the box. Cue the poo transplant. The thinking goes like this- if the cause of the problem is disruption to the normal community of gut bacteria, why not just pop those bacteria back in to crowd out the C.diff? Simples. Practically, the first step is to identify a donor, usually a close relative of the patient, and screen them for a range of infectious diseases and parasites. It's also advisable to make sure they haven't recently consumed anything the intended recipient is allergic to, before asking them to make their "donation". You then pop it in a household blender and blitz it down, adding saline or milk to achieve a slurry consistency. Next you need to strain your concoction to remove large materials- one medic in the UK uses coffee filters. Top tip. Then you're ready to administer it- about 25ml from above (e.g. via nasogastric tube), or 250ml from below. Now, its important to note that poo transplants are still an experimental treatment. To date only small case studies have been carried out, but with 200 total reported cases, an average cure rate of 96% and no serious adverse events reported to date, it's worth carrying out a large trial to assess it thoroughly. Poo transplants- arguably the ideal treatment for a cash strapped NHS. It's cheap, plentiful and it seems to work. Now to convince people to consume someone else's poo... Bottoms up! FYI: This was first posted on my own blog. Image Courtesy of Marcus007 at de.wikipedia [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons  
Dr Catherine Carver
over 4 years ago