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Venepuncture - How to take blood - OSCE guide

Venepuncture is something every medic needs master, because you'll be required to perform this task frequently in clinical practice and it often appears as an OSCE station. This video takes you through the full procedure step by step. See the written guide alongside the video at http://www.geekymedics.com/osce/venepuncture-how-to-take-blood/ Like us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/geekymedics Also follow us on twitter at http://www.twitter.com/geekymedics Contact us at geekymedics@gmail.com with any questions or feedback. Always refer to your local medical school / hospital guidance before applying any of the steps demonstrated in this video guide.  
OSCE Videos
over 5 years ago
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122

Easy Cardiac Auscultation | Intro S3 S4 S1 S2: Heart Sounds Tutorial (2/7)

Audio Flashcards to practice cardiac gallop auscultation: http://www.helphippo.com/flash/flashcards.html Introduction to heart sounds, including the abnormal atrial and ventricular gallops of S3/S4. Explains sounds from the aortic, pulmonary, tricuspid and mitral valves. Please SUBSCRIBE for new videos: more cool stuff coming as we get more Hippo Helpers! Playlist to hear recorded S3 and S4 heart sounds (with our mnemonic comments beneath the uploaders' notes:): http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLE41F03008E1E5A80 Cardiac/Respiratory Playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLIPkjUW-piR0QD_IsxkMTRA0LxdOcwJN6 First part of our tutorial series (cardiac blood flow): http://youtu.be/fNwtsl1rP48 If you're confused by Kentucky/Tennessee: http://youtu.be/QlH6Thr0Ago Next part of our tutorial series (heart murmurs): http://youtu.be/rcHtce4t3ak More "extra heart sounds" (ie S2 splitting): http://youtu.be/Nz54yqldtR8 Clinical skills tutorial playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLIPkjUW-piR0-F25ydO8uI8DbHzuJKIcQ Visit: http://helphippo.com for archived videos, organized by topic/school year.  
HelpHippo.com
over 5 years ago
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55

Blood Cultures - Full Process

Blood Cultures - Full Procedure The Blood Cultures procedure performed following official University Hospitals of Leicester (UHL) Guidelines Stage 1 - Consent 0:35 Stage 2 - Equipment 2:14 Stage 3 - Procedure 3:24 Stage 4 - After Care 9:59 http://leicesterclinicalskills.weebly.com  
Leicester Clinical Skills
over 5 years ago
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64

Blood supply to the Spinal Cord • Cardiovascular, Nervous System • AnatomyZone

Learn about the blood supply to the spinal cord in this 3D video anatomy tutorial.  
anatomyzone.com
over 5 years ago
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44

Compartment Syndrome

This is a syndrome that results from swelling of a muscle. The muscle is retained in its fixed volume fascia, however, and thus the swelling of the muscle causes occlusion of the blood supply. this can result in infarction, and can cause an ischaemic contraction known as Volkmann’s Ischaemic Contracture.   It typically occurs in the forearm and calf, but can also occur in the thigh and foot.    
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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111

Blood Groups

Need help with your Anatomy and Physiology I homework? In this animated and interactive object, learners examine ABO blood antigens and Rh antigens and their compatibility.  
wisc-online.com
over 5 years ago
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112

Animated Blood Types

Add a drop of anti-Rh antibodies (anti-D serum) to a drop of blood on a slide labeled Rh.  The Rh negative blood (shown above) will not clump, while the Rh positive blood (below) will show clumping:  
waynesword.palomar.edu
over 5 years ago
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Blood Gases

Arterial Blood Gas Sampling for OSCE revision  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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52

CARDIOVASCULAR DRUGS; STATINS & BLOOD THINNERS by Professor Fink

In this video lecture, Professor Fink reviews the pathophysiology of Cardiovascular Disease (describing relationships between atherosclerosis, increased risk...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
Static.www.bmj
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Interpreting raised serum prolactin results

A 29 year old woman working in a solicitor’s office presented with secondary amenorrhoea and was found to have a serum prolactin concentration of 2940 mIU/L (upper reference limit <600) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration of 5.2 mIU/L (reference range 0.27-4.2 mIU/L). She had a history of depression and had previously been treated for anxiety and hyperthyroidism. There was no history of acne or hirsutism, and, until eight months before presentation, her periods had been regular. Her body mass index (BMI) was 18 compared with 19.8 the previous year.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
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Cardiology - Coronary Blood Supply

https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan Twitter: https://twit...  
YouTube
about 5 years ago
Www.bmj
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Airway obstruction after the development of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis

A 67 year old white woman presented to her family doctor in January 2013 with a small asymptomatic thyroid swelling. Her serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentration was high (37 mIU/L; reference range 0.5-4.5) and serum free thyroxine was low (5.4 pmol/L; 10-21), consistent with a hypothyroid state. However, she had no clinical features of hypothyroidism. Ultrasonography of the neck showed diffuse hypoechoic enlargement of the thyroid gland, with no retrosternal extension. Her serum anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO) value was also high (>600 kU/L; <35 kU/L). These features were suggestive of autoimmune (Hashimoto’s) thyroiditis. She was advised to take thyroxine tablets (100 µg) daily, and after two months her neck swelling reduced in size and her serum TSH concentration normalised (1.2 mU/L).  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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109

Arterial Blood Gas primer- Clinical Respiratory Diseases & Critical Care Medicine, Seattle - Med 610 - University of Washington School of Medicine

Arterial blood gases play an important role in the work-up and management of critically ill patients and patients with a variety of pulmonary complaints and disorders. For example, they are used to guide the adjustment of ventilator parameters on mechanically ventilated patients and are also a standard part of the work-up of patients who present with unexplained hypoxemia or dyspnea. It is, therefore, important that students and physicians be able to interpret the results of arterial blood gas sampling, determine the patient's acid-base status and assess the adequacy of oxygenation.  
courses.washington.edu
over 4 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1dozpdh?1444774176
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Imagine a world where procrastination became a productive pastime…

Imagine a world where procrastination became a productive pastime… Procrastination, as it stands, is a core feature of the ‘human condition’ and most would argue that it is here to stay. However, what if we could hijack the time we spend playing Candy Crush saga and trick ourselves into contributing towards something tangible. Today, I wish to explore this possibility with you. The phrase ‘gamification’ is not a new or made up word (I promise) although I agree it does sound jarring and I certainly wouldn’t recommend trying to use it in a game of scrabble (yet). The phrase itself refers to the process of applying game thinking and game mechanics to non-game contexts to engage users in solving problems. For our purposes and for the purposes of this blog ‘problems’ will equate to promoting healthy living for our patients and maintaining our own medical education. For one reason or another, most people show addictive behaviour towards games especially when they incorporate persistent elements of progression, achievement and competition with others. The underlying psychology won’t be discussed here; call it escapism, call it procrastination, call it whatever you will. What I want you to realise is that every day millions of people spend hours tending to virtual farms and cyber families whilst competing vigorously with ‘online’ friends. If we can take the addictive aspects of these popular games and incorporate them in to the non-game contexts I indicated to above, we could potentially trick ourselves, and even perhaps our patients, into a better way of life. The first time I heard the phrase ‘gamification’ was only last year. I was in Paris attending the Doctors 2.0 conference listening to talks on how cutting edge technologies and the Internet had been (or were going to be) incorporated into healthcare. One example that stood out to me was a gaming app that intended to engage people with diabetes to record their blood sugars more regularly and also compete with themselves to achieve better sugar control. People who have the condition of Diabetes Mellitus are continuously reminded of their diet and their blood sugar levels. I am not diabetic myself, but it is not hard to realise that diet and sugar control is going to be an absolute nightmare for people with diabetes both from a practical and psychological standpoint. Cue the mySugr Compainion, an FDA approved mobile application that was created to incorporate the achievement and progression aspects of game design to help encourage people with diabetes to achieve better sugar control. The app was a novel concept that struck a chord with me due to its potential to appeal to the part in everyone’s brain that makes them sit down and play ‘just one more level’ of their favorite game or app. There are several other apps on the market that are games designed to encourage self testing of blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. There is even a paediatric example titled; “Monster Manor,” which was launched by the popular Sanofi UK (who previously released the FDA / CE approved iBGStar iPhone blood glucose monitor). So applying aspects of game design into disease management apps has anecdotally been shown to benefit young people with Diabetes. However, disease management is just one area where game-health apps have emerged. We are taught throughout medical school and beyond that disease prevention is obviously beneficial to both our patients and the health economy. Unsurprisingly, one of the best ways to prevent disease is to maintain health (either through exercise and / or healthy eating). A prominent example of an app that helps to engage users in exercising is ‘RunKeeper,’ a mobile app that enables people to track and publish their latest jog-around-the-park. The elements of game design are a little more subtle in this example but the ability to track your own progress and compete with others via social media share buttons certainly reminds me of similar features seen in most of today’s online games. Other examples of ‘healthy living apps’ are rife amongst the respective ‘app stores,’ and there seems to be ample opportunity for the appliance of gamification in this field. An example might be to incorporate aspects of game design into a smoking cessation app or weight loss helper. Perhaps the addictive quality of a well designed game-app could overpower the urge for confectionary or that ‘last cigarette’… The last area where I think ‘gamification’ could have a huge benefit is in (medical) education. Learning and revising are particularly susceptible to the rot of procrastination, so it goes without saying that many educational vendors have already attempted to incorporate fresh ways in which they can engage their users to put down the TV remote and pick up some knowledge for the exams. Meducation itself already has an area on its website entitled ‘Exam Room,’ where you can test yourself, track your progress and provide feedback on the questions you are given. I have always found this a far more addictive way to revise than sitting down with pen and paper to revise from a book. However, I feel there could be a far greater incorporation of game design in the field of medical education. Perhaps the absolute dream for like-minded gamers out there would be a super-gritty medical simulator that exposes you to common medical emergencies from the comfort of your own computer screen. I mean, my shiny new gaming console lets me pretend to be an elite solider deep behind enemy lines so why not let me pretend and practice to be a doctor too? You could even have feedback functionality to indicate where your management might have deviated from the optimum. Perhaps more sensibly, the potential also exists to build on the existing banks of online medical questions to incorporate further aspects of social media interaction, achievement unlocks and inter-player competition (because in case you hadn’t noticed, medics are a competitive breed). I have given a couple of very basic examples on how aspects of game design have emerged in recent health-related apps. I feel this phenomenon is in its infancy. The technology exists for so much more than the above, we just need to use our imagination… and learn how to code.  
Dr. Luke Farmery
over 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 37skir?1444774198
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Biohacking - The Brighter Side of Health

