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23
929

Thyroid Hormone Synthesis

Thyroid hormone synthesis is a complex process involving both intracellular and extracellular components. This 7 min, 43 s video utilizes custom-designed ani...  
youtube.com
almost 2 years ago
B7529db325b26dad1d7cbf7b580a6d45
13
961

How to Write a Resume: Tips for Medical Students

It is understandable why resume writing is daunting for most students – they haven’t achieved many significant things at such young age and they have difficulties to present usual things as something extraordinary. However, you shouldn’t give up on your efforts, because you will be surprised by all things your potential employers consider valuable. All you have to do is find the right way to demonstrate your achievements and relate them to the job you are applying for. The following tips will help you write a great resume that will represent you as an ideal candidate for every employer. 1. Start the process by listing your experiences. You cannot tackle the challenge right where it gets most difficult, so you should gradually work your way towards the precise professional language. Start with brainstorming and create a list of all experiences you consider significant. You can draw experiences from all life aspects, such as school, academic activities, internships, prior employments, community service, sports, and whatever else you consider important. Look at that list and distinguish the most motivating experiences that led you to the point where you currently are. 2. Target the resume towards the job. Sending the same generic resume to all potential employers is a common mistake students do. You should tailor a custom-written resume for each job application, representing experiences and skills that will be relevant for the position you’re applying for. 3. Present yourself as a dynamic person. Find the most active components of your experiences and present them in the resume. Focus on action verbs, because they are attention-grabbing and make powerful statements (trained, evaluated, taught, researched, organized, led, oriented, calculated, interviewed, wrote, and so on). 4. Mark the most notable elements of your experiences and use them to start your descriptions. An employer couldn’t care less about the mundane aspects of college or internships, so feel free to leave them out and highlight your persona as a professional who would be a great choice for an employee. 5. Show what you can do for the organization. Employers are only looking for candidates who can contribute towards the growth of their companies, so make sure to portray yourself as someone who can accomplish great things in the role you are applying for. You can do this by reviewing your experiences and highlighting any success you achieved, no matter how small it is. 6. Don’t forget that your most important job at the moment is being a student. While you’re a student, that’s the most important aspect of your life and you should forget to mention that you are an engaged learner in your resume. Include the high GPA and the achievements in your major as important information in your resume. 7. Describe the most important academic projects. At this stage of life, you don’t have many professional experiences to brag about, but your academic projects can also be included in your resume because they show your collaborative, critical thinking, research, writing, and presentation skills. 8. Present yourself as a leader. If you were ever engaged as a leader in a project, make sure to include the information about recruiting and organizing your peers, as well as training, leading, and motivating them. 9. Include information about community service. If all students knew that employers appreciate community service as an activity that shows that the person has matured and cares for the society, they wouldn’t underestimate it so much. Make sure to include information about your activities as a volunteer – your potential employers will definitely appreciate it. 10. Review before you submit! Your resume will require some serious reviewing before you can send it safely to employers. This isn’t the place where you can allow spelling and grammatical errors to slip through. The best advice would be to hire a professional editor to bring this important document to perfection. One of the most important things to remember is that writing a great resume requires a lot of time and devotion. Make sure to follow the above-listed steps, and you will make the entire process less daunting.  
Robert Morris
over 3 years ago
3fc6792963ef4dd6c580391abb625885
6
101

A Review of My Psychiatry Rotation

This field of medicine requires much more physiological and pathophysiological knowledge than most people give it credit for. Psychiatric illness DO have physical manifestations of symptoms; in fact those symptoms help form the main criteria for differential diagnoses. For example, key physical symptoms of depression, besides having a low mood for more than two weeks (yes, two weeks is all it takes to be classified as 'depressed'), include fatigue, change in appetite, unexplained aches/pains, changes in menstrual cycle if you're a female, altered bowel habits, abnormal sleep, etc. Aside from this, studies suggest that psychiatric illnesses put you at higher risk for physical conditions including heart disease, osteoarthritis, etc. (the list really does go on) Although some mental health conditions, like cognitive impairments, still do not have very effective treatment options; most psychiatric medications work very well, and are necessary for treating the patient. The stigma surrounding them by the public causes a huge problem for doctors. Many patients are reluctant to comply with medications because they are not as widely accepted as the ones for non-mental health conditions. A psychiatrist holds a huge responsibility for patient education. It can be tough to teach your patients about their medication, when many of them refuse to belief there is anything wrong with them (this is also because of stigma). Contrary to my previous beliefs, psychiatrists DO NOT sit around talking about feelings all day. The stereotypical image of someone lying down on a couch talking about their thoughts/feelings while the doctor holds up ink blots, is done more in 'cognitive behavioural therapy.' While this is a vital healthcare service, it's not really what a psychiatrist does. Taking a psychiatric history is just like taking a regular, structured medical history; except you have to ask further questions about their personal history (their relationships, professional life, significant life events, etc), forensic history, substance misuse history (if applicable), and childhood/developmental history. Taking a psychiatric history for a new patient usually takes at least an hour. The interesting thing about about treating a psychiatric patient is that the best guidelines you have for making them healthy is their personality before the symptoms started (this is called 'pre-morbid personality'). This can be difficult to establish, and can often be an ambiguous goal for a doctor to reach. Of course, there is structure/protocol for each illness, but each patient will be unique. This is a challenge because personalities constantly evolve, healthy or not, and the human mind is perpetual. On top of this, whether mental or physical, a serious illness usually significally impacts a person's personality. Most psychiatric conditions, while being very treatable, will affect the patient will struggle with for their whole life. This leaves the psychiatrist with a large portion of the responsibility for the patient's quality of life and well-being; this can be vey rewarding and challenging. The state of a person's mind is a perpetual thing, choosing the right medication is not enough. Before I had done this rotation, I was quite sure that this was a field I was not interested in. I still don't know if it is something I would pursue, but I'm definitely more open-minded to it now! PS: It has also taught me some valuable life lessons; most of the patients I met were just ordinary people who were pushed a little too far by the unfortunate combination/sequence of circumstances in their life. Even the ones who have committed crimes or were capable of doing awful things.. It could happen to anyone, and just because I have been lucky enough to not experience the things those people have, does not mean I am a better person for not behaving the same way as them.  
Mary
over 3 years ago
Preview
3
217

