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Contraception

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ACOG Strengthens Opinion on IUDs and Implants

ACOG strengthened its support for long-acting reversible contraception, along with education, to reduce unintended pregnancy.  
medscape.com
almost 5 years ago
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Pregnant teenagers 'need more contraception support' - BBC News

Nearly one in four teenagers having an abortion in England and Wales has been pregnant at least once before, a study in the Journal of Adolescent Health has found.  
bbc.co.uk
almost 5 years ago
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Will OTC Contraceptives Change Patient-Provider Relationships?

Oral contraceptives without a prescription may increase access to birth control; they might also remove a woman's incentive to make an appointment.  
medscape.com
almost 5 years ago
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FAMILY PLANNING. A DILEMMA FOR THE CATHOLIC PRACTITIONER.

While in school, training, or practice, medical doctors, nurses, nurse practitioners, physician assistants or any health care worker for that matter, will be dealing with issues of family planning almost on a daily basis. They may also encounter these issues in their personal lives. While most religions allow artificial methods of family planning, the Roman Catholic Church has been steadfast in opposing any form of such artificial methods. The only method allowed is the so called "fertility awareness" method. This is based on the premise that avoidance of sexual intercourse during the fertile time of a woman's menstrual cycle will avoid pregnancy. Medical advances have certainly made the fertility awareness method more accurate, but determining this fertile time of the cycle still requires some effort and dedication by the woman and her partner. Nevertheless these natural methods work well and with a great deal of effectiveness when applied by such dedicated and educated couples and when the woman has relatively regular menstrual cycles. However, in less than these ideal circumstances, like in developing countries or refugee camps, where people often live in squalor and poverty, lack food and basic necessities, have no or little medical care, and where women do not have regular menstrual cycles, these natural methods have a high failure rate. A high failure rate results in unwanted pregnancies which add to the family's burden and are a factor in increasing even further their poverty status. Thus creating a vicious cycle. Under the conditions just described, families need highly effective contraceptives measures. On his return from a visit to the Philippines Pope Francis recently advocated catholics to limit the size of their families to a manageable number. This is great and welcome advice but in the same interview he reaffirmed the church's opposition to any artificial means of contraception. This seems rather unfair to me. On the one hand he tell catholics to limit their family size and on the other hand he denies them the effective methods of doing so. Ever since Francis became Pope he has indicated that he is willing to listen to the pressing needs facing, not only catholics but all people and possibly consider bringing the teaching of the Church into the twenty first century. There are certainly a number of indications that changes may be in the offing. First he has organized a Synod of the hierarchy of the Church in Rome last year to discuss all matters related to the family. When that Synod of "fizzled" out he has call for a follow up Synod later this year. He has made a number powerful statements and overtures towards homosexuals and divorced people and has strongly supported a strive for women's equality. He has even made some overtures to women who have had an abortion. Why not also open up the issue of contraception, so sorely needed in the world as I argued above? If the catholic church were to allow artificial methods of family planning, catholic medical practitioners and in fact all catholics, would no longer face the dilemma in their daily activities: adhere to the teaching of the church and deny their clients the effective means of limiting the size of their families and in doing so risk an unwanted pregnancy; or ignore the teaching and continue to use, prescribe, advice, insert, inject, operate to provide their clients with the effective contraception they want and need, but thereby feel marginalized by the church they love. There is already much evidence that a majority of catholics in the world follow this latter path. We can only hope that the Pope will listen to the experiences of couples from all walks of life and that he will solicit the input of catholic medical providers. May be, just may be, common sense and desperate needs will prevail, but do not hold your breath. Submitted by: William J. LeMaire MD Emeritus professor of Obstetric and Gynecology University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Miami, Florida USA 33155  
DR William LeMaire
almost 5 years ago
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The risk of heart attack and stroke in women using birth control pills | Cochrane

Since their introduction, combined oral contraceptive pills have become one of the most popular birth control methods. These pills contain two types of female hormones, estrogen and progestagen. When used correctly, the failure rate (i.e. the occurrence of unwanted pregnancy) is less than one per 100 women per year. Despite their reliability, oral contraceptive pills have been found to increase the risk of a blood clot forming in an artery, i.e. arterial thrombosis (heart attack or stroke). As arterial thrombosis is rare in young women, and as many types of oral contraceptive pills exist, the size of the risk is unclear. Furthermore, the effect of different types of progestagens or different doses of estrogen on the risk of arterial thrombosis is unknown.  
cochrane.org
almost 5 years ago
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Hoope STD Testing Ring to Let You Check Partner Before Shagging |

