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9
641

Biochemistry of Carbohydrates

Video was part of 2014 Summer Scholarship Project with CSIRO called "The Hungry Microbiome" For more visit: http://www.csiro.au/hungrymicrobiome/ https://www...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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7
264

Biochemistry Help: The Cori Cycle

The Cori Cycle is responsible for removing excess Lactic acid or Lactate from the muscle. It is then uptaken by the Liver where it is converted back into Pyruvate, then into Glucose again. This video explains how!  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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4
190

Glycolysis Mnemonic Animation (2/5): Easy Biochemistry Introduction Tutorial

Easy glycolysis mnemonic for beginning students. You may need to pause/watch it more than once - and there's a self-paced FLASHCARD TUTORIAL at: http://www.helphippo.com/flash/flashcards.html All cellular respiration tutorials can be found in our playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLIPkjUW-piR0Bsauys9qL-UNZ2dPVPeGE This tutorial introduces simplified intermediates structures/ ATP/NADH steps - the next part of our tutorial has the full structures/enzyme names. Please SUBSCRIBE for new videos: more cool stuff coming as we get more Hippo Helpers! This explanation also explains the difference between the investment and pay-off stages of glycolysis, as well as the important regulatory step, the "committed" step of phosphofructokinase-1. http://www.helphippo.com - for more video tutorials organized by topic/year.  
HelpHippo.com
over 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 kphjit?1444774023
4
4073

Acids and bases as a balancing act to sustain life

This is an excerpt from "Fluids and Electrolytes Made Incredibly Easy! 1st UK Edition" by William N. Scott. For more information, or to purchase your copy, visit: http://tiny.cc/Fande. Save 15% (and get free P&P) on this, and a whole host of other LWW titles at lww.co.uk when you use the code MEDUCATION when you check out! Introduction The chemical reactions that sustain life depend on a delicate balance – or homeostasis – between acids and bases in the body. Even a slight imbalance can profoundly affect metabolism and essential body functions. Several conditions, such as infection or trauma, and certain medications can affect acid-base balance. However, to understand this balance, you need to understand some basic chemistry. Understanding pH Understanding acids and bases requires an understanding of pH, a calculation based on the concentration of hydrogen ions in a solution. It may also be defi ned as the amount of acid or base within a solution. Acids consist of molecules that can give up, or donate, hydrogen ions to other molecules. Carbonic acid is an acid that occurs naturally in the body. Bases consist of molecules that can accept hydrogen ions; bicarbonate is one example of a base. A solution that contains more base than acid has fewer hydrogen ions, so it has a higher pH. A solution with a pH above 7 is a base, or alkaline. A solution that contains more acid than base has more hydrogen ions, so it has a lower pH. A solution with a pH below 7 is an acid, or acidotic. Getting your PhD in pH A patient’s acid-base balance can be assessed if the pH of their blood is known. Because arterial blood is usually used to measure pH, this discussion focuses on arterial samples. Arterial blood is normally slightly alkaline, ranging from 7.35 to 7.45. A pH level within that range represents a balance between the concentration of hydrogen ions and bicarbonate ions. The pH of blood is generally maintained in a ratio of 20 parts bicarbonate to 1 part carbonic acid. A pH below 6.8 or above 7.8 is usually fatal. Too low Under certain conditions, the pH of arterial blood may deviate significantly from its normal narrow range. If the blood’s hydrogen ion concentration increases or bicarbonate level decreases, pH may decrease. In either case, a decrease in pH below 7.35 signals acidosis. Too high If the blood’s bicarbonate level increases or hydrogen ion concentration decreases, pH may rise. In either case, an increase in pH above 7.45 signals alkalosis. Regulating acids and bases A person’s well-being depends on their ability to maintain a normal pH. A deviation in pH can compromise essential body processes, including electrolyte balance, activity of critical enzymes, muscle contraction and basic cellular function. The body normally maintains pH within a narrow range by carefully balancing acidic and alkaline elements. When one aspect of that balancing act breaks down, the body can’t maintain a healthy pH as easily, and problems arise.  
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
about 7 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 2hilgx?1444774083
4
1052

So you want to be a medical student: READ THIS!

There are so many sources for advice out there for potential medical students. So many books, so many forums, so many careers advice people, and so many confusing and scary myths, that I thought it might be useful to just put up some simple guidelines on what is required to become a medical student and a short book list to get your started. I am now in my 5th year at university and my 4th year of actual medicine. Since getting into Medical School in 2009 I have gone back to my 6th form college in South Wales at least once a year to talk to the students who wanted to become medical or dental students, to offer some advice, answer any queries that I could. This year, I tried to to do the same sort of thing for high achieving pupils at my old comprehensive, because if you don't get the right advice young enough then you won't be able to do everything that is required of you to get into Medical school straight after your A-levels. Unfortunately, due to some new rules I wasn't allowed to. So, since I couldn't give any advice in person I thought that a blog might be the easiest alternative way to give young comprehensive students a guide in the right direction. So here goes... How to get into medical school: You must show that you have the academic capacity to cope with the huge volume of information that will try to teach you and that you have the determination/tenacity to achieve what you need to. To show this you must get good grades: a. >8A*s at GCSE + separate science modules if possible = you have to be able to do science. b. >3A’s at A-Level = Chemistry + Biology + anything else you want, as long as you can get an A. 2. You must have an understanding of what Medicine really involves: a. Work experience with a doctor – local GP, hospital work experience day, family connections, school connections – you should try to get as much as you can but don’t worry if you can’t because you can make up for it in other areas. b. Work experience with any health care professional – ask to see what a nurse/ physio/ health care assistant/ phlebotomist/ ward secretary does. Any exposure to the clinical environment will give you an insight into what happens and gives you something to talk about during personal statements and interviews. c. Caring experience – apply to help out in local care homes, in disabled people’s homes, at charities, look after younger pupils at school. All these sorts of things help to show that you are dedicated, motivated and that you want to help people. 3. Be a fully rounded human being: a. Medical schools do not want robots! They want students who are smart but who are also able to engage with the common man. So hobbies and interests are a good way of showing that you are more than just a learner. b. Playing on sports teams allows you to write about how you have developed as a person and helps you develop essential characteristics like team work, fair play, learning to follow commands, learning to think for yourself, hand-eye co-ordination etc. etc. All valuable for a career in medicine. c. Playing an instrument again shows an ability to learn and the will power to sit and perfect a skill. It also provides you with useful skills that you can use to be sociable and make friends, such as joining student choirs, orchestras and bands or just playing some tunes at a party. d. Do fun things! Medicine is hard work so you need to be able to do something that will help you relax and allow you to blow off some stress. All work and no play, makes a burnt out wreck! 4. Have a basic knowledge of: a. The news, especially the health news – Daily Telegraph health section on a Monday, BBC news etc. b. The career of a doctor – how does it work? How many years of training? What roles would you do? What exams do you need to pass? How many years at medical school? c. The GMC – know about the “Tomorrow’s Doctor” Document – search google. d. The BMA e. The Department of Health and NHS structure – know the basics! GP commissioning bodies, strategic health authorities. f. What the Medical School you are applying to specialises in, does it do lots of cancer research? Does it do dissection? Does it pride itself on the number of GPs it produces? Does it require extra entry exams or what is the interview process? These 4 points are very basic and are just a very rough guide to consider for anyone applying to become a medical student. There are many more things you can do and loads of useful little tips that you will pick up along the way. If anyone has any great tips they would like to share then please do leave them as a comment below! My final thought for this blog is; READ, READ and READ some more. I am sure that the reason I got into medical school was because I had read so many inspiring and thought provoking books, I had something to say in interviews and I had already had ideas planted in my head by the books that I could then bring up for discussion with the interview panel when asked about ethical dilemmas or where medicine is going. Plus reading books about medicine can be so inspiring that they really can push your life in a whole new direction or just give you something to chat about with friends and family. Everyone loves to chat people – how they work, why they are ill, what shapes peoples' personalities etc and these are all a part of medicine that you can read into! Book Recommendations Must reads: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Trust-Me-Im-Junior-Doctor/dp/0340962054/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374240729&sr=1-1&keywords=trust+me+i%27m+a+junior+doctor http://www.amazon.co.uk/Rise-Fall-Modern-Medicine/dp/0349123756/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374240763&sr=1-1&keywords=the+rise+and+fall+of+modern+medicine http://www.amazon.co.uk/Selfish-Gene-30th-Anniversary/dp/0199291152/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374240793&sr=1-1&keywords=the+selfish+gene http://student.bmj.com/student/student-bmj.html http://www.newscientist.com/subs/offer?pg=bdlecpyhvyhuk1306&prom=1234&gclid=CLT0tZ3Wu7gCFfLHtAodWwUAyA http://www.amazon.co.uk/Man-Who-Mistook-His-Wife/dp/B005M1NBYY/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374240909&sr=1-3&keywords=the+man+who+mistook+his+wife+for+a+hat http://www.amazon.co.uk/Better-Surgeons-Performance-Atul-Gawande/dp/1861976577/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374240987&sr=1-1&keywords=better+atul+gawande http://www.amazon.co.uk/House-Black-Swan-Samuel-Shem/dp/0552991228/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374241124&sr=1-1&keywords=the+house+of+god+samuel+shem http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bad-Science-Ben-Goldacre/dp/000728487X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374241298&sr=1-1&keywords=bad+science+ben+goldacre Thought provokers: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Complications-Surgeons-Notes-Imperfect-Science/dp/1846681324/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374241026&sr=1-1&keywords=atul+gawande+complications http://www.amazon.co.uk/Checklist-Manifesto-How-Things-Right/dp/1846683149/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374241049&sr=1-1&keywords=atul+gawande+checklist http://www.amazon.co.uk/Brave-New-World-Aldous-Huxley/dp/0099518473/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374241067&sr=1-1&keywords=aldous+huxley http://www.amazon.co.uk/Island-Aldous-Huxley/dp/0099477777/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374241093&sr=1-1&keywords=aldous+huxley+island http://www.amazon.co.uk/Mount-Misery-Samuel-Shem/dp/055277622X/ref=pd_sim_b_4 http://www.amazon.co.uk/Psychopath-Test-Jon-Ronson/dp/0330492276/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374241180&sr=1-1&keywords=the+psychopath+test http://www.amazon.co.uk/Drugs-Without-Minimising-Harms-Illegal/dp/1906860165/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374241197&sr=1-1&keywords=drugs+without+the+hot+air http://www.amazon.co.uk/How-Win-Friends-Influence-People/dp/0091906814/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1374241222&sr=1-1&keywords=how+to+win+friends+and+influence+people http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bad-Pharma-companies-mislead-patients/dp/0007350740/ref=pd_bxgy_b_img_y Final Final Thought: Just go into your local book shop or library and go to the pop-science section and read the first thing that takes your interest! It will almost always give you something to talk about.  
jacob matthews
almost 7 years ago
Preview
3
100

