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32

Textbook of Basic Nursing

Now in its Ninth Edition, this comprehensive all-in-one textbook covers the basic LPN/LVN curriculum and all content areas of the NCLEX-PN®. Coverage includes anatomy and physiology, nursing process, growth and development, nursing skills, and pharmacology, as well as medical-surgical, maternal-neonatal, pediatric, and psychiatric-mental health nursing. The book is written in a student-friendly style and has an attractive full-color design, with numerous illustrations, tables, and boxes. Bound-in multimedia CD-ROMs include audio pronunciations, clinical simulations, videos, animations, and a simulated NCLEX-PN® exam. This edition's comprehensive ancillary package includes curriculum materials, PowerPoint slides, lesson plans, and a test generator of NCLEX-PN®-style questions.  
Google Books
almost 5 years ago
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The Complete Guide to Vascular Ultrasound

This volume is a comprehensive how-to guide to ultrasound evaluation of vascular pathology. The book provides both the technical know-how and the analytical skills needed to obtain the maximum information from examinations and to accurately diagnose a given problem. Chapters provide detailed coverage of abdominal vasculature, peripheral arteries, hemodialysis and bypass grafts, peripheral veins, penile vessels, and the cerebrovascular system. Each chapter includes sections on anatomy, pathology, questions to ask the patient, examination techniques, diagnostic analysis, and other diagnostic tests related to the clinical problem. More than 100 full-color Doppler images demonstrate the full spectrum of pathologic findings.  
Google Books
almost 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 t4jn?1444773937
9
357

Death by Powerpoint.

Introduction Computerised presentations are a part of every medical student's / junior doctor's life. Sometimes we give them, often we sleep through them and occasionally we even listen to them. They are the backbone of medical education besides traditional bed-side teaching, having rapidly replaced the now extinct OHR (Over Head Projector) acetate-sheet presentations of years gone-by. The problem is that Doctors and medical students often struggle with creating and presenting coherent slides. This is most probably due to the general apathy most have for actually talking in front of an audience, or because those asked to present are often taken unawares, and therefore have little time to prepare. In these times of avolition or last-minute hurriedness, people often reach out for the industry standard of presentation production: PowerPoint. PowerPoint is the most commonly used tool for making presentations because it is simple to use and comes with a whole load of free templates. Unfortunately, most of these templates look disgusting. If a template doesn't look disgusting, then it is most certainly overused and you run the risk of having a presentation that looks identical to the student before you at the weekly seminar teaching - a scenario that can be easily likened to turning up to a lecture wearing exactly the same clothes as another person in the room, which would just be awkward. Another problem with PowerPoint is the phenomenon of 'Death By Powerpoint,' which refers to the general boredom and apathy experienced by those who have received way too much information in way too short a space of time via a series of over-cramped, poorly stylised slides. But why on earth do you care? People should care about 'Death By Powerpoint' because if your presentations cause people to zone out, then you are not getting your message across. And if you aren't getting your message across then you. are. not. presenting. at. all. (take a moment to reflect on that particularly Zen statement). Let me explain using a metaphor, if I am a sales person and I present my talk with well-designed slides, in an enthusiastic and well-rehersed manner to an appropriate audience I will make more sales than if I present using poorly designed slides at the last minute. Similarly, in Medicine if I present well designed, aesthetic slides I am more likely to convey accurate information to my colleagues that may very well be retained and enjoyed by all involved. Of course, this blog assumes a degree of presentation-related Altruism. The recommendations I am about to make require you to 'step out of the mould' and say 'no' to poor presentations. They require you to forgive others for the presentations they have inflicted on you in the past. You will 'lead by example'. Unfortunately I am not capable (or qualified) to make you an excellent designer, nor can I give you the motivation to feel as passionately about design aesthetics as i do when all you've got to do is slam some slides together for your monthly journal club. But what I can do is present to you a series of resources that might tempt you away from the horrific PowerPoint templates that currently infest medical student seminars and young doctors presentations. If you really couldn't care less, then I suggest using Prezi, a website where you can make quite eccentric looking presentations rapidly and for free. The only problem is that Prezi became cliched even before its debut and you risk inflicting travel sickness on your poor audience, what with all the funky zooming in and out of slides that occurs during a typical Prezi presentation (you will know what I mean if you've ever seen one). So, without further ado, here are my top 5 tips for making your presentations look smoother and more polished... Irrespective of whether the contents of your talk are any good. Step One: Typography Get yourself a good font. Typography is really important, when you speak to someone you use a variety of tones and gestures to convey the meaning of the words you are using. Fonts are effectively the printed version of your tone and gestures. Good font choice can help give 'umph' to a particular point in your presentation and help give character to what you are saying. Of course, it's important to remain professional so 'Wingbats' might not be your first choice, but anything that you could envisage on a nice business card is probably a good shout. Fonts are usually something you have to pay for if you want anything beyond the set given to you when you download Microsoft Word (for example). However, there are whole hosts of free fonts available from sites like [dafont])(http://www.dafont.com). The key is to be willing to trawl through these sites to find fonts that are actually useful! Beware those fancy fonts unless you know your audience can take it! If you are stuck on choosing a font, which is a common complaint, then maybe this flow diagram will help! Oh yeah, and never ever use Comic Sans. Ever. Step Two: Colour A good font isn't going to get you very far on its own. You need a solid colour scheme to bring your presentation alive. It seems blunt to say, but some people are not very good at picking colours that go well with one another. This is well evidenced in PowerPoint presentations where the yellow-text-on-blue-background is far too common. I mean yeah, in theory blue and yellow 'compliment' each other, but thats where the relationship between blue and yellow should stay... in theory. Luckily there are some useful colour palette websites available out there, which will match colours for you... Step Three: Structure After you've picked a sensible font and a suitable colour scheme, it's time to think about the structure or layout of your slides. It's absolutely crucial that you avoid putting too much information on your slides even if you are giving an academic presentation. An overloaded slide is about as useful as a dead cat. At this point, some of you may be tempted to resort to those dodgy PowerPoint default templates but there is another way! There are sites out there that have some pretty fresh templates you can use and they are completely free! They are sure to add a bit of spice to your slide's aesthetic. There will probably be a separate tutorial on this in the future, but basic principles apply. As a general rule stick to Left Alignment *and avoid *Central Alignment like the plague. Step Four: Imagery Images help to spice up a presentation, but try and keep them related to the topic. Google Images is a great resource but remember that most images will be a low resolution and will be poorly suited to being shown blown up full-size on a presentation screen. Low resolution images are a presentation killer and should be avoided at all costs. For high-quality images try sites like Flikr or ShutterStock. Step Five: Consider Software The interface of Powerpoint does not lend itself well to having images dropped in and played with to make nice looking layouts. I would recommend Adobe Photoshop for this kind of work, but not everyone will have access to such expensive software. Cheap alternatives include Photoshop Elements amongst others. Once you have created slides in Photoshop it is quick and easy to save them as JPEG files and drag and drop them into PowePoint. Perhaps that can be a tutorial for another time... Step 5: Additional Stuff Presentations typically lack significance, structure, simplicity and rehearsal. Always check over your presentation and ask 'is this significant to my audience?' Always structure your presentation in a logical manner and (it is recommended you) include a contents slide and summary slide to tie things together. Keep your verbal commentary simple and keep the slides themselves even more simple than that. Simplicity is crucial. Once you have produced your beautiful slides with wonderful content you will want to practice them. Practice, Practice, Practice. Rehearsing even just once can make a good presentation even better. Conclusion: This blog entry has covered some basic points on how to improve your medical presentations and has given a series of useful online resources. Putting effort into designing a presentation takes time and motivation, for those without these vital ingredients we recommend Prezi (whilst it is still relatively new and fresh). Perhaps the rest of you will only use these tips for the occasional important presentation. However, I hope that soon after you start approaching presentations with a little more respect for their importance and potential, you too will find a desire to produce high-quality, aesthetically pleasing talks. LARF - Mood: damn tired and feeling guilty that I just wrote this blog instead of revising haematology notes. Follow me on Twitter. Follow the Occipital Designs original blog. Check out my Arterial Schematic.  
Dr. Luke Farmery
almost 7 years ago
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Early Twitter Vets Launch Color Genomics To Make Genetic Screenings For Breast Cancer Affordable

I'm always excited when an experienced team from the consumer mobile world crosses over into a complex and formidable area like healthcare or biotech. With..  
techcrunch.com
over 4 years ago
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Pleural Effusion Explained Clearly | 3 of 3

Learn the key points of pleural effusions with this clear explanation by Dr. Roger Seheult. Video 3 of 3 includes discussion on pleural fluid analysis (color...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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Body clock sensitive to color of light

For the first time, researchers show that the body clock of mammals can distinguish dawn and twilight not just because of differences in intensity but also in colors of the light.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
Boiled spinach
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Episode 10 – Pediatric GI Emergencies

Episode 10 (iTunes or listen here) The Free Open Access Medical education (FOAM) We review Dr. Natalie May's brilliant post on the St. Emlyn's blog, "When Sick Means Sick: Emesemantics and Vomiting in Kids"  in which she dissects emesis descriptors such as bilious, projectile, and coffee-ground. The Pearls: Ask for color descriptors or look at the emesis yourself rather…  
foamcast.org
over 4 years ago
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New National Report Underscores Health and Economic Benefits of Clean Energy to People of Color and Low-Income Communities

Last week, the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) released an important new report,  
huffingtonpost.com
over 4 years ago
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Bedside Clinics in Surgery

This second edition brings trainees fully up to date with the latest advances in general surgery. Each section has been fully revised and covers numerous disorders within each specialty. The new edition features an additional section on surgical anatomy and an extended section on operative surgery. More than 800 clinical photographs, X-rays, diagrams and figures enhance learning. Colour images illustrate clinical signs and instruments for laparoscopic surgery, with schematic diagrams used in the first edition, now replaced by photographs. Key points Second edition presenting recent advances in general surgery Fully revised with addition of two new sections Includes more than 800 clinical photographs and diagrams Previous edition published in 2004  
books.google.co.uk
over 4 years ago
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Liver Pathology

This unique book provides detailed insight into a wealth of expert experience in liver pathology, with an in-depth review of the expertÌs analysis and diagnostic process supported by high-quality color photomicrographs and discussion of the diagnostic principles involved in evaluating these lesions. The diagnostic problems and cases selected show the wide range of specimens seen in liver pathology and address the difficult issues in diagnosis encountered in these lesions. Chapters and cases are authored by many of the leading experts and educators in liver pathology today. Liver Pathology will be essential reading for every pathologist who evaluates liver pathology specimens. In addition it will be a valuable resource for pathology residents and fellows. All Consultant Pathology Titles Provide: Actual consultation cases and expert analysis Expert analysis provides a detailed discussion of the reasoning behind the diagnosis of each case Comprehensive coverage of challenging diagnoses The cases are richly illustrated with high-quality photomicrographs  
books.google.co.uk
over 4 years ago
8f0a7f4f4b806d5fbc07c218c3bc078bab6cb2fb08951574676538243
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GI tract diseases

Simplified drawing for the pathologies affecting the gastrointestinal tract. Each color refers to a disease (start from the key of colors).  
nedaa kiwan
over 4 years ago
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Clinical symptoms, signs and tests for identification of impending and current water-loss dehydration in older people | Cochrane

Water-loss dehydration results from drinking too little fluid. It is common in older people and associated with increased risk of many health problems. We wanted to find out whether simple tests (like skin turgor, dry mouth, urine colour and bioelectrical impedance) can usefully tell us whether an older person (aged at least 65 years) is drinking enough. Within the review we assessed 67 different tests, but no tests were consistently useful in telling us whether older people are drinking enough, or are dehydrated. Some tests did appear useful in some studies, and these promising tests should be re-checked to see whether they are useful in specific older populations. There was sufficient evidence to suggest that some tests should not be used to indicate dehydration. Tests that should not be used include dry mouth, feeling thirsty, heart rate, urine colour, and urine volume.  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
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General Anatomy and Musculoskeletal System (THIEME Atlas of Anatomy)

Setting a new standard for the study of anatomy, the THIEME Atlas of Anatomy, with access to WinkingSkull.com PLUS, is more than a collection of anatomical images--it is an indispensable resource for anyone who works with the human body.Praise for the THIEME Atlas of Anatomy: General Anatomy and Musculoskeletal System: This atlas contains superior illustrations of the musculoskeletal system of the trunk, upper, and lower extremities, as well as a concise but very informative overview of general anatomical concepts. --American Association of Anatomists News Features: An innovative, user-friendly format in which each two-page spread presents a self-contained guide to a specific topic 1,700 original, full-color illustrations and 100 tables present comprehensive coverage of the musculoskeletal system, general anatomy, surface anatomy, and embryology Hundreds of clinical applications emphasize the vital link between anatomical structure and function Expertly rendered cross-sections, x-rays, and CT and MRI scans vividly demonstrate clinical anatomy Clearly labeled images help the reader easily identify each structure Summary tables appear throughout -- ideal for rapid review A scratch-off code provides access to WinkingSkull.com PLUS, an interactive online study aid, featuring over 600 full-color anatomy illustrations and radiographs, labels-on, labels-off functionality, and timed self-tests The THIEME Atlas of Anatomy series also features Neck and Internal Organs and Head and Neuroanatomy. Each atlas is available in softcover and hardcover and includes access to WinkingSkull.com PLUS.Use the General Anatomy and Musculoskeletal System Image Collection to enhance your lectures and presentations; illustrations can be easily imported into presentation software and viewed with or without labeling.  
books.google.co.uk
over 4 years ago
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Jones' Clinical Paediatric Surgery

Jones' Clinical Paediatric Surgery provides clear-sighted advice on the surgical options available for young patients.Building on the popular and successful style of previous editions, this fully revised seventh edition employs a systematic approach to the childhood diseases that need surgical treatment. It includes more case vignettes and colour photographs, expanded coverage on the use of imaging, and updated approaches to management including laparoscopic operations. Key subject areas are supported by case vignettes in a familiar format similar to what might appear in an OSCE viva.Jones' Clinical Paediatric Surgery is the ideal guide for paeditricians, surgeons and trainees, as well as primary care physicians, junior doctors and medical students.  
books.google.co.uk
over 4 years ago
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Nursing Practice

Nursing Practice is the essential, textbook to support you throughout your entire nursing degree, from your first year onwards. It explores all the clinical and professional issues that you need to know in one complete volume. Written in the context of the latest Nursing and Midwifery Council Standards for Pre-Registration Nursing Education and the Essential Skills Clusters, this book covers all fields of nursing: Adult, Child, Mental Health, Learning Disabilities and also Maternity care, in both acute and community settings. With full colour illustrations, and plenty of activities and user-friendly features throughout, this evidence-based text encompasses essential nursing theory and practice, providing students with information to support their success. Learning features in the book include: Hear it from the experts- tips and advice from real life nurses, patients and their carers, and student nurses Red Flags- alerting the student to potential dangers Primary Care Considerations- informs students about care issues in the community setting Fields boxes- giving further insight into other fields of nursing, making the book relevant to all fields of nursing practice Medicines Management boxes provide key information about medicines Self-assessment and activities throughout A companion website to this title is available at www.wileynursingpractice.com Here you’ll find a range of resources for both the student and the lecturer, including: Over 350 interactive multiple choice questions Flashcards Glossary Links to references and further reading Illustrations from the book Worksheets  
books.google.co.uk
over 4 years ago
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Rubin's Pathology

Rubin's Pathology is a core textbook for medical students taking pathology. Pathology in medical school is generally taught in one of two ways: (1) as a year long course in the second year of medical school, covering principles and systems, or (2) as a two part course, beginning with fundamental principles in the first year of medical school and concluding with systems pathology in the second year of medical school. This text emphasizes concepts that a medical student needs to know without going into unnecessary detail. It features numerous high-quality images and superb four-color illustrations. A companion website offers valuable additional material to enhance learning and teaching.  
books.google.co.uk
over 4 years ago
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Health Check: Blue is the colour for sleeping sickness cure - BBC News

Scientists trying to eradicate the insect which spreads sleeping sickness in sub-Saharan Africa, have found that the tsetse fly has a weakness for the colour blue.  
bbc.co.uk
over 4 years ago
E319a0654de8a9dad54789d7945eb301e504807f4206472905499006
9
376

Cranial nerve nuclei in brainstem (schema)

One of my professors made this schema long time ago. I drew it again to add some colour. It helped me a lot to memorize everything. :)  
Sigyn
over 4 years ago
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5 Easy Steps To Get Home Remedies For Lighter Skin Tone !

We all are bestowed with deserving color, shape and features by nature. And, there are few things which should not be altered in any case. Obviously, Beau...  
acne.org
over 4 years ago