New to Meducation?
Sign up
Already signed up? Log In

Category

0
1
22

IF YOU ARE AN EXPAT, AND ENGLISH IS NOT YOUR FIRST LANGUAGE , HAVE YOU HAD TROUBLE WITH IDIOMS?

TROUBLE WITH IDIOMS. After finishing medical school in Louvain Belgium, I came to Schenectady, NY in the US to do my internship. My knowledge of English was what I knew from my high school language classes. this translates into “very little practical knowledge”. At first I struggled but caught on fast (I had to). What did not come so fast was my understanding of the use of idioms. In earlier blogs I related my embarrassment with “pain in the neck” and “prick”. Here is an other one which at the time gave me a red face but now after so many years makes me chuckle. Anne and I lived in a small apartment close to the hospital and got by on a small, very small, salary (this was the late fifties). So did all the other interns. Therefore our entertainment consisted of pot-luck weekend evenings at each other’s apartments on a rotating basis. When it was our turn to host the get together we had told our friends to come around 8:00 pm. In Belgium this means arrival at the earliest around 8:15 or even later. Of course this is quite different in the punctual American culture. That evening the bell rang at 8:01 with the arrival of the first guests. I opened the door, sat them down, started the background music and offered them a drink, as other guests arrived. While they all were sipping their wine, whiskey, or soft drink, someone asked where Anne was. She was still getting ready, not expecting any one until sometime after 8 pm. I told them “Anne is taking a douche.” Now, a douche is actually the French word for shower and is also commonly used in the Dutch language, but of course in the English language that word has quite a different meaning. When I told everyone quite innocently, that Anne was taking a douche, people’s mouths fell open and I could see on their faces the disbelief and hidden thoughts …”what kind of party is this going to be?” A similar confusion occurred toward the end of our stay in Schenectady, when the student nurses, many of whom had befriended Anne, who was now in her first pregnancy, told me that they were planning to give her a baby shower. They asked me not to say anything and keep it as a surprise. However, I felt compelled to warn Anne that she was going to receive a gift of a shower for the baby, rather than a bath. I felt that I needed to prepare her for this unusual gift, as I knew that babies in Belgium are washed in a small bath and not in a shower. Of course we had a good laugh when we realized our misunderstanding. And so it goes!! If you want to read more and similar experiences you can read my book “Crosscultural Doctoring. On and Off the Beaten Path. You can download it for free from Smashwords at: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/161522. Our just google: Crosscultural Doctoring. I would love to hear about similar experiences from people, medical or non medical, around the world who have had difficulty with english idioms.  
DR William LeMaire
about 4 years ago
Preview
0
2

Delirium and agitation at the end of life

Consider low dose haloperidol first line in people with delirium who are distressed or considered a risk to themselves or others, and in whom conservative management is ineffective or inappropriate  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
3

Delirium and agitation at the end of life

Consider low dose haloperidol first line in people with delirium who are distressed or considered a risk to themselves or others, and in whom conservative management is ineffective or inappropriate  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
1

Delirium and agitation at the end of life

Consider low dose haloperidol first line in people with delirium who are distressed or considered a risk to themselves or others, and in whom conservative management is ineffective or inappropriate  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
3

Delirium and agitation at the end of life

Consider low dose haloperidol first line in people with delirium who are distressed or considered a risk to themselves or others, and in whom conservative management is ineffective or inappropriate  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
1

Delirium and agitation at the end of life

Consider low dose haloperidol first line in people with delirium who are distressed or considered a risk to themselves or others, and in whom conservative management is ineffective or inappropriate  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
2

Delirium and agitation at the end of life

Consider low dose haloperidol first line in people with delirium who are distressed or considered a risk to themselves or others, and in whom conservative management is ineffective or inappropriate  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
2

Delirium and agitation at the end of life

Consider low dose haloperidol first line in people with delirium who are distressed or considered a risk to themselves or others, and in whom conservative management is ineffective or inappropriate  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
4

Delirium and agitation at the end of life

Consider low dose haloperidol first line in people with delirium who are distressed or considered a risk to themselves or others, and in whom conservative management is ineffective or inappropriate  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
1

New Delirium Test May Be Simpler, More Accurate

The Stanford Proxy Test for Delirium could potentially provide a more accurate assessment of patient symptoms and enhance recognition and treatment of delirium.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
6
0
2

Lab Case 104

A 70 year old female is brought to your ED with a 2 day history of worsening confusion. She is usually independent and lives in her own home. There is a history of colon cancer, hypertension and high cholesterol.  
emergucate.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
1

Mimics and Chameleons of Optic Neuritis

Optic neuritis is quite common, but often overdiagnosed--frequently due to confusion in terminology. What red flags should prompt reconsideration of a diagnosis?  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
1

Antipsychotics for Prevention and Treatment of Delirium

Antipsychotic pharmacotherapy is often used to prevent or treat delirium in hospitalized adults, but does evidence support its effectiveness?  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
1

From Brintellix to Trintellix: Drug's Name Changes for Safety

The FDA has approved a brand name change for the antidepressant Brintellix to decrease the risk of prescribing and dispensing errors due to name confusion with an antiplatelet agent.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
2

A man with altered mental status and metabolic acidosis

A 52 year old man was brought to the emergency department for acute onset shortness of breath and confusion. On physical examination he was agitated and taking deep breaths at the rate of 28/min. Initial venous blood gas on ambient air showed pH 7.02, partial pressure of carbon dioxide 3.4 kPa, partial pressure of oxygen 4.1 kPa. …  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
4

A man with altered mental status and metabolic acidosis

A 52 year old man was brought to the emergency department for acute onset shortness of breath and confusion. On physical examination he was agitated and taking deep breaths at the rate of 28/min. Initial venous blood gas on ambient air showed pH 7.02, partial pressure of carbon dioxide 3.4 kPa, partial pressure of oxygen 4.1 kPa. …  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
7

Fever with seizure and confusion

A 41 year old previously healthy man presented with a six day history of fever, headache, and vomiting, followed by two episodes of staring spells and unresponsiveness and secondarily generalised tonic-clonic seizures. In the emergency department he was restless, inattentive, and not oriented to time, place, and person (Glasgow coma score 10/15; best eye opening response (E): 3; best motor response (M): 5 and best verbal response (V):2). He had neck stiffness; Kernig’s sign was positive and his ocular fundi were normal. He had no limb weakness or ataxia and deep tendon reflexes and plantar reflexes were normal. He tested negative for HIV1/2 antigen and antibody. His blood coagulation profile and platelet count were normal. An initial unenhanced computed tomogram of the brain found no contraindications for lumbar puncture. Analysis of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) showed glucose 3.4 mmol/L (reference range 2.2-3.9 mmol/L; corresponding blood glucose was 5.8 mmol/L), protein 2.59 g/L (0.15-0.45 g/L), 450×106 white blood cells/L (100% lymphocytes; 0-5×106), and 40×106 red blood cells/L. Gram staining of the CSF was negative and bacterial culture was sterile. A confirmatory microbiological test was performed on his CSF and computed tomography of the brain repeated the second week after the onset of symptoms (fig 1⇓).  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
12

Fever with seizure and confusion

A 41 year old previously healthy man presented with a six day history of fever, headache, and vomiting, followed by two episodes of staring spells and unresponsiveness and secondarily generalised tonic-clonic seizures. In the emergency department he was restless, inattentive, and not oriented to time, place, and person (Glasgow coma score 10/15; best eye opening response (E): 3; best motor response (M): 5 and best verbal response (V):2). He had neck stiffness; Kernig’s sign was positive and his ocular fundi were normal. He had no limb weakness or ataxia and deep tendon reflexes and plantar reflexes were normal. He tested negative for HIV1/2 antigen and antibody. His blood coagulation profile and platelet count were normal. An initial unenhanced computed tomogram of the brain found no contraindications for lumbar puncture. Analysis of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) showed glucose 3.4 mmol/L (reference range 2.2-3.9 mmol/L; corresponding blood glucose was 5.8 mmol/L), protein 2.59 g/L (0.15-0.45 g/L), 450×106 white blood cells/L (100% lymphocytes; 0-5×106), and 40×106 red blood cells/L. Gram staining of the CSF was negative and bacterial culture was sterile. A confirmatory microbiological test was performed on his CSF and computed tomography of the brain repeated the second week after the onset of symptoms (fig 1⇓).  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

Association of COPD With Increased Confusion or Memory Loss

Does COPD impact confusion and memory loss? What are the functional consequences for people living with COPD?  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

Errors, Confusion Common in Notes Field in e-Prescriptions

The potential for errors leading to patient harm indicates a need for additional e-prescribing message fields, more adequate training, and better surveillance systems.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago