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8
3
135

Altered Level of Consciousness

<p><span style="color: #333333; font-size: small;">This episode covers an approach to children with altered level of consciousness. &nbsp;We present an approach to the initial management in these cases, with a focus on the ABC and DFG approach. Investigations and imaging are discussed. Some specific causes of altered LOC are covered. &nbsp;This episode was written by Peter MacPherson and Dr. Melanie Lewis. Peter is a medical student at the University of Alberta. Dr. Lewis is a general pediatrician and an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Alberta and Stollery Children's Hospital. She is also the Clerkship Director.&nbsp;</span></p <p><span style="color: #333333; font-size: small;">~~~</span></p <p><!--StartFragment--></p <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Times;"><span style="font-size: small;"> <!--StartFragment--> </span></span></p <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Differential Diagnosis of Altered Level of Consciousness:</span></p <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">1) Structural causes: cerebrovascular accident, cerebral vein thrombosis, hydrocephalus, intracerebral tumor, subdural empyema, trauma (intracranial hemorrhage, diffuse cerebral swelling, abusive head trauma/shaken baby syndrome)</span></p <p class="MsoNormal"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">2) Medical causes: anoxia, diabetic ketoacidosis, electrolyte abnormality, encephalopathy, hypoglycemia, hypothermia or hyperthermia, infection (sepsis), inborn errors of metabolism, intussusception, meningitis or encephalitis, psychogenic, postictal state, toxins, uremia (hemolytic-uremic syndrome)</span></p <div style="border: none; border-bottom: solid windowtext .75pt; padding: 0in 0in 1.0pt 0in;" <p class="MsoNormal" style="border: none; mso-border-bottom-alt: solid windowtext .75pt; padding: 0in; mso-padding-alt: 0in 0in 1.0pt 0in;"><span style="font-family: Verdana;">Adapted from: Avner J (2006) Altered states of consciousness. <em>Pediatr Rev</em></span><span style="font-family: Verdana;"> 27: 331-338.</span></p </div <p>&nbsp;</p>  
Pedscases.Com
about 11 years ago
6
2
74

Evaluation of limp

<p><span style="font-size: 11px; color: #333333;">This podcast gives students an approach to the evaluation of limp in children and provides an oveview of a number of common or serious causes of limp. &nbsp;This podcast was written by Peter MacPherson and &nbsp;Dr. Janet Ellsworth. Peter is a medical student at the University of Alberta. Dr. Ellsworth is the Divisional Director of pediatric rheumatology at the Stollery Children&rsquo;s Hospital in Edmonton and a Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Alberta. These podcasts are designed to give medical students an overview of key topics in pediatrics. The audio versions are accessible on iTunes. You can find more great pediatrics content at www.pedscases.com.</span></p>  
Pedscases.Com
about 11 years ago
1
1
67

Interview with Dr. Matthew Horton, Pathologist Part 2: Neuroendocrine Lung Tumors and Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma (audio)

<p><font face="'Lucida Grande', Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="3"><span style="font-size: 11px; white-space: pre-wrap;"><span style="font-family: Times; font-size: medium; white-space: normal;" <div style="color: #000000; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; background-image: initial; background-repeat: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-color: #ffffff; background-position: initial initial; margin: 8px;" <p><font face="'Lucida Grande', Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif" size="3"><span style="font-size: 11px; white-space: pre-wrap;"><span style="font-family: arial, sans, sans-serif; font-size: 13px;">Dr. Matthew Horton, specialist in lung pathology at CellNetix in Seattle, WA, discusses the neuroendocrine spectrum of lung tumors and the evolving views on bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC).</span></span></font></p </div </span></span></font></p>  
Howard (Jack) West, MD
about 11 years ago
13
1
27

The Emerging Role of Molecular Markers in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: a Webinar by Dr. Nathan Pennell (audio)

