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CommunicableDiseases

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Www.bmj
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Global health agenda on non-communicable diseases: has WHO set a smart goal for physical activity?

Philipe de Souto Barreto argues that, to reduce premature mortality, policies should focus on getting fully inactive people to do a little physical activity rather than strive for the entire population to meet current physical activity recommendations  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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63

Abdul Ghafur: Adventurous, emotional, outspoken

Abdul Ghafur, consultant in infectious diseases at Apollo Hospital in Chennai, India, convened a meeting of the medical societies of India in 2012 that generated the Chennai Declaration, a plan to tackle the challenge of antibiotic resistance. He trained in India and then worked as a registrar at the Royal Free Hospital in London from 2003 to 2008. He argues that a perfect strategy for controlling antibiotics in developing countries may not be possible but that rules should be liberal at first, becoming gradually more restrictive. He is a member of the Longitude Prize Advisory Panel.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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7

Advancing Global Health Conference 2014: Dr. Regina Rabinovich (2 of 11)

http://www.einstein.yu.edu - Regina Rabinovich, M.D., M.P.H., ExxonMobil Malaria Scholar in Residence, department of immunology and infectious diseases at Ha...  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
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55

National Kidney Foundation Primer on Kidney Diseases

The National Kidney Foundation Primer on Kidney Diseases is your ideal companion in clinical nephrology! From anatomy, histology, and physiology, through the diagnosis and management of kidney disease, fluid and electrolyte disorders, hypertension, dialysis, and kidney transplantation, this trusted manual from Elsevier and the National Kidney Foundation provides an accessible, efficient overview of kidney diseases that's perfect for residency, fellowship, clinical practice, and board review. Incorporate the latest NKF Kidney/ Outcome Quality Initiative guidelines on chronic kidney disease staging and management. Review the basics with a current and practical review of the anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of kidney disease, fluid and electrolyte disorders, hypertension, dialysis, and renal transplantation. Put the latest knowledge to work in your practice with 8 brand-new chapters including kidney development, assessment of kidney function in acute and chronic settings, the kidney in malignancy, acute tubular injury and acute tubular necrosis, acute interstitial nephritis, Fabry Disease, immunosuppression, and transplant infectious disease, as well as comprehensive updates on acute kidney injury, transplant medicine, kidney function and kidney disease in the elderly, GFR estimation, biomarkers in kidney disease, recently described pathologic targets in membranous nephropathy, minimal change disease, viral nephropathies, and much more! Get expert advice from a new team of editors, led by Scott Gilbert and Dan Weiner from Tufts University School of Medicine, each bringing a fresh perspective and a wealth of clinical experience. Quickly access the complete contents online at Expert Consult, with fully searchable text, downloadable images, and additional figures and graphs.  
Google Books
over 4 years ago
Static.www.bmj
1
19

Germany, the G7, and global health

Remember global health? It had a fantastic 10 years from 2002-12—the “golden decade” of rising health aid1—but is now slipping down the international agenda. Some development experts argue that other sectors, such as agriculture, should “take centre stage.”2 This is misguided. Health investment is the largest contributor to sustainable development.3 And a retreat from health would threaten the impressive gains of the past decade in reducing infectious disease, maternal, and child mortality.4  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
13

Outbreak of swine flu in India is no worse than seasonal flu, say specialists

The outbreak of H1N1 influenza in India this year, which has killed 875 people since 1 January, is not yet a major concern because the incidence and mortality are no different from those caused by seasonal flu in developed countries such as the United States, infectious disease specialists have told The BMJ.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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7
201

Baby Circulation Right After Birth

Watch how the blood flows through the baby's circulation and compare it to what happens in the fetus. Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and w...  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
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189

Poo transplants

When is it medically advisable to eat some one else's poo? When you need a poo transplant. Poo transplants could be the solution to one of the biggest problems facing the NHS today- the bacterial infection Clostridium difficile. C.diff, as it's known to its friends, infects about 18,000 people in England and Wales every year and is involved in the deaths of about 2000 people. C.diff typically arises due to imbalances in the normal gut bacteria. The gut is like a city, a city with about 100 trillion bacterial residents happily munching away on a banquet of bowel contents. The average person has about 1000 different types of bacteria in their gut, and about 3% of healthy adults have C.diff in that mix. The C.diff doesn't cause them any problems because its numbers are kept in check by the other gut bacteria. However treatment with broad spectrum antibiotics such as clindamycin, cephalosporins, ciprofloxacin and co-amoxiclav, can disrupt this happy community- killing off vast swathes of bacteria but crucially not the C.diff. Given free rein the C.diff multiplies rapidly and produces toxins which damage the gut. In some people this causes mild diarrhoea and abdominal pain, in others it can lead to torrential diarrhoea, perforation of the colon and death. Traditional treatment includes stopping any broad spectrum antibiotics and possibly prescribing antibiotics which target the C.diff such as metronidazole or vancomycin. However with antibiotic use comes the risk of resistance. Moreover our current approach isn't entirely effective and about 22% of patients treated suffer a recurrence. This can result in a cycle of illness and hospital admission which is costly to the patient and the hospital. So it's time to start thinking outside of the box. Cue the poo transplant. The thinking goes like this- if the cause of the problem is disruption to the normal community of gut bacteria, why not just pop those bacteria back in to crowd out the C.diff? Simples. Practically, the first step is to identify a donor, usually a close relative of the patient, and screen them for a range of infectious diseases and parasites. It's also advisable to make sure they haven't recently consumed anything the intended recipient is allergic to, before asking them to make their "donation". You then pop it in a household blender and blitz it down, adding saline or milk to achieve a slurry consistency. Next you need to strain your concoction to remove large materials- one medic in the UK uses coffee filters. Top tip. Then you're ready to administer it- about 25ml from above (e.g. via nasogastric tube), or 250ml from below. Now, its important to note that poo transplants are still an experimental treatment. To date only small case studies have been carried out, but with 200 total reported cases, an average cure rate of 96% and no serious adverse events reported to date, it's worth carrying out a large trial to assess it thoroughly. Poo transplants- arguably the ideal treatment for a cash strapped NHS. It's cheap, plentiful and it seems to work. Now to convince people to consume someone else's poo... Bottoms up! FYI: This was first posted on my own blog. Image Courtesy of Marcus007 at de.wikipedia [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons  
Dr Catherine Carver
over 6 years ago
Www.bmj
0
14

Fake medicines are undermining global efforts to combat infectious disease, says US journal

Counterfeit and poor quality medicines threaten to undermine decades of progress in global health, particularly in the areas of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria, say papers published on 20 April in a special supplement of the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.1  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
0
18

Fake medicines are undermining global efforts to combat infectious disease, says US journal

Counterfeit and poor quality medicines threaten to undermine decades of progress in global health, particularly in the areas of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria, say papers published on 20 April in a special supplement of the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.1  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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Bacteremia and Intravascular Infections with Dr. Ramirez

Dr. Ramirez is a Professor of Medicine at the University of Louisville and is the Division Chief for Infectious Disease. Here, he discusses bacteremia and in...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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Selecting the right tool for the job: The ethical conundrum surrounding drug trials during deadly, rapidly spreading infectious disease

Randomized clinical trials of new drugs have long been considered the 'gold standard' in determining safety and efficacy before drugs, biologics, vaccines or devices are introduced to the...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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Just hit 'print': Office inkjet printer could produce simple tool to identify infectious diseases

Consumers are one step closer to benefiting from packaging that could give simple text warnings when food is contaminated with deadly pathogens like E.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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2

Public health at Anzac Cove: Challenges and lessons

Communicable diseases, particularly gastrointestinal ailments, took an enormous toll on Australian and New Zealand troops at Gallipoli in 1915, according to an article published in the Anzac...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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IDSA: National action plan for combating antibiotic resistant bacteria (carb) - a welcome effort in tackling resistance public health crisis

The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) welcomes the release of the...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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Zoonotic diseases and global viral pandemics

Emergence of new microbesWhile many endemic infectious diseases of humans have been largely contained, new microbes continue to emerge to threaten human and animal...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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New class of insecticides offers safer, more targeted mosquito control

Purdue researchers have identified a new class of chemical insecticides that could provide a safer, more selective means of controlling mosquitoes that transmit key infectious diseases such as...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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Diagnosing infectious diseases at the point-of-care

A new 'lab-on-a-disc' technology developed by an EU project research team can diagnose malaria and other febrile infectious diseases simultaneously in just an hour - allowing faster...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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Cattle parasite study suggests new ways to combat infectious diseases

Herds of African cattle could hold the secret to fighting parasitic diseases - such as malaria - in people, research suggests.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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International Journal of Infectious Diseases marks World TB Day 2015 with publication of special issue

To mark World TB Day, March 24, 2015, the International Journal of Infectious Diseases is publishing a Special Issue that will help raise awareness about the burden of tuberculosis and...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago