New to Meducation?
Sign up
Already signed up? Log In

Category

0
1
52

Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection: Diagnosis

Discussion of what is the difference between a CVC infection and a catheter-related blood stream infection. They are treated differently so it is important to know the difference.  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
about 9 years ago
7
1
37

Blood Products

Blood products:   pRBCs, fresh frozen plasma, platelets, cryoprecipitate when and how should we use it?  What are the risks?  You may order them like IV fluids but do you really know how these potentially deadly products are to be used.   
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
about 9 years ago
2
1
34

Blood Conservation in the ICU

When should a patient receive a transfuse of blood? What is an acceptable hemoglobin concentration in an ICU patient and should we use EPO?   Summer is a time when the blood banks often have a single day's worth of blood.  Perhaps with more conservative transfusion practices we can avoid or certainly help with some of the blood shortages.   Everyone wants to put patients on Epo, but does it increase the hemoglobin concentration enough to off set its high cost?  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
about 9 years ago
1
1
74

Podcast: Arterial blood gases

From wikipedia: “An arterial blood gas (ABG) is a blood test that is primarily performed using blood from an artery. It involves puncturing an artery with a thin needle and syringe and drawing a small volume of blood. The most common puncture site is the radial artery at the wrist, but sometimes the femoral artery [...]  
Medical Educator
about 9 years ago
1
1
193

Chronic Pulmonary Aspergillosis by David Denning

Prof. Denning describes chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA) as a long-term invasive disease, generally episodic in nature. Common symptoms are cough, shortness of breath, weight loss, tiredness, coughing up blood and aching or discomfort of the chest.  
Aspergillus Website
about 9 years ago
Preview
1
54

Blood Cultures - Procedure only

Blood Cultures performed following University Hospitals of Leicester (UHL) guidelines. This video demonstrates how to perform the procedure only. If you want a more in depth video visit our website or youtube page. http://leicesterclinicalskills.weebly.com/  
Leicester Clinical Skills
almost 6 years ago
8
1
11

Boxmedicine - Arterial blood gas interpretation (in 3 easy steps)

Do ABGs confuse you? Here is a presentation of 3 simple steps with a colour-coding system to deconfuddle you. It is so simple. Or perhaps you're already good at them? There are 13 examples that you will be walked-through. Press pause and play to test yourself against the tutor's interpretation. More tutorials at www.boxmedicine.com.  
Mr Danny Sinitsky
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
13

Blood Flow Examples

 
hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
25

Spinal Cord Compression

Physiology and anatomy The spinal cord runs from C1 (junction with the medulla), to about L1, where it becomes the cauda equina. Note that it terminates lower down in children – the spinal cord cannot grow as well as the rest of the body! The spinal cord gets its blood supply mainly from the vertebral arteries.    
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
12

Plasma Osmolality and Salt Balance

Water moves freely between compartments and the distribution is determined by the osmotic equilibrium between them. The dilution of plasma is described as plasma osmolality. The more diluted the plasma is, the lower the osmolality. Plasma osmolality is detected by osmoreceptors in the hypothalamus of the brain. The normal plasma osmolality is 285-300mOsmol/kg.  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
20

Hepatitis C

This is unusual as hepatitis viruses go, as it very rarely causes acute infection. People will only become aware of infection when they develop serious liver disease later in life. 80% of those exposed to the virus will develop chronic infection. Spontaneous late clearance of the disease is very rare. Blood transfusion and blood products are a major means of transmission. It is also though that it can be sexually transmitted, but this is not particularly common.  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
16

Extradural Haemorrhage

Extradural Haemorrhage aka Epidural Haemorrhage Blood collects between the dura mater and the bone of the skull. The dura is stripped away from the skull – indicating a high pressure bleed. On CT and MRI, it has a classical lentiform (lens) shaped appearance.   Pathology  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
60

Stroke

Stroke Stroke is a sudden onset of brain dysfunction, caused by an alteration in cerebrovascular blood supply. It is characterised by: Rapid, acute onset – within a few minutes Focal neurological defect – almost always some sort of hemiplegia, with/without other focal neurological signs  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
28

Physiological Changes of the Heart at Birth

Fetal circulation The fetus receives blood via the umbilical vein. Once this enters the body, it travels through the liver as the ductus venosus before joining the inferior vena cava. It allows 80% of fetal blood to bypass the liver on return from the placenta. It closes functionally within minutes of birth, and structurally within a couple of weeks (may take longer in pre-term babies) Becomes the ligamentus venosum  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
20

Hepatitis type D, E, F G

• Detected in some HBV infections.;The antigen is found within certain HBsAg particles. • In blood, HDV (delta agent) contains delta-Ag (HDAg) surrounded by an…  
SlideShare
over 5 years ago
3
1
19

CIRCULATORY CHANGES AT BIRTH

2. Ductus venosus … fetal blood vessel connecting the umbilical vein to the IVC … blood flow regulated via sphincter … carries mostly hi oxygenated blood  
mcb.berkeley.edu
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
23

Physiology Tutorial - Blood Flow

The task of maintaining an adequate interstitial homeostasis (the proper nutritional environment surrounding all cells in your body) requires that blood flows almost continuously through each of the millions of capillaries in the body. The following is a brief description of the parameters that govern flow through a given vessel. All bloods vessels have certain lengths (L) and internal radii (r) through which blood flows when the pressure in the inlet and outlet are unequal (Pi and Po respectively); in other words there is a pressure difference (ΔP) between the vessel ends, which supplies the driving force for flow. Because friction develops between moving blood and the stationary vessels walls, this fluid movement has a given resistance (vascular), which is the measure of how difficult it is to move blood through a vessel. One can then describe a relative relationship between vascular flow, the pressure difference, and resistance (i.e., the basic flow equation):  
vhlab.umn.edu
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
16

Video of arterial blood gas sampling technique

This video shows how an arterial blood gas sampling technique is done to check levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.  
dnatube.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
41

Blood Slides

The LIONS have been recently and suddenly forced to migrate with the wildebeests to new web server software, so everything is kinda messed up in the LION DEN right now. HINT: Change the URL from "lionden.com" to "lionden.info" to view the old "legacy" Lion Den (until I get this one fully tamed).  
lionden.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
27

Store doping samples for 10 years to stop sports cheats, say anti-doping bodies

Blood and urine samples taken from athletes to check for doping should be stored for 10 years to enable technology to catch up with substances that currently evade detection, international anti-doping experts have said.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago