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CranialNerves

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Cranial Nerves

A table listing the cranial nerves, their fibre type, attachment, cranial exit, function and method of testing  
Dahlia Abdul-Rahman
over 6 years ago
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Cranial Nerves in one minute!

Dr Rob reviews the 12 cranial nerves in 60 seconds.  
youtube.com
almost 4 years ago
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Detailed first and second year OSCE stations

Explanations of procedures and signs associated with various OSCE style stations relevant to first and second year MBBS, including pictures of relevant pathology and illustrative diagrams. Includes - resuscitatio - peripheral pulse - blood pressur - cardiovascular exam (including relevant aspects of the general examination - ECG lead placemen - Respiratory exam (including relevant aspects of the general examination - peak flo - vitalograp - abdominal examination (including relevant aspects of the general examination - PNS (motor function - Reflexes alon - cranial nerve exa - Thyroid exa - cervical and lymph node (diagrams only - Shoulder joint exa - Hip joint exam  
Gemma McIntosh
over 8 years ago
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Cranial Nerves OSCE Examination

Learn how to examine the cranial nerves with key facts and landmarks explained and highlighted.  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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Continuation of Cranial Nerve Exam

Continuing on a previous presentation for cranial nerve exams by the clinical skills tutors at the University of Liverpool  
Mary
almost 7 years ago
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Cranial Nerve Examination - OSCE Guide

The ability to carry out a thorough and slick cranial nerve examination is something every medic needs to master. This video aims to give you an idea of what's required in the OSCE and you can then customise the examination to suit your own personal style. We spend a lot of time and effort both filming and editing these videos, so we hope you find them useful! This video is part of a series of OSCE video guides which can be found at www.geekymedics.com or alternatively at http://www.youtube.com/user/geekymedics123 Remember that what these exams involve and how they are carried out differs between medical schools, so always follow your local guidance.  
Lewis Potter
about 7 years ago
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Overview of Cranial Nerve Examinations

Guide for beginning a cranial exam by the clinical skills tutors at the University of Liverpool  
Mary
almost 7 years ago
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Quick Neurological Screening Examination

A demonstration of a CNS screening examination.  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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Vagus nerve

An edited version of my Friday Evening Discouse given to the Royal Institution on 11 April 2008. Abstract: The vagus nerves (cranial nerve X) connects our brainstem to the body, facilitating monitoring and control of many automatic functions; the vagus electrically links our gut, lungs and heart to the base of the brain in an evolutionarily-ancient circuit, similar between mammals and also seen in birds, reptiles, and amphibians. The vagus comprises a major part of the parasympathetic autonomic nervous system, contributing to the motor control of important physiological functions such as heart rate and gut motility. The vagus is also sensory, relaying protective visceral information leading to reflexes like cough and indication of lung volume. The vagus has been described as a neural component of the immune reflex. By monitoring changes in the level of control exerted by the vagus, apparent as beat by beat changes of heart rate, it is possible to indirectly view the effect of pharmaceuticals and disease on brainstem function and neural processes underlying consciousness. The paired vagus nerves of humans have different functions, and stimulation of the left vagus has been shown to be a therapeutic treatment for epilepsy, and may modulate the perception of pain.  
Chris Pomfrett
over 10 years ago
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640

Learn 12 Cranial Nerves in 5mins (The Easy Way)

If you want the PDF of the 12 Cranial Nerves --- it can be purchased here https://www.scribd.com/doc/244032967/12-Cranial-Nerves I reduced the length of my o...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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Facial Nerve Anatomy

The facial nerve is the seventh cranial nerve, or simply cranial nerve VII.  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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Cranial Nerves Examination

This video tutorial teaches a comprehensive approach to cranial nerves examination. It is part of the MedPrep video tutorial series: http://www.medprep.in/clinical-examination-videos.php On YouTube, the MedPrep video tutorial series has received nearly 24,000 hits. The video series features myself, Sohaib Rufai, third year medical student at the University of Southampton, along with Iftkhar Hussein, an Economics student at the University of Manchester playing the patient, and Fahad Khan, a Clinical Sciences student at the University of Bradford, filming. The videos were then edited by myself. The aim was to produce a useful video series that is easy to follow, at times adding a bit of humour. The patient also put in extra time at the gym especially for the videos. The MedPrep website has been developed by a group of us at University of Southampton, aiming to provide free useful learning aids for medical students.  
Soton
about 7 years ago
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Cranial Nerve Examination - OSCE Guide

The ability to carry out a thorough and slick cranial nerve examination is something every medic needs to master. This video aims to give you an idea of what's required in the OSCE and you can then customise the examination to suit your own personal style. Make sure to head over to http://geekymedics.com/osce/cranial-nerve-exam/ to see the written guide alongside the video. Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/geekymedics Follow us on twitter at http://www.twitter.com/geekymedics Contact us at geekymedics@gmail.com with any questions or feedback. Always refer to your local medical school / hospital guidance before applying any of the steps demonstrated in this video guide.  
OSCE Videos
over 5 years ago
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763

Cranial Nerves

All you need to know about Cranial Nerves in one spreadsheet  
Kelsey Lennox
almost 5 years ago
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The Cranial Nerves Song

The Cranial Nerve Song for Med Students and anyone learning the topic! The lyrics give the functions of each cranial nerve, and also the foramen of exit and ...  
YouTube
about 5 years ago
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List of medical mnemonics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There are many mnemonics for the names of the cranial nerves, e.g. "OOOTTAFAGVSH" is "OLd OPen OCeans TROuble TRIbesmen ABout Fish VEnom Giving VArious ACute/SPlitting Headaches" (a mnemonic that gives enough letters to distinguish between nerves that start with the same letter), or "On old Olympus's towering tops, a Finn and German viewed some hops,"[11] and for the initial letters "OOOTTAFVGVAH" is "Oh, oh, oh, to touch and feel veronica's gooey v*g**a ... ah, heaven."[12] The differences between these depend on "acoustic" versus "vestibulocochlear" and "spinal-accessory" versus "accessory".  
en.wikipedia.org
about 4 years ago
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Neuroanatomy - Cranial Nerves

Anatomy of Cranial Nerves http://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan  
Nicole Chalmers
over 5 years ago
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Cranial Nerve 4 Palsy

This excerpt comes from a neuro-ophthalmology lecture from Ophthobook.com. Fourth nerve palsies effect the superior oblique muscle (trochlea).  
Nicole Chalmers
over 5 years ago
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My transition from medical student to patient

I started medical school in 2007 wanting to 'making people better'. I stopped medical school in 2010 facing the reality of not being able to get better myself, being ill and later to be diagnosed with several long term health conditions. This post is about my transition from being a medical student, to the other side - being a patient. There are many things I wish I knew about long-term health conditions and patients when I was a medical student. I hope that through this post, current medical students can become aware of some of theses things and put them into practice as doctors themselves. I went to medical school because I wanted to help people and make them better. I admired doctors up on their pedestals for their knowledge and skills and expertise to 'fix things'. The hardest thing for me was accepting that doctors can't always make people better - they couldn't make me better. Holding doctors so highly meant it was very difficult for me to accept their limitations when it came to incurable long-term conditions and then to accept that as a patient I had capacity myself to help my conditions and situation. Having studied medicine at a very academic university, I had a very strict perception of knowledge. Knowledge was hard and fast medical facts that were taught in a formal setting. I worked all day and night learning the anatomical names for all the muscles in the eye, the cranial nerves and citric acid cycle, not to mention the pharmacology in second year. Being immersed in that academic scientific environment, I correlated expertise with PhDs and papers. It was a real challenge to realise that knowledge doesn't always have to be acquired through a formal educational but that it can be acquired through experience. Importantly, knowledge acquired through experience is equally valid! This means the knowledge my clinicians have developed through studying and working is as valid as my knowledge of my conditions, symptoms and triggers, developed through experiencing it day in day out. I used to feel cross about 'expert patients' - I have spent all these hours in a library learning the biochemistry and pharmacology and 'Joe Bloggs' walks in and knows it all! That wasn't the right attitude, and wasn't fair on patients. As an expert patient myself now, I have come to understood that we are experts through different means, and in different fields. My clinicians remain experts in the biological aspects on disease, but that's not the full picture. I am an expert in the psychological and social impact of my conditions. All aspects need to be taken into account if I am going to have holistic integrated care - the biopsychosocial model in practice - and that's where shared-decision making comes in. The other concept which is has been shattered since making the transition from medical student to patient is that of routine. In my first rotation, orthopaedics and rheumatology, I lost track within the first week of how many outpatient appointments I sat in on. I didn't really think anything of them - they are just another 15 minute slot of time filled with learning in a very busy day. As a patient, my perspective couldn't be more different. I have one appointment with my consultant a year, and spend weeks planning and preparing, then a month recovering emotionally. Earlier this year I wrote a whole post just about this - The Anatomy of an Appointment. Appointments are routine for you - they are not for us! The concept of routine applies to symptoms too. After my first relapse, I had an emergency appointment with my consultant, and presented with very blurred vision and almost total loss of movement in my hands. That very fact I had requested an urgent appointment suggest how worried I was. My consultants response in the appointment was "there is nothing alarming about your symptoms". I fully appreciate that my symptoms may not have meant I was going to drop dead there and then, and that in comparison to his patients in ICU, I was not as serious. But loosing vision and all use of ones hands at the age of 23 (or any age for that matter) is alarming in my books! I guess he was trying to reassure me, but it didn't come across like that! I have a Chiari malformation (in addition to Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome and Elhers-Danlos Syndrome) and have been referred to a neurosurgeon to discuss the possibility of neurosurgery. It is stating the obvious to say that for a neurosurgeon, brain surgery is routine - it's their job! For me, the prospect of even being referred to a neurosurgeon was terrifying, before I even got to the stage of discussing the operation. It is not a routine experience at all! At the moment, surgery is not needed (phew!) but the initial experience of this contact with neurosurgeons illustrates the concept of routines and how much our perspectives differ. As someone with three quite rare and complex conditions, I am invariable met in A&E with comments like "you are so interesting!". I remember sitting in the hospital cafeteria at lunch as a student and literally feasting on the 'fascinating' cases we had seen on upstairs on the wards that morning. "oh you must go and see that really interesting patient with X, Y and Z!" I am so thankful that you all find medicine so interesting - you need that passion and fascination to help you with the ongoing learning and drive to be a doctor. I found it fascinating too! But I no longer find neurology that interesting - it is too close to home. Nothing is "interesting" if you live with it day in day out. No matter what funky things my autonomic nervous may be doing, there is nothing interesting or fascinating about temporary paralysis, headaches and the day to day grind of my symptoms. This post was inspired by NHS Change Day (13th March 2013) - as a patient, I wanted to share these few things with medical students, what I wish I knew when I was where you are now, to help the next generation of doctors become the very best doctors they can. I wish you all the very best for the rest of your studies, and thank you very much for reading! Anya de Iongh www.thepatientpatient2011.blogspot.co.uk @anyadei  
Anya de Iongh
over 6 years ago
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Cranial nerve nuclei in brainstem (schema)

One of my professors made this schema long time ago. I drew it again to add some colour. It helped me a lot to memorize everything. :)  
Sigyn
about 4 years ago