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Liver Anatomy and Blood Supply

http://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Image: https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B8Ss3-wJfHrpNnczTF9xMTVZSVE/edit?usp=sharing  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 6 years ago
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700

Cardiac conduction system and its relationship with ECG

The heart's conductions system controls the generation and propagation of electric signals or action potentials causing the hearts muscles to contract and the heart to pump blood.  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 6 years ago
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Boxmedicine - Arterial blood gas interpretation (in 3 easy steps)

Do ABGs confuse you? Here is a presentation of 3 simple steps with a colour-coding system to deconfuddle you. It is so simple. Or perhaps you're already good at them? There are 13 examples that you will be walked-through. Press pause and play to test yourself against the tutor's interpretation. More tutorials at www.boxmedicine.com.  
Mr Danny Sinitsky
over 5 years ago
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13

Blood Flow Examples

 
hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu
almost 6 years ago
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arterial-blood-gas

Do ABGs confuse you? Here is a presentation of 3 simple steps with a colour-coding system to deconfuddle you. Or perhaps you're already good at them? There are 13 examples that you will be walked-through. Press pause and play to test yourself against the tutor's interpretation.  
boxmedicine.com
over 5 years ago
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64

Blood supply to the Spinal Cord • Cardiovascular, Nervous System • AnatomyZone

Learn about the blood supply to the spinal cord in this 3D video anatomy tutorial.  
anatomyzone.com
over 5 years ago
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2
44

Compartment Syndrome

This is a syndrome that results from swelling of a muscle. The muscle is retained in its fixed volume fascia, however, and thus the swelling of the muscle causes occlusion of the blood supply. this can result in infarction, and can cause an ischaemic contraction known as Volkmann’s Ischaemic Contracture.   It typically occurs in the forearm and calf, but can also occur in the thigh and foot.    
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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82

SLE - Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

SLE (Systemic Lupus Erythematosus) is an autoimmune connective tissue disease, similar to systemic sclerosis, RA, and mixed connective tissue disease. Often, symptoms of these diseases overlap. In cases where you unable to distinguish exactly which condition is present,we would normally say that mixed connective tissue disease is present.   Like those other disorders, ANA’s (anti-nuclear antibodies) can be found in blood of many affected patients.    
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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Spinal Cord Compression

Physiology and anatomy The spinal cord runs from C1 (junction with the medulla), to about L1, where it becomes the cauda equina. Note that it terminates lower down in children – the spinal cord cannot grow as well as the rest of the body! The spinal cord gets its blood supply mainly from the vertebral arteries.    
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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Plasma Osmolality and Salt Balance

Water moves freely between compartments and the distribution is determined by the osmotic equilibrium between them. The dilution of plasma is described as plasma osmolality. The more diluted the plasma is, the lower the osmolality. Plasma osmolality is detected by osmoreceptors in the hypothalamus of the brain. The normal plasma osmolality is 285-300mOsmol/kg.  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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Haematopoiesis - Blood Cell Formation

All blood cells develop from haemocytoblasts The process is called haematopoiesis (sometimes just haemopoiesis) Haemocytoblasts are also known as pluripotential stem cells. These cells can replicate themselves as well as differentiate into other cells, thus providing the constant supply of blood cells. The turnover of cells is very quick:  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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129

Clinical Consequences of Liver Disease

Vitamins A, D, E and K are all stored in the liver, as is vitamin B12. Therefore, in liver damage, you can’t store as many of these as you would like to.   Portal circulation Note that there are no valves in the portal circulation. The portal supply is 70% of the blood that the liver receives. The other 30% is supplied by the hepatic artery.   The four main veins that contribute to the portal system are: Splenic vein Superior mesenteric  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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Hepatitis C

This is unusual as hepatitis viruses go, as it very rarely causes acute infection. People will only become aware of infection when they develop serious liver disease later in life. 80% of those exposed to the virus will develop chronic infection. Spontaneous late clearance of the disease is very rare. Blood transfusion and blood products are a major means of transmission. It is also though that it can be sexually transmitted, but this is not particularly common.  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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Extradural Haemorrhage

Extradural Haemorrhage aka Epidural Haemorrhage Blood collects between the dura mater and the bone of the skull. The dura is stripped away from the skull – indicating a high pressure bleed. On CT and MRI, it has a classical lentiform (lens) shaped appearance.   Pathology  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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60

Stroke

Stroke Stroke is a sudden onset of brain dysfunction, caused by an alteration in cerebrovascular blood supply. It is characterised by: Rapid, acute onset – within a few minutes Focal neurological defect – almost always some sort of hemiplegia, with/without other focal neurological signs  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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115

Heart Failure

Heart Failure is... Inability of the heart to pump adequate amounts of blood to meet the body's metabolic demands End stage of all heart diseases Accounts for 5 in 1000 hospital admission each year in the UK   Terms;  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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Physiological Changes of the Heart at Birth

Fetal circulation The fetus receives blood via the umbilical vein. Once this enters the body, it travels through the liver as the ductus venosus before joining the inferior vena cava. It allows 80% of fetal blood to bypass the liver on return from the placenta. It closes functionally within minutes of birth, and structurally within a couple of weeks (may take longer in pre-term babies) Becomes the ligamentus venosum  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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155

Sepsis and SIRS

Definitions. Before discussing SIRS along with the various sepsis syndromes, it is important to understand some basic definitions. Infection: This is the inflammatory response initiated by the presence of a micro-organisms in normally sterile tissue. Bacteraemia: The presence of live bacteria in the blood stream. This can occur in a healthy individual and present with no symptoms. Common causes include surgery, dental procedures and even tooth brushing.  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
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Fetal Circulation Right Before Birth

Watch how the blood flows through the fetal circulation and compare it to what happens in the baby's body.  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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Hepatitis B/ Chronic Hepatitis/Serum Hepatitis

• In the family Hepadnaviridae; common name: Hepadnavirus • Known as the smallest DNA virus • Double stranded, circular 42 nm DNA genome;Virion also called Dan…  
SlideShare
over 5 years ago