2014 is already more than a month old (if you can believe it) and with each passing day, the world we live in is speeding towards breakthroughs in every sphere of life. We're running full tilt, wanting to be bigger and better than we were the day or the hour before. Every passing day reinvents the 'cutting edge' of technology, including medical progress and advancement. Gone are the medieval days when doctors were considered all knowing deities, while medicine consisted of leeches being used to drain 'bad blood'. Nowadays, health isn't just about waiting around until you pick up an infection, then going to your local GP to get treated; in today's world it's all about sustaining your wellbeing. And for that, the new kid on the block is biohacking. Biohacking is the art and science of maximizing your biological potential. As a hacker aims to gain complete control of the system he's trying to infiltrate, be it social or technological; similarly a biohacker aims to obtain full control of his own biology. Simply put, a biohacker looks for techniques to improve himself and his way of life. Before you let your imagination run away with you and start thinking of genetic experiments gone wrong, let me assure you that a biohack is really just about any activity you can do to increase your capabilities or advance your wellbeing. Exercising daily can be a biohack. So can doing the crossword or solving math sums, if it raises your IQ by a few points or improves your general knowledge. What characterizes biohacking is the end goal and the consequent modification of activities to achieve that goal. So what kind of goals would a biohacker have? World domination? Not quite. Adding more productive hours to the day and more productivity to those hours? Check. Eliminating stress and it's causes from their lives? Check. Improving mood, memory and recall, and general happiness? You bet. So the question arises; aren't we all biohackers of sorts? After all, the above mentioned objectives are what everyone aspires to achieve in their lives at one point or the other. unfortunately for all the lazy people out there (including yours truly), biohacking involves being just a tad bit more pro active than just scribbling down a list of such goals as New Year resolutions! There are two main approaches to selecting a biohack that works for you- the biggest aim and the biggest gain. The biggest aim would be targeting those capabilities, an improvement in which would greatly benefit you. This could be as specific as improving your public speaking skills or as general as working upon your diet so you feel more fit and alert. In today's competitive, cut throat world, even the slightest edge can ensure that you reach the finish line first. The biggest gain would be to choose a technique that is low cost- in other words, one that is beneficial yet doesn't burn a hole through your pocket! It isn't possible to give a detailed description of all the methods pioneering biohackers have initiated, but here are some general areas that you can try to upgrade in your life: Hack your diet- They say you are what you eat. Your energy levels are related to what you eat, when you take your meals, the quantity you consume etc. your mood and mental wellbeing is greatly affected by your diet. I could go on and on, but this point is self expanatory. You need to hack your diet! Eat healthier and live longer. Hack your brain- Our minds are capable of incredible things when they're trained to function productively. Had this not been the case, you and I would still be sitting in our respective caves, shivering and waiting for someone to think long enough to discover fire. You don't have to be a neuroscientist to improve your mental performance-studies show that simply knowing you have the power to improve your intelligence is the first step to doing it. Hack your abilities- Your mindset often determines your capacity to rise to a challenge and your ability to achieve. For instance, if you're told that you can't achieve a certain goal because you're a woman, or because you're black or you're too fat or too short, well obviously you're bound to restrict yourself in a mental prison of your own shortcomings. But it's a brave new world so push yourself further. Try something new, be that tacking on an extra lap to your daily exercise routine or squeezing out the extra time to do some volunteer work. Your talents should keep growing right along with you. Hack your age- You might not be able to do much about those birthday candles that just keep adding up...but you can certainly hack how 'old' you feel. Instead of buying in on the notion that you decline as you grow older, look around you. Even simple things such as breathing and stamina building exercises can change the way you age. We have a responsibility to ourselves and to those around us to live our lives to the fullest. So maximise your potential, push against your boundaries, build the learning curve as you go along. After all, health isn't just the absence of disease but complete physical, mental and social wellbeing and biohacking seems to be Yellow Brick Road leading right to it!  
Huda Qadir
over 5 years ago
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Associate Degree Nursing Physiology Review

