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Microbiology - Bacteria Antibiotic Resistance

https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan Twitter: https://twit...  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
2c65da060b770e2accfb6b3e4e66b23ae2ded73a30624359443886495
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516

Antimicrobial drugs in CZ

Table of antimicrobial drugs (bacteria, viruses, parasites, mycological) for exam of the Medical microbiology in Czech republic. PS: It's in Czech.  
David Dufek
almost 4 years ago
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75

Test PDF 5

GRAM +ve Bacteria: COCCI BACTERIA STAPHILOCOCCI STREPTOCOCCI VIRULENT OPORTUNISTIC TONSIL GENITAL TRACT BOVINE MAMMARY GLAND INTESTINE S.aureus (biotypes: A-D)…  
Mr Malcolm Landon
almost 6 years ago
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47

Test PDF 6

GRAM +ve Bacteria: COCCI BACTERIA STAPHILOCOCCI STREPTOCOCCI VIRULENT OPORTUNISTIC TONSIL GENITAL TRACT BOVINE MAMMARY GLAND INTESTINE S.aureus (biotypes: A-D)…  
Mr Malcolm Landon
almost 6 years ago
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2
48

Test PDF 8

GRAM +ve Bacteria: COCCI BACTERIA STAPHILOCOCCI STREPTOCOCCI VIRULENT OPORTUNISTIC TONSIL GENITAL TRACT BOVINE MAMMARY GLAND INTESTINE S.aureus (biotypes: A-D)…  
Mr Malcolm Landon
almost 6 years ago
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2
114

Pneumonia (Adults)

This article describes adult respiratory tract infection. For more information, please see paediatric respiratory infections   Pneumonia is a common lower respiratory tract infection, characterised by inflammation of the lung tissue. It is almost always an acute infection, and almost always caused by bacteria. Diagnosis is typically confirmed via chest x-ray.  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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114

Spirochaetaceae

Classification of Spirochaetes (spirochaetaceae Bacteria). Infographic  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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Why is it More Difficult to Treat Gram Negative Bacteria

Copyright 2012 Medimoon.com. All rights reserved. No part of this site can be reproduced without our written permission.  
MediMoon
about 5 years ago
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29

SPIROCHETES Thin walled , flexible, s

 
medfools.com
almost 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 ud040l?1444774156
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457

I hate being on-call - I’m just not good at sleeping on the job

BOXING Day, 1.30am. “Are you the doctor on call?” I wrenched my reluctant brain from its REM state. “Yes.” “I’m worried about my wife. She’s 16 weeks pregnant and very gassy.” “Gassy?” “Burping and farting. Smells terrible! It’s keeping us both awake. I’m worried it could be serious.” By the time I ascertained that there were no sinister symptoms and that the likely culprit was the custard served with Christmas pudding (the patient was lactose intolerant), I was wide awake. My brain refused to power down for hours, as if out of spite for being so rudely aroused. I have a confession to make. When the Australian Federal Government announced that it was planning to abolish after-hours practice incentive payments, I was delighted. I know, I know, I should have been outraged along with the rest of you. After all, the RACGP predicted that after-hours care would be decimated if incentives were removed. Comparisons were made with the revamp of the UK system in 2004, which led to 90% of the profession opting out of after-hours work. Much as I sympathised, I was secretly rubbing my hands together with selfish glee. Surely this would mean that our semi-rural practice would stop doing all of our own on-call and free me from my after-hours responsibilities? I detest being on call. I loathe it with a passion completely out of proportion to the imposition it actually causes. I’m on call for the practice and our local hospital only once a week and the workload isn’t onerous. Middle-of-the-night calls aren’t all that frequent, but my sleep can be disturbed by their mere possibility, leaving me tired and cranky. If I’m forced suddenly into “brain on, work mode” by a phone call, I can kiss hours of precious slumber goodbye. I love to sleep, but, as with drawing and tennis, I’m not very good at it. I gaze with envy at those lucky devils who nap on public transport and fight malicious urges to disturb their peaceful repose. If I’m not supine, in a quiet, warm room, with loose-fitting clothing, a firm mattress and a pillow shaped just-so, I can forget any chance of sleep. Let’s just say I can relate to the Princess and the Pea story. I bet she wouldn’t have coped well with being phoned in the middle of the night either. If these nocturnal calls were all bona fide emergencies, I wouldn’t mind so much. It’s the crap that really riles me. I’ve received middle-of-the-night phone calls from patients who are constipated, patients with impacted cerumen (“Me ear’s blocked, Doc. I can’t sleep”) and patients with insomnia who want to know if it’s safe to take a second sedative. The call that took the on-call cake for me, though, was from a couple who woke me at 11.30 one night to settle an argument. “My husband says that bacteria are more dangerous than viruses but I reckon viruses are worse. After all, AIDS is a virus. Can you settle it for us so we can get some sleep? It would really help us out.” I kid you not. Genevieve Yates is an Australian GP, medical educator, medico-legal presenter and writer. You can read more of her work at http://genevieveyates.com  
Dr Genevieve Yates
almost 6 years ago
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433

Bacteria Basics : Microbiology Lectures

Bacteria Basics : Microbiology Lectures In this new video we look at the basics of bacteria. We look at their classifications, sizes, shapes and how they rep...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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99

Diagnostic Pathology: Infectious Diseases

Diagnostic Pathology: Infectious Diseases takes a comprehensive look at infectious diseases, their anatomic manifestations, and how to ensure a complete and accurate sign out at the microscope. A user-friendly chapter landscape and thousands of high-quality images combine to make this medical reference book a key companion for the general surgical pathologist or resident in training. Comprehensive discussions on how to sign out cases. Formatted into sections by organism type (Virus, Bacteria, Fungi, and Parasite), and further divided by those that can be diagnosed on histological appearance. Species-specific pathologies for finding "zebra" cases.Essential information is listed in a bulleted format with numerous high-quality images to facilitate learning."Key Facts" highlight the quick criteria needed for diagnosis or adequacy evaluation at the time of a procedure.Features clear pictures of diagnostic forms, ancillary diagnostic tools, including microbiology and molecular diagnostics, pathological reaction patterns expected for given organisms, and important common and uncommon pathogens.Explains when and when not to use molecular diagnostics, and discusses histological limitations and how to address them at sign out.  
books.google.co.uk
over 4 years ago
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Hot tub folliculitis: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia

Hot tub folliculitis is an infection of the skin around the lower part of the hair shaft (hair follicles). It occurs when you come into contact with certain bacteria that live in warm and wet areas.  
nlm.nih.gov
about 4 years ago
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Bacterial Vaginosis (BV)

THE most common cause of pathological vaginal discharge. Can be caused by an overgrowth of many types of bacteria, usually anaerobes. There is alos often a decrease in the number of lactobacilli. Not sexually transmitted   Epidemiology Affects 10% of women in the UK, but most cases are asymptomatic   Presentation  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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Weight loss: Is the secret in your bacteria? - BBC News

Researchers say changing the type of bugs found in the gut may be more effective at helping people to lose weight than cutting calories alone - but can it be that simple?  
BBC News
over 5 years ago
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Microbiology Review- BACTERIAL CELL WALL

This lecture covers bacterial cell wall structure and functions. How bacteria causes infections and develop anitbiotic resistance.  
YouTube
about 5 years ago
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Table of Contents - Online Textbook of Bacteriology

Todar's Online Textbook of Bacteriology chapters on bacteriology, microbes in the environment, cycles of elements, bacterial structure, bacterial nutrition, bacterial growth, bacterial metabolism, bacteria and archaea, normal flora, bacterial pathogens, bacterial toxins, endotoxin, antibiotics, antibiotic resistance, staphylococci and MRSA, streptococcus, pneumonia, anthrax, E. coli, cholera, Salmonella, Pseudomonas, Shigella, gonorrhea, meningococcal meningitis, botulism and tetanus hib meningitis, Listeria, whooping cough, B. cereus food poisoning, tuberculosis, diphtheria, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Lyme disease, Vibrio vulnificus, Bacillus, lactic acid bacteria.  
textbookofbacteriology.net
about 5 years ago
Th mmed lrg
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Medical Microbiology - NCBI Bookshelf

Medical Microbiology begins with a review of the immune system, focusing on the body's response to invading microorganisms. Bacteria are then covered, first with a series of chapters presenting the general concepts of bacterial microbiology and then with chapters detailing the major bacterial pathogenes of humans. Similar sections cover virology, mycology, and parasitology. In each section, the introductory chapters stress the mechanisms of infection characteristic of that type of microorganism, thus providing the reader with a framework for understanding rather than memorizing the clinical behavior of the pathogens. The final section of the book Introduction to Infectious Diseases, is arranged by organ system and provides transition for clinical considerations.  
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
almost 5 years ago
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Biological, Behavioral, and Social Factors Affecting Health - Health and Behavior - NCBI Bookshelf

In the early years of scientific medicine, most clinicians and researchers thought only in terms of single causes: specific agents that cause specific disease. For example, an infection was considered to result only from the proliferation of bacteria, while other kinds of ill health might result from viruses, toxins, accidents, or flaws in a person's genetic makeup. More recent research highlights the relationships between health and behavioral, psychological, and social variables.  
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
almost 5 years ago