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CommunicableDiseases

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13
781

Infection summary

Summary of infection , covering immunology, infectious diseases and treatments  
Philip Welsby
over 8 years ago
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8
466

What is afterload?

Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy.  
khanacademy.org
almost 4 years ago
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7
201

Baby Circulation Right After Birth

Watch how the blood flows through the baby's circulation and compare it to what happens in the fetus. Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and w...  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
8
6
457

Acute Otitis Media

This podcast gives medical students an overview of the diagnosis and treatment of acute otitis media. This episode is a discussion between Peter MacPherson, a medical student at the University of Alberta, and Dr. Sarah Forgie, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at the Stollery Children's Hospital. This is one of many podcasts from Pedscases.com. These podcasts are designed to give medical students an overview of key topics in pediatrics. The audio versions are accessible on iTunes. You can find more great pediatrics content on www.pedscases.com.  
Pedscases.Com
about 9 years ago
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5
345

Pressure in the left heart - part 1

Watch the pressure in the left heart go up and down with every heart beat! Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy.  
khanacademy.org
almost 4 years ago
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4
321

Fetal Circulation Right Before Birth

Watch how the blood flows through the fetal circulation and compare it to what happens in the baby's body. Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician ...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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4
189

Poo transplants

When is it medically advisable to eat some one else's poo? When you need a poo transplant. Poo transplants could be the solution to one of the biggest problems facing the NHS today- the bacterial infection Clostridium difficile. C.diff, as it's known to its friends, infects about 18,000 people in England and Wales every year and is involved in the deaths of about 2000 people. C.diff typically arises due to imbalances in the normal gut bacteria. The gut is like a city, a city with about 100 trillion bacterial residents happily munching away on a banquet of bowel contents. The average person has about 1000 different types of bacteria in their gut, and about 3% of healthy adults have C.diff in that mix. The C.diff doesn't cause them any problems because its numbers are kept in check by the other gut bacteria. However treatment with broad spectrum antibiotics such as clindamycin, cephalosporins, ciprofloxacin and co-amoxiclav, can disrupt this happy community- killing off vast swathes of bacteria but crucially not the C.diff. Given free rein the C.diff multiplies rapidly and produces toxins which damage the gut. In some people this causes mild diarrhoea and abdominal pain, in others it can lead to torrential diarrhoea, perforation of the colon and death. Traditional treatment includes stopping any broad spectrum antibiotics and possibly prescribing antibiotics which target the C.diff such as metronidazole or vancomycin. However with antibiotic use comes the risk of resistance. Moreover our current approach isn't entirely effective and about 22% of patients treated suffer a recurrence. This can result in a cycle of illness and hospital admission which is costly to the patient and the hospital. So it's time to start thinking outside of the box. Cue the poo transplant. The thinking goes like this- if the cause of the problem is disruption to the normal community of gut bacteria, why not just pop those bacteria back in to crowd out the C.diff? Simples. Practically, the first step is to identify a donor, usually a close relative of the patient, and screen them for a range of infectious diseases and parasites. It's also advisable to make sure they haven't recently consumed anything the intended recipient is allergic to, before asking them to make their "donation". You then pop it in a household blender and blitz it down, adding saline or milk to achieve a slurry consistency. Next you need to strain your concoction to remove large materials- one medic in the UK uses coffee filters. Top tip. Then you're ready to administer it- about 25ml from above (e.g. via nasogastric tube), or 250ml from below. Now, its important to note that poo transplants are still an experimental treatment. To date only small case studies have been carried out, but with 200 total reported cases, an average cure rate of 96% and no serious adverse events reported to date, it's worth carrying out a large trial to assess it thoroughly. Poo transplants- arguably the ideal treatment for a cash strapped NHS. It's cheap, plentiful and it seems to work. Now to convince people to consume someone else's poo... Bottoms up! FYI: This was first posted on my own blog. Image Courtesy of Marcus007 at de.wikipedia [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons  
Dr Catherine Carver
over 6 years ago
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3
260

Bacterial Etiologies of Common Infections (Antibiotics - Lecture 2)

A summary of the role and composition of normal flora, the typical bacterial pathogens causing several common infectious diseases, diagnosis of UTI, and interpretation as to whether a positive blood culture represents true infection or contamination. Bonus points to anyone who can identify the mystery portrait.  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 6 years ago
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2
67

TB - an introduction to Infectious Diseases

This PowerPoint presentation compiles the content for an Exhibition entitled TB - an introduction to Infectious Diseases - currently displayed at St George's University of London Pathology Museum (pamphlet, images of specimens, poster). This interactive exhibition aimed to teach A-level, 'Access-to-Medicine' and Medical students about TB and infectious diseases. The exhibition was presented to a group of 'Access-to-Medicine' students whom enjoyed it immensely.  
Sophie Roberts
over 8 years ago
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2
35

