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Foo20151013 2023 1fflsju?1444774064
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My Grandfather's Complimentary Medicine - The secret to a healthy old age?

Complimentary medicine (CAM) is controversial, especially when it is offered by the NHS! You only have to read the recent health section of the Telegraph to see Max Pemberton and James LeFanu exchanging strong opinions. Most of the ‘therapies’ available on the market have little to no evidence base to support their use and yet, I believe that it has an important role to play in modern medicine. I believe that CAM is useful not because of any voodoo magic water or because the soul of a tiger lives on in the dust of one of its claws but because modern medicine hasn’t tested EVERYTHING yet and because EVERY DOCTOR should be allowed to use a sugar pill or magic water to ease the anguish of the worried well every now and again. The placebo effect is powerful and could be used to help a lot of patients as well as save the NHS a lot of money. I visited my grandfather for a cup of coffee today. As old people tend to do we discussed his life, his life lessons and his health . My grandfather is 80-something years old and worked as a collier underground for about 25 years before rising up through the ranks of management. In his entire life he has been to hospital twice: Once to have his tonsils removed and once to have a TKR – total knee replacement. My granddad maintains that the secret of his good health is good food, plenty of exercise, keeping his mind active and 1 dried Ivy berry every month! He takes the dried ivy berries because a gypsie once told his father that doing so would prevent infection of open wounds; common injuries in those working under ground. It is my granddad’s firm belief that the ivy berries have kept him healthy over the past 60 years, despite significant drinking and a 40 year pack history! My grandfather is the only person I know who takes this quite bizarre and potentially dangerous CAM, but he has done so for over half a century now and has suffered no adverse effects (that we can tell anyway)! This has led me to think about the origin of medicine and the evolution of modern medicine from ancient treatments: Long ago medicine meant ‘take this berry and see what happens’. Today, medicine means ‘take this drug (or several drugs) and see what happens, except we’ll write it down if it all goes wrong’. Just as evidence for modern therapies have been established, is there any known evidence for the ivy berry and what else is it used for? My grandfather gave me a second piece of practical advice this afternoon, in relation to the treatment of open wounds: To stop bleeding cover the wound in a bundle of spiders web. You can collect webs by wrapping them up with a stick, then slide the bundle of webs off the stick onto the wound and hold it in place. If the wound is quite deep then cover the wound in ground white pepper. I have no idea whether these two tips actually work but they reminded me of ‘QuickClot’ (http://www.z-medica.com/healthcare/About-Us/QuikClot-Product-History.aspx) a powder that the British Army currently issues to all its frontline troops for the treatment of wounds. The powder is poured into the wound and it forms a synthetic clot reducing blood loss. This technology has been a life-saver in Afghanistan but is relatively expensive. Supposing that crushed white pepper has similar properties, wouldn’t that be cheaper? While I appreciate that the two are unlikely to have the same level of efficacy, I am merely suggesting that we do not necessarily dismiss old layman’s practices without a little investigation. I intend to go and do a few searches on pubmed and google but just thought I’d put this in the public domain and see if anyone has any corroborating stories. If your grandparents have any rather strange but potentially useful health tips I’d be interested in hearing them. You never know they may just be the treatments of the future!  
jacob matthews
over 6 years ago
7
3
78

Arterial Blood Gases

This episode is a discussion about how to approach an arterial blood gas result.  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
about 9 years ago
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3
75

Factors Affecting G.F.R.

Kidneys are a regulatory organ that excrete of waste products. This is with a high rate of blood flow, filtration and reabsorption.  
Ashok Solanki
over 6 years ago
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3
79

Platelet satellitism - Full Blood Count Masterclass Series

Platelet satellitism can easily catch you unawares, if you are not careful. In this video, the mechanisms and implication of the presence of platelet satellitism is described making use of a case study.  
Vernon Louw
over 6 years ago
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3
59

The Buffy Coat and Smear - Full Blood Count Masterclass series

The Buffy smear is a VERY useful diagnostic in some serious conditions. Every medical student and doctor should know when and how to use it. Hope you enjoy this screencast!  
Vernon Louw
over 6 years ago
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3
215

Axillary Artery Branches: Anatomy Mnemonic (Dirty): Better than steak and potatoes!