The birth control pill liberated sexuality in the western world, while sexually transmitted diseases rolled it back considerably. A new device, in the form  
medgadget.com
almost 5 years ago
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Hormonal and intrauterine methods for birth control in women age 25 years or younger | Cochrane

Women aged 25 years and younger are more likely to stop using birth control than women over 25 years of age. They are also more likely to get pregnant while using birth control compared with older women. We do not know which birth control methods have the lowest pregnancy rates and the highest continued use in young women.  
cochrane.org
almost 5 years ago
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Methods to reduce pain with insertion of intrauterine contraception | Cochrane

Fear of pain with insertion of intrauterine contraception (IUC) may cause women to avoid using this very effective method of birth control. IUC includes devices with copper and with the hormone levonorgestrel. Researchers have studied many ways of reducing pain with IUC insertion. These include drugs that lessen uterine cramps, soften and open the cervix (uterus opening), or numb the cervix.  
cochrane.org
almost 5 years ago
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Education about family planning for women who have just given birth | Cochrane

Counseling about family planning is standard for most women who just gave birth. Few providers and researchers have looked at how well the counseling works. We do not know if postpartum women want to use family planning or whether they will return to a health provider for birth control advice. Women may wish to discuss family planning before they have the baby and after they leave the hospital. Women may also prefer to talk about birth control along with other health issues. In this review, we looked at the effects of educational programs about family planning for women who just had a baby.  
cochrane.org
almost 5 years ago
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Hormonal birth control and fracture risk in observational studies | Cochrane

When bone mass declines with age, the risk of fractures increases. Birth control methods that have hormones may lead to changes in women’s bone density. Worry about fractures may limit the use of these effective methods. Observational studies can collect data on birth control use as well as fractures later in life. Through June 2015, we searched for such studies in several databases.   
cochrane.org
almost 5 years ago
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Oviary, an Electronic Solution to Make Sure You Don't Forget The Birth Control Pill |

Women on "the pill" know all too well that skipping a day's dose may lead to an unwanted pregnancy, yet many still end up forgetting or put it off to the n  
medgadget.com
almost 5 years ago
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Interventions delivered by mobile phone to support client use of family planning/contraception | Cochrane

Contraception - methods or devices used to prevent pregnancy – has significant benefits for women's and children's health. Despite these benefits, an estimated 225 million women in developing countries were not using a modern contraceptive method in 2014 despite wanting to avoid pregnancy. Expansion of mobile phone use in recent years has led to increased interest in healthcare delivery via mobile phone and the potential to deliver support wherever the person is located, whenever it is needed, and to reach populations with restricted access to services. Mobile phone-based interventions have been demonstrated to be effective in other health areas, but not yet in the field of contraception.  
cochrane.org
about 5 years ago
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Intrauterine contraception soon after childbirth | Cochrane

Women have two main choices for intrauterine contraception (IUC): one that releases the hormone levonorgestrel, and one without hormones that contains copper. Beginning IUC use right after childbirth and before hospital discharge can be good for many reasons. The woman knows she is not pregnant, and the time and place are convenient for starting a method that works well. We looked at whether IUC would be more likely to come out on its own if put in right after birth of a baby. For women who wanted IUC but did not have it placed right away, we studied whether they returned later for insertion.  
cochrane.org
about 5 years ago
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Core Clinical Cases in Obstetrics and Gynaecology Third Edition

You've read your textbook and your course notes. Now you need to apply your knowledge to real life clinical situations. The problem-solving approach of Core Clinical Cases guides you to think of the patient as a whole, rather than as a sequence of unconnected symptoms. With its emphasis on everyday practice strongly linked to underlying theory, the series integrates your knowledge with the realities of managing clinical problems, and provides a basis for developing sound analytical and confident decision-making skills. The core areas of undergraduate study are covered in a logical sequence of learning activities; the same questions are asked of each clinical case, followed by detailed explanatory answers. OSCE counselling cases, with related questions and answers, also feature in each section. Key concepts and important information are highlighted, and the reader-friendly layout reflects exactly the type of question you will encounter, making these volumes the perfect revision aid for all types of case-based examination. The Obstetrics and Gynaecology volume, fully revised and updated in this third edition, focuses on the following topics: * Early pregnancy problems * Pregnancy dating and fetal growth * Late pregnancy problems * Labour * Medical disorders of pregnancy * Puerperium * Abnormal uterine bleeding * Amenorrhoea and menopause * Incontinence and prolapse * Neoplasia * Discharge and pain* Infertility * Fertility control Volumes in the Core Clinical Cases series remain absolutely invaluable in the run up to clinical, written or OSCE examinations, and ideal course companions for all undergraduate medical students at various stages in their clinical training.  
books.google.co.uk
about 5 years ago
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Core Clinical Cases in Obstetrics and Gynaecology Third Edition

You've read your textbook and your course notes. Now you need to apply your knowledge to real life clinical situations. The problem-solving approach of Core Clinical Cases guides you to think of the patient as a whole, rather than as a sequence of unconnected symptoms. With its emphasis on everyday practice strongly linked to underlying theory, the series integrates your knowledge with the realities of managing clinical problems, and provides a basis for developing sound analytical and confident decision-making skills. The core areas of undergraduate study are covered in a logical sequence of learning activities; the same questions are asked of each clinical case, followed by detailed explanatory answers. OSCE counselling cases, with related questions and answers, also feature in each section. Key concepts and important information are highlighted, and the reader-friendly layout reflects exactly the type of question you will encounter, making these volumes the perfect revision aid for all types of case-based examination. The Obstetrics and Gynaecology volume, fully revised and updated in this third edition, focuses on the following topics: * Early pregnancy problems * Pregnancy dating and fetal growth * Late pregnancy problems * Labour * Medical disorders of pregnancy * Puerperium * Abnormal uterine bleeding * Amenorrhoea and menopause * Incontinence and prolapse * Neoplasia * Discharge and pain* Infertility * Fertility control Volumes in the Core Clinical Cases series remain absolutely invaluable in the run up to clinical, written or OSCE examinations, and ideal course companions for all undergraduate medical students at various stages in their clinical training.  
books.google.co.uk
about 5 years ago
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Bedside Obstetrics & Gynecology

The second edition of Bedside Obstetrics & Gynecology brings postgraduate trainees fully up to date with the most recent advances in the field. The first section covers obstetrics, discussing normal and abnormal presentations (such as normal labour versus breech presentation), complications in pregnancy (including early pregnancy bleeding and ante- and postpartum haemorrhage), and medical disorders related to pregnancy (such as preeclampsia and gestational diabetes). Section two covers numerous gynaecological abnormalities. This new edition has been fully revised but continues to emphasise the importance of history taking and clinical examination. New chapters have been added to cover topics such as preterm pregnancy, post-dated pregnancy and intrauterine death, bleeding due to miscarriage, menopause and contraception. Nearly 1100 images, illustrations and tables enhance learning, and each chapter includes questions and answers related to case studies. Key points Fully revised, new edition providing recent advances in obstetrics and gynaecology Many new chapters added Includes 1100 images, illustrations and tables Previous edition published in 2010  
books.google.co.uk
about 5 years ago
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contraception-emergency

This CKS topic is based mainly on guidance produced by the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare (FSRH), formerly the Faculty of Family Planning and Reproductive Healthcare (FFPRHC) [FSRH, 2011c] and covers the management of women requesting emergency contraception in primary care.  
cks.nice.org.uk
about 5 years ago
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SGEM#22: Papa Don’t Preach (Emergency Contraception)

Case Scenario: 21yo presents to the ED at 8am very distraught. She reports the condom broke last night during intercourse and requests the morning after pill.  
thesgem.com
about 5 years ago
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JFPRHC podcast: A transatlantic view of oral contraception

Stream JFPRHC podcast: A transatlantic view of oral contraception by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
feeds.bmj.com
about 5 years ago
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Rise in IUD and contraceptive implant use among US teens

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that use of long-acting reversible contraception by teens in the US increased by fifteen times from 2005-13.  
medicalnewstoday.com
about 5 years ago