<p><span style="font-family: Times; font-size: medium;"> </span></p <div style="color: #000000; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; background-image: initial; background-repeat: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-color: #ffffff; background-position: initial initial; margin: 8px;" <p><span style="font-family: arial, sans, sans-serif; font-size: small;"><span style="font-size: 13px; white-space: pre-wrap;"><span style="font-family: Times; font-size: medium; white-space: normal;"> </span></span></span></p <span style="font-family: arial, sans, sans-serif; font-size: small;" <div style="color: #000000; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 10px; background-image: initial; background-repeat: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-color: #ffffff; background-position: initial initial; margin: 8px;" <p><span style="font-family: arial, sans, sans-serif; font-size: small;"><span style="font-size: 13px; white-space: pre-wrap;">Dr. Nathan Pennell, medical oncologist and lung cancer expert at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, reviews the current evidence and future directions for use of molecular markers such as EGFR, KRAS, ERCC-1, EML4-ALK, and others in NSCLC.</span></span></p </div </span <p>&nbsp;</p </div <p>&nbsp;</p>  
Howard (Jack) West, MD
about 11 years ago
12
0
229

Priapism and Hematuria

<p>Why is a 12 hour erection a bad thing? How should we manage the patient with bloody urine? A curbside consult with urologist Brian Shaffer, MD.&nbsp;</p <p>Your emails</p <p>An unusual southern accent</p <p>and much more...</p <p>&nbsp;</p <p><em><strong><span style="font-size: x-large; color: #0000ff;">Urology Primer</span></strong></em></p <p>&nbsp;</p <p><strong><span style="font-size: large;">Priapism<span style="font-size: 10px; font-weight: normal;">&nbsp;a rare condition that causes a persistent, and often painful, penile erection.</span></span></strong></p <p>&nbsp;</p <p>Priapism is drug induced, injury related, or caused by disease, not sexual desire. As in a normal erection, the penis fills with blood and becomes erect. However, unlike a normal erection that dissipates after sexual activity ends, the persistent erection caused by priapism is maintained because the blood in the penile shaft does not drain. The shaft remains hard, while the tip of the penis is soft. If it is not relieved promptly, priapism can lead to permanent scarring of the penis and inability to have a normal erection.</p <p>&nbsp;</p <p><strong><span style="font-size: large;">Clot retention</span></strong></p <p>blood clots in the bladder prevent urine emptying</p <p>&nbsp;</p <p><span style="font-size: large;"><strong>Coude Catheter</strong></span></p <p>a semi-rigid catheter that has a curve or bend at the tip. The curved tip allows it to navigate over the curvature of the prostate or any other urethral obstruction it may encounter. A Coude catheter is specifically designed for this purpose. Coude catheters are available in size 8 French to size 26 French.</p <p>&nbsp;</p <p><strong><span style="font-size: large;">De Novo</span></strong></p <p>The Latin expression de novo literally means something akin to "from the beginning" or "anew"</p <p>&nbsp;</p <p><strong><span style="font-size: large;">Interstitial cystitis</span></strong></p <p>also called painful bladder syndrome &mdash; is a chronic condition characterized by a combination of uncomfortable bladder pressure, bladder pain and sometimes pain in your pelvis, which can range from mild burning or discomfort to severe pain.</p <p>&nbsp;</p <p><strong><span style="font-size: large;">Cystoscopy</span></strong></p <p>the use of a scope (cystoscope) to examine the bladder. This is done either to look at the bladder for abnormalities or to help with surgery being performed on the inside of the urinary tract (transurethral surgery).</p <p>&nbsp;</p <p><strong><span style="font-size: large;">CT Urogram</span></strong></p <p>A urogram is a radiograph, or X-ray image, of the urinary tract.&nbsp;</p <p>&nbsp;</p <p><strong><span style="font-size: large;">TURP</span></strong></p <p>transurethral resection of the prostate</p <p>&nbsp;</p <p><strong><span style="font-size: large;">Foley catheter</span></strong></p <p>a thin, sterile tube inserted into the bladder to drain urine. Because it can be left in place in the bladder for a period of time, it is also called an indwelling catheter. It is held in place with a balloon at the end, which is filled with sterile water to hold it in place. The urine drains into a bag and can then be taken from an outlet device to be drained</p <p>&nbsp;</p <p>&nbsp;</p>  
Rob Orman, MD
about 11 years ago