Microbial Pathogenesis

The fact that infectious diseases claim over 17 million victims worldwide each year, along with the regular emergence of new drug resistance pathogens, signals that infectious diseases will continue to be a daily concern of the Physician well into the future. This reality requires that today's medical students develop a solid foundation in medical microbiology -- a foundation they can achieved by using IMS: Microbial Pathogenesis. This book is developed in response to the changing field of medical microbiology. The number of diseases and the diversity of microbial pathogens that cause these diseases are far too many for simple taxonomic organization. As a result, IMS Microbial Pathogenesis focuses on the common principles of infection rather than the old taxonomic organization, enabling a better long term retention of relevant material, and minimizing the short-term memorization of specific "factoids," many of which may become out-dated in a short time.  
books.google.co.uk
over 4 years ago
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2
99

Diagnostic Pathology: Infectious Diseases

Diagnostic Pathology: Infectious Diseases takes a comprehensive look at infectious diseases, their anatomic manifestations, and how to ensure a complete and accurate sign out at the microscope. A user-friendly chapter landscape and thousands of high-quality images combine to make this medical reference book a key companion for the general surgical pathologist or resident in training. Comprehensive discussions on how to sign out cases. Formatted into sections by organism type (Virus, Bacteria, Fungi, and Parasite), and further divided by those that can be diagnosed on histological appearance. Species-specific pathologies for finding "zebra" cases.Essential information is listed in a bulleted format with numerous high-quality images to facilitate learning."Key Facts" highlight the quick criteria needed for diagnosis or adequacy evaluation at the time of a procedure.Features clear pictures of diagnostic forms, ancillary diagnostic tools, including microbiology and molecular diagnostics, pathological reaction patterns expected for given organisms, and important common and uncommon pathogens.Explains when and when not to use molecular diagnostics, and discusses histological limitations and how to address them at sign out.  
books.google.co.uk
over 4 years ago
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1
39

WHO guidelines on Sodium and Potassium intake (Adults & Children)

The recent guidelines will be of interest to all physicians/internists/pediatricians who are concerned about non-communicable diseases ("life-style diseases").  
Dr Kannuvellil E Rajan
almost 7 years ago
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1
14

Einstein On: Antibiotic Resistance, Dr. Liise-anne Pirofski

http://www.einstein.yu.edu - Infectious disease expert Liise-anne Pirofski, M.D., explains how excess use of broad-spectrum antibiotics is one of the root ca...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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1
14

Antibiotic Stewardship: Changing the Culture

Physician-scientist, Dr. Liise-anne Pirofski, chief of infectious diseases of Albert Einstein College of Medicine, discusses the objectives of the Einstein-M...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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1
27

Community Medicine - Communicable diseases Part 1

The online lecture series for medical students. On demand streaming video lectures. www.mdcrack.tv Owner: MD CRACK  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
16

Whom should we “test and treat” for Helicobacter pylori?

The possibility that peptic ulcer and gastric cancer could be an infectious disease would have been dismissed as ridiculous 30 years ago. We now realise that Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of both. As H pylori infection has been implicated in various upper gastrointestinal diseases, testing for the bacterium non-invasively and treating infected individuals (“test and treat”) has become widespread. The key question is in which group of patients is this approach appropriate?  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
17

Whom should we “test and treat” for Helicobacter pylori?

The possibility that peptic ulcer and gastric cancer could be an infectious disease would have been dismissed as ridiculous 30 years ago. We now realise that Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of both. As H pylori infection has been implicated in various upper gastrointestinal diseases, testing for the bacterium non-invasively and treating infected individuals (“test and treat”) has become widespread. The key question is in which group of patients is this approach appropriate?  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
14

Whom should we “test and treat” for Helicobacter pylori?

The possibility that peptic ulcer and gastric cancer could be an infectious disease would have been dismissed as ridiculous 30 years ago. We now realise that Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of both. As H pylori infection has been implicated in various upper gastrointestinal diseases, testing for the bacterium non-invasively and treating infected individuals (“test and treat”) has become widespread. The key question is in which group of patients is this approach appropriate?  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
10

Whom should we “test and treat” for Helicobacter pylori?

The possibility that peptic ulcer and gastric cancer could be an infectious disease would have been dismissed as ridiculous 30 years ago. We now realise that Helicobacter pylori infection is the major cause of both. As H pylori infection has been implicated in various upper gastrointestinal diseases, testing for the bacterium non-invasively and treating infected individuals (“test and treat”) has become widespread. The key question is in which group of patients is this approach appropriate?  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
12

Candidemia/Invasive Candidiasis Treatment Algorithm

Developed and produced for http://www.MechanismsinMedicine.com Animation Description: The Infectious Diseases Society of America has developed guidelines for...  
YouTube
about 5 years ago