CARBOHYDRATES & FATTY ACIDS by Professor Fink

Review of Biological Chemistry, including Carbohydrates (monosaccharides, disaccharides & polysaccharides) and Lipids (saturated & unsaturated fatty acids). ...  
YouTube
almost 6 years ago
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3
31

Principles of Medical Physiology

This book has been specifically designed with the needs of the student in mind. Lengthy explanations are avoided and the material is presented in a concise form that not only makes it easy to understand but also easy to remember and reproduce, which is precisely what the student needs. Key features - Short chapters are organized in the sequence preferred by most physiology teachers - The contents of each chapter are tailored to provide just enough material for a single lecture (occasionally two lectures), making it very handy for teachers. (The book contains 120 chapters) - Basics of relevant physics and chemistry are made extremely simple. This is welcomed by both physiology teachers and students, for efficient teaching and learning - Schematic diagrams in 3D perspective are employed to elucidate difficult anatomical concepts, including the gross structure of the brain - Simple analogies of difficult concepts are given, often comically illustrated. Apparent paradoxes are highlighted and simple answers are provided - Difficult topics are presented with elegant simplicity and brevity without compromising on the core concepts. These include membrane electrophysiology, electromyography, hemostatic balance, electrocardiography, cardiac output, hemodynamics, respiratory mechanics, counter-current multiplier system, body fluid and electrolyte balance, gastric acid secretion, calcitropic hormones, fetoplacental unit, memory and learning, synaptic transmission and sensorimotor mechanisms  
books.google.co.uk
about 5 years ago
Preview
2
33

Chemistry of Mephedrone

Professor Dave at York University outlines how this "legal high" works in the body and why it may be more dangerous than a lot of members of the general public think.  
Rhys Clement
about 10 years ago
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2
49

multiple choice exam in both Biology and Chemistry

multiple choice exam in both Biology and Chemistry  
Mr Adam Max
almost 8 years ago
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2
19

Chemistry Revision VI - Stoichiometry Balancing Equation

http://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan  
Nicole Chalmers
over 6 years ago
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1
33

Chemistry Revision VI - Molar Concept

http://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan  
Nicole Chalmers
over 6 years ago
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1
46

Chemistry Revision - Ions (Cation, Anion, Bonds)

http://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan  
Nicole Chalmers
over 6 years ago
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1
48

Chemistry Revision - Elements and Atoms

http://armandoh.org/  
Nicole Chalmers
over 6 years ago
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1
15

Cheese Making and Cake Baking: The Chemistry of Cookery - The Naked Scientists

Naked Scientists - 24th Sep 2011 - Cheese Making and Cake Baking: The Chemistry of Cookery  
thenakedscientists.com
about 6 years ago
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1
18

Chemistry By Design - The Naked Scientists

Naked Scientists - 13th Aug 2011 - Chemistry By Design  
thenakedscientists.com
about 6 years ago
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1
39

Biochemistry - Regulation of blood glucose Part 02

The online lecture series for medical students. On demand streaming video lectures. www.mdcrack.tv Owner: MD CRACK  
YouTube
about 6 years ago
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1
143

AMINO ACIDS & PROTEINS by Professor Fink

Review of Biological Chemistry, including Amino Acids and Proteins. Reference is made to the globular structure of the protein, denaturation back into a poly...  
YouTube
almost 6 years ago