Bacterial Etiologies of Common Infections (Antibiotics - Lecture 2)

A summary of the role and composition of normal flora, the typical bacterial pathogens causing several common infectious diseases, diagnosis of UTI, and interpretation as to whether a positive blood culture represents true infection or contamination. Bonus points to anyone who can identify the mystery portrait.  
Nicole Chalmers
over 3 years ago
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4
60

Anatomy of the human body

Film for medical anatomy of the human body Private medical students.  
YouTube
over 3 years ago
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2
23

Lever systems in the human body

After watching this video session, it is expected that you will be able to Define levers. Enumerate the main uses of levers Identify the three classes of lev...  
youtube.com
over 1 year ago
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5
90

What is the largest bone in the human body?

The largest and longest bone in the human body is the femur, and it is located in the upper leg. The femur connects to the knee at one end and fits into the hip socket at the...  
ask.com
over 1 year ago
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1
14

The culture of a trauma team in relation to human factors

J Clin Nurs. 2006 Oct;15(10):1257-66.  
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
over 3 years ago
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1
27

Natural and Traditional Medicine in Cuba: Lessons For U.S. M... : Academic Medicine

The Institute of Medicine's (IOM's) Academy of Science has recommended that medical schools incorpor  
journals.lww.com
over 3 years ago
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2
25

Blood Cultures - Full Process

Blood Cultures - Full Procedure The Blood Cultures procedure performed following official University Hospitals of Leicester (UHL) Guidelines Stage 1 - Consent 0:35 Stage 2 - Equipment 2:14 Stage 3 - Procedure 3:24 Stage 4 - After Care 9:59 http://leicesterclinicalskills.weebly.com  
Leicester Clinical Skills
over 3 years ago
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2
12

Sterilisation

Sterilisation Can be controversial in some cultures Should only be undertaken in stable relationships where the couple is certain they do not want any more children   Epidemiology Rates falling in developed countries UK is unusual as the number of men receiving the operation is greater than the number of women 18% of men between 18-69 have had a vasectomy  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 3 years ago
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0
4

The Tools of an Evidence-Based Culture: Implementing Clinica... : Academic Medicine

Purpose: Although clinical-practice guidelines (CPGs) are implemented on the assumption that they wi  
journals.lww.com
over 3 years ago
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0
4

Cultural Competence Springs up in the Desert: The Story of... : Academic Medicine

The authors describe the factors that led Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar (WCMC-Q) to establi  
journals.lww.com
over 3 years ago
4ab7d2c63f92c331a495acef5c5378b9
5
35

Why can't we have a NICE'er EU?

The book of the week this week has been Chris Patten’s “Not quite the diplomat” – part autobiography, half recent history and a third political philosophy text. It is a fascinating insight into the international community of the last 3 decades. The book has really challenged some of my political beliefs – which I thought were pretty unshakeable – and one above all others, the EU. I read this book to help me decide who I should vote for in the upcoming MEP elections. I have to make a confession, my political views are on the right of the centre and I have always been quite a strong “Eurosceptic”. Although recently, I have found myself drifting further and further into the camp of “we must pull out of Europe at all costs” but Mr Patten’s arguments and insights have definitely made me question this stance. With the European Parliamentary elections coming up, I thought it might be an interesting time to put some ideas out there for discussion. From a young age, I have always been of the opinion that Great Britain is a world leading country, a still great power, one of the best countries in the world - democratic, tolerant, fair, sensible - and that we don’t need anyone else’s “help” or interference in how our country is run. I believe that British voters should have a democratic input on the rules that govern them. To borrow an American phrase “No taxation without representation!” I believe that democracy is not perfect but that it is the best system of government that humans have been able to develop. For all of its faults, voters normally swing back to the centre ground eventually and any silly policies can be undone. This system has inherently more checks and balances than any meritocracy, oligarchy or bureaucracy (taking it literally to mean being ruled by unelected officials). This is one of my major objections to how the European Union