Mnemonic explains the branches of the axillary artery. Funny/crude tutorial for easy anatomy learning the blood supply for shoulder. Teens grow up and die! Please SUBSCRIBE for new videos: More cool stuff coming as we get more Hippo Helpers!. Anatomy mnemonic playlist at: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLIPkjUW-piR2QuaJ7zaxA7X-A9netP0cK Visit: http://helphippo.com for archived videos, organized by topic/school year. Anatomy flashcards at: http://helphippo.com/flash/flashcards.html  
HelpHippo.com
over 5 years ago
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3
178

B Vitamins Mnemonic: Metabolic deficiencies- Water and Fat Soluable Cofactors Tutorial

A mnemonic for B vitamins - convoluted, but it's better than brute force memorization. Please SUBSCRIBE for new videos: More cool stuff coming as we get more Hippo Helpers! Pathology tutorial playlist at: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLIPkjUW-piR2HEbxFVzJ-jIH0TxcBrc_K In addition to a quick introduction to B1, B2, B3, B4, B5, B6 and B12, there are keywords at the end for fat-soluble vitamin A, D, E, and K. PS: Cobalamin is intentionally mispronounced as "Cobalbumin" - it helps remember the anemia association, like how "Albumin" is in the blood :) Visit: http://helphippo.com for archived videos, organized by topic/school year.  
HelpHippo.com
over 5 years ago
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3
260

Bacterial Etiologies of Common Infections (Antibiotics - Lecture 2)

A summary of the role and composition of normal flora, the typical bacterial pathogens causing several common infectious diseases, diagnosis of UTI, and interpretation as to whether a positive blood culture represents true infection or contamination. Bonus points to anyone who can identify the mystery portrait.  
Nicole Chalmers
over 5 years ago
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3
129

Clinical Consequences of Liver Disease

Vitamins A, D, E and K are all stored in the liver, as is vitamin B12. Therefore, in liver damage, you can’t store as many of these as you would like to.   Portal circulation Note that there are no valves in the portal circulation. The portal supply is 70% of the blood that the liver receives. The other 30% is supplied by the hepatic artery.   The four main veins that contribute to the portal system are: Splenic vein Superior mesenteric  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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3
115

Heart Failure

Heart Failure is... Inability of the heart to pump adequate amounts of blood to meet the body's metabolic demands End stage of all heart diseases Accounts for 5 in 1000 hospital admission each year in the UK   Terms;  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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155

Sepsis and SIRS

Definitions. Before discussing SIRS along with the various sepsis syndromes, it is important to understand some basic definitions. Infection: This is the inflammatory response initiated by the presence of a micro-organisms in normally sterile tissue. Bacteraemia: The presence of live bacteria in the blood stream. This can occur in a healthy individual and present with no symptoms. Common causes include surgery, dental procedures and even tooth brushing.  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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3
98

Hepatitis B/ Chronic Hepatitis/Serum Hepatitis

• In the family Hepadnaviridae; common name: Hepadnavirus • Known as the smallest DNA virus • Double stranded, circular 42 nm DNA genome;Virion also called Dan…  
SlideShare
over 5 years ago
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59

Category of blood variation in shape "POIKILOCYTOSIS"

CATEGORY OF BLOOD VARIATION IN SHAPE “POIKILOCYTOSIS” PRINCESS ALEN AGUILAR  
SlideShare
over 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1njk26?1444774138
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133

Doctor or a scientist?

"One special advantage of the skeptical attitude of mind is that a man is never vexed to find that after all he has been in the wrong" Sir William Osler Well, it's almost Christmas. I know it's Christmas because the animal skeleton situated in the reception of my University's Anatomy School has finally been re-united with his (or her?) Christmas hat, has baubles for eyes and tinsel on its ribcage. This doesn't help with my trying to identify it (oh the irony if it is indeed a reindeer). This term has probably been one of the toughest academic terms I've had, but then when you intercalate that is sort of what you choose to let yourself in for. I used to think that regular readings were a chore in the pre-clinical years. I had ample amounts of ethics, sociology and epidemiology readings to do but this is nothing compared to the world of scientific papers. The first paper I had to read this term related to Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) integrity in articular cartilage and its possible role in the pathogenesis of Osteoarthritis. Well, I know that now. When I first started reading it felt very much like a game of boggle and highly reminiscent of high school spanish lessons where I just sat and nodded my head. This wasn't the end. Every seminar has come with its own prescribed reading list. The typical dose is around 4-5 papers. This got me thinking. We don't really spend all that much time understanding how to read scientific papers nor do we really explore our roles as 'scientists' as well as future clinicians. Training programmes inevitably seem to create false divides between the 'clinicans' and the 'academics' and sometimes this has negative consequences - one simply criticises the other: Doctors don't know enough about science, academics are out of touch with the real world etc... Doctors as scientists... The origins of medicine itself lie with some of the greatest scientists of all time - Herophilus, Galen, Da Vinci, William Harvey (the list is endless). As well as being physicians, all of these people were also respected scientists who regularly made contributions to our understanding of the body's mechanics. Albeit, the concept of ethics was somewhat thrown to the wind (Herophilus, though dead for thousands of years, is regularly accused of performing vivisections on prisoners in his discovery of the duodenum). Original sketches by William Harvey which proved a continuous circuit of blood being supplied and leaving the upper limb. He used his observations to explain the circulatory system as we know it today What was unique about these people? The ability to challenge what they saw. They made observations, tested them against their own knowledge and asked more questions - they wanted to know more. As well as being doctors, we have the unique opportunity to make observations and question what we see. What's causing x to turn into y? What trends do we see in patients presenting with x? The most simple question can lead to the biggest shift in understanding. It only took Semmelweiss to ask why women were dying in a maternity ward to give rise to our concept of modern infection control. Bad Science... Anyone who has read the ranting tweets, ranting books and ranting YouTube TED videos of academic/GP Ben Goldacre will be familiar with this somewhat over used term. Pseudoscience (coined by the late great Karl Popper) is a much more sensible and meaningful term. Science is about gathering evidence which supports your hypothesis. Pseudoscience is a field which makes claims that cannot be tested by a study. In truth, there's lots and lots of relatively useless information in print. It's fine knowing about biomarker/receptor/cytokine/antibody/gene/transcription factor (insert meaningless acronym here) but how is it relevant and how does it fit into the bigger picture? Science has become reductionist. We're at the gene level and new reducing levels of study (pharmacogenetics) break this down even further and sometimes, this is at an expense of providing anything useful to your clinicial toolbox. Increasing job competition and post-graduate 'scoring' systems has also meant there's lots of rushed research in order to get publications and citations. This runs the danger of further undermining the doctors role as a true contributor to science. Most of it is wrong... I read an article recently that told me at least 50% of what I learn in medical school will be proven wrong in my lifetime. That might seem disheartening since I may have pointlessly consumed ample coffee to revise erroneous material. However, it's also exciting. What if you prove it wrong? What if you contributed to changing our understanding? As a doctor, there's no reason why you can't. If we're going to practice evidence-based medicine then we need to understand that evidence and doing this requires us to wear our scientist hat. It would be nice to see a whole generation of doctors not just willing to accept our understanding but to challenge that which is tentative. That's what science is all about. Here's hoping you don't find any meta-analyses in your stockings. Merry Christmas.  
Lucas Brammar
over 5 years ago
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234

Upper Limb Arteries - Hand and Wrist - 3D Anatomy Tutorial

Blood supply to the hand and wrist upper limb arteries anatomy tutorial. Check out the 3D app at http://AnatomyLearning.com. More tutorials available on http...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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31

Blood and nerve supply of the face - outline

This video is part of the playlist "Essential Anatomy for Botox Facial Injections": http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLRbPzV4ZYk0xBCGxUO3PitmIAvDbNb6Ep A...  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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2
124

Blood supply and venous drainage of the gastro-intestinal tract and liver

This is a short audio-visual presentation on the vascular anatomy of the GI tract  
Mr Raymond Buick
over 8 years ago
30065
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Arterial Blood Gas Interpretation

This video tutorial outlines arterial blood gas interpretation in different physiological scenarios.  
Podmedics
almost 8 years ago
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Arterial Blood Gas procedure

How to safely take an ABG sample from a patient, also available free online at instamedic,co.uk  
Instamedic Revision
almost 7 years ago
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21

Haemodynamics

It kinda describes the flow of fluids in the body e.g. blood It might not be too descriptive or too accurate but I thought I should share in case it helps some other medical student out there  
Chinyere Udeh
almost 7 years ago