Circulatory System Functions of the Heart Blood flow Through the Heart Cardiac Muscle Cells Intrinsic Conduction System Cardiac impulse Excitation-Contraction Conduction Pathway Electrocardiogram Cardiac Cycle Heart Sounds Cardiac Output Factors Affecting Cardiac Output -- Preload -- --Contractility -----Afterload Regulation of the Heart Primary control factors of the heart Congestive Heart Failure  
austincc.edu
almost 4 years ago
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Orthostatic Hypotension - American Family Physician

Orthostatic hypotension is a physical finding defined by the American Autonomic Society and the American Academy of Neurology as a systolic blood pressure decrease of at least 20 mm Hg or a diastolic blood pressure decrease of at least 10 mm Hg within three minutes of standing. The condition, which may be symptomatic or asymptomatic, is encountered commonly in family medicine. In healthy persons, muscle contraction increases venous return of blood to the heart through one-way valves that prevent blood from pooling in dependent parts of the body. The autonomic nervous system responds to changes in position by constricting veins and arteries and increasing heart rate and cardiac contractility. When these mechanisms are faulty or if the patient is hypovolemic, orthostatic hypotension may occur. In persons with orthostatic hypotension, gravitational opposition to venous return causes a decrease in blood pressure and threatens cerebral ischemia. Several potential causes of orthostatic hypotension include medications; non-neurogenic causes such as impaired venous return, hypovolemia, and cardiac insufficiency; and neurogenic causes such as multisystem atrophy and diabetic neuropathy. Treatment generally is aimed at the underlying cause, and a variety of pharmacologic or nonpharmacologic treatments may relieve symptoms.  
aafp.org
over 3 years ago
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What are the sources of blood supply of the AV node?

This video is part of a playlist of short videos which are intended to combine multiple choice questions' answering experience with an improved understanding...  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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39

How is venous blood collected from heart wall?

This video is part of a playlist of short videos which are intended to combine multiple choice questions' answering experience with an improved understanding...  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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39

How the Heart Works?

How the Heart Works? An animation showing the anatomy of the heart how blood pumps through its chambers, valves and ventricles, highlighting each one's funct...  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago