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CesareanSection

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Step 7 - Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding

Every facility providing maternity services and care for newborn infants should: Practice rooming-in - allow mothers and infants to remain together - 24 hours a day. Mothers with normal babies (including those born by caesarean section) should stay with them in the same room day and night, except for periods of up to an hour for hospital procedures, from the time they come to their room after delivery (or from when they were able to respond to their babies in the case of caesareans). It should start no later than one hour after normal vaginal deliveries. Normal postpartum mothers should have their babies with them or in cots by their bedside unless separation is indicated. The seventh step about rooming--in is very important. Unless medically indicated, the baby remains with the mother 24 hours a day. Unless the mother is heavily sedated, she keeps the baby next to her in her bed. More inf http://tensteps.org/step-7-successful-breastfeeding.shtml --.-- Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding - Video Series Babies who are breastfed are generally healthier and achieve optimal growth and development compared to those who are fed formula milk. If the vast majority of babies were exclusively fed breastmilk in their first six months of life -- meaning only breastmilk and no other liquids or solids, not even water -- it is estimated that the lives of at least 1.2 million children would be saved every year. If children continue to be breastfed up to two years and beyond, the health and development of millions of children would be greatly improved. This video series aims to raise awareness, encourage early adoption, promote training of health care staff, and build capacity for, and to stimulate dialogue about, breastfeeding and its impact on the public, in a range of community and public contexts in low- and middle-income countries. Our goal is to have these ten steps in every facility providing maternal services and care for newborn infants. Videos, presentations, research, evidence, papers, training and counselling materials, tools, and many other related and supporting resources are available. Visit us on-line a http://tensteps.org .  
Nand Wadhwani
almost 9 years ago
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8

High caesarean section figures in Northern Ireland questioned - BBC News

Stormont's spending watchdog questions whether the high number of caesarean sections in Northern Ireland's hospitals is to save time rather than money.  
BBC News
over 5 years ago
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16

Woman from Sunderland could have Caesarean without consent - BBC News

A court rules a pregnant woman who suffers from a psychotic disorder can be given a caesarean section without her consent.  
BBC News
over 5 years ago
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0
10

WHO | Caesarean sections should only be performed when medically necessary

​​10 APRIL 2015 | GENEVA - Caesarean section is one of the most common surgeries in the world, with rates continuing to rise, particularly in high- and middle-income countries. Although it can save lives, caesarean section is often performed without medical need, putting women and their babies at-risk of short- and long-term health problems. A new statement from the World Health Organization (WHO) underscores the importance of focusing on the needs of the patient, on a case by case basis, and discourages the practice of aiming for “target rates”.  
who.int
over 4 years ago
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16

Pre surgery preparation for diabetic pregnant woman for Elective Caesarean section

Prepare for USMLE,UK,CANADIAN,AUSTRALIAN, NURSING & OTHER MEDICAL BOARD examinations around the globe with us.Understand the basics, concepts and how to answ...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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8

Inducing labor at full term not associated with higher C-section rates

As cesarean section rates continue to climb in the United States, researchers are looking to understand the factors that might contribute.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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10

Too many obstetrics beds in NYC hospitals: Cost to city is $26.4 million per year

Reducing cesarean section rates, even by a small percentage, would lead to large savings by reducing need for inpatient bedsResearchers at Columbia University's Mailman...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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28

Perimortem Cesarean Section in the Emergency Department

Guest post by Greg Press   The second perimortem C-section of my career happened last week. The  
emupdates.com
over 4 years ago
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14

NHS trust is charged with corporate manslaughter over woman’s death after emergency caesarean

Prosecutors have launched a corporate manslaughter prosecution against an NHS trust in the case of a 30 year old primary school teacher who died after an emergency caesarean section.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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13

Diet and exercise in pregnancy for preventing gestational diabetes mellitus | Cochrane

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is high blood glucose (hyperglycaemia) first occurring or first recognised during pregnancy. Between 1% and 14% of pregnant women develop GDM, with some at a higher risk than others (for example, women who are overweight or obese, older, of particular ethnicities, have had GDM previously, or have a family history of type II diabetes). GDM can cause significant health problems for mothers and babies. The babies may grow very large and, as a result, be injured at birth, or cause injury to mothers during birth. Women with GDM have an increased risk of having an induced birth, of their babies being born by caesarean section, and of having a preterm birth (before 37 weeks of pregnancy). Additionally, there can be long-term health problems for mothers and babies, including an increased risk of type II diabetes. Some diets (for example, those with low fibre and high glycaemic load) and physical inactivity, are potentially modifiable risk factors for GDM. There is evidence that lifestyle interventions in the general population (promoting diet and exercise changes) can prevent type II diabetes, and it has been suggested that these interventions may help prevent GDM in pregnancy.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
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8

Use of fetal scalp blood lactate for assessing fetal well-being during labour | Cochrane

A fetal heart rate that is abnormal or not reassuring during labour may be caused by the inability of the baby to adapt to decreases in oxygen supply during the birth. Inadequate oxygen supply may lead to the development of acidosis (low pH levels) and increased lactate in the blood. After the amniotic membranes have ruptured and the cervix dilated to around 3 cm, it is possible to measure lactate (or pH) levels in a sample of blood taken from the baby's scalp. A much smaller amount of blood is needed for the lactate test than to measure pH. This review identified two studies of 3348 mother-baby pairs that compared lactate and pH testing in labour. Lactate testing was more likely to be successful than pH testing, but with no differences in newborn outcomes, including the number of babies with low Apgar scores, low pH in their cord blood or admissions to the neonatal intensive care nursery. There were no differences in the number of mothers having caesarean sections, forceps or vacuum births between the two groups. We conclude that lactate testing in labour may be more likely to be successfully achieved than pH testing.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
0
15

Endometriosis is linked to greater risk of complications in pregnancy and birth, study finds

Women with endometriosis have a higher risk of miscarriage and ectopic pregnancy, a large cohort study in Scotland has found. Women with the condition who maintain a pregnancy for more than 24 weeks face further risks, including a higher risk of placenta praevia, bleeding before and after birth, and caesarean section.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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14

Routine ultrasound in late pregnancy (after 24 weeks' gestation) to assess the effects on the infant and maternal outcomes | Cochrane

Ultrasound can be used as a clinical diagnostic tool in late pregnancy to assess the baby's condition when there are complications, or to detect problems which may not otherwise be apparent. If such problems are identified this may lead to changes in care and an improved outcome for babies. Carrying out scans on all women is however controversial. Screening all women may mean that the number of interventions is increased without benefit to mothers or babies. Although popular, women may not fully understand the purpose of their scan and may be either falsely reassured, or unprepared for adverse findings. Existing evidence shows that routine ultrasound, after 24 weeks' gestation, in low-risk or unselected women does not provide any benefit for the mother or her baby. Thirteen studies involving 34,980 women who were randomly selected to screening or a control group (no or selective ultrasound, or ultrasound with concealed results) contributed to the review. The quality of trials was satisfactory. There were no differences between groups in the rates of women having additional scans, antenatal admissions, preterm delivery less than 37 weeks, induction of labour, instrumental deliveries or caesarean section. Babies’ birthweight, condition at birth, interventions such as resuscitation, and admission to special care were similar between groups. Infant survival, with or without congenital abnormalities, was no different with and without routine ultrasound screening in late pregnancy. None of the trials reported on the effect of routine ultrasound in late pregnancy on preterm birth less than 34 weeks, maternal psychology or mental development of babies when two years old.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
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12

Quick versus standard vaginal birth when a baby is bottom-down | Cochrane

The best outcomes in childbirth for both mothers and babies are when babies are born head-first. If the baby is in another position, there is a higher risk of complications including the need for caesarean section. In a ‘breech presentation’ the unborn baby is bottom-down instead of head-down. This review looked for evidence about whether a quicker birth might be better in such cases.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
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9

Planned caesarean section for term breech delivery | Cochrane

Babies are usually born head first. If the baby is in another position the birth may be complicated. In a ‘breech presentation’ the unborn baby is bottom-down instead of head-down. Babies born bottom-first are more likely to be harmed during a normal (vaginal) birth than those born head-first. For instance, the baby might not get enough oxygen during the birth. Having a planned caesarean may reduce these problems. We looked at evidence comparing planned caesarean sections and vaginal births at the normal time of birth.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
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10

External cephalic version for breech presentation before term | Cochrane

Babies born bottom first (in the breech position) may have more problems during birth than those who are born head first (in the cephalic position) because there may be some delay in birth of the head and pressure on the umbilical cord as the head passes through the birth canal. During an external cephalic version (ECV) a breech baby is turned to the head down position by gently pushing on the mother's abdomen. Research shows that ECV after 37 weeks reduces the number of babies in the breech position at full term, and the number of caesarean sections.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
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10

'Microbial birthday suit' for C-section babies - BBC News

Those worried about the health impacts of Caesarean sections say babies born that way miss out on the health benefits of a natural birth. Now, as Alanna Collen writes in this week's Scrubbing Up, some experts are suggesting a simple swab could mean that doesn't have to be the case.  
bbc.co.uk
about 4 years ago
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Caesarean section | Guidance and guidelines | NICE

This guideline will shortly be checked to see if it needs updating, please register as a stakeholder to be informed about the decision.  
nice.org.uk
about 4 years ago
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7

Fear of Childbirth and Elective Cesarean Section

Does fear of childbirth exert a strong impact on the preference for elective cesarean section?  
medscape.com
about 4 years ago
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7

Specialised antenatal clinics for women with a multiple pregnancy for improving maternal and infant outcomes | Cochrane

Women carrying more than one baby are at increased risk of complications in pregnancy, which can affect the health of both mother and babies. 'Specialised' antenatal clinics have been suggested for women with a multiple pregnancy as a means of improving health outcomes for women and their infants. The review found one randomised trial involving 162 women with a multiple pregnancy. For most important outcomes the evidence was not available, or was graded very low quality due to imprecise estimates, the small sample size of the single study providing data and low numbers of events for some outcomes. There were no significant differences identified between specialised antenatal care and standard care in the chance of a baby dying in the first month of life. Women receiving specialised antenatal care were significantly more likely to give birth by caesarean section. Further information from well-designed trials reporting outcomes for women and their infants are required.  
cochrane.org
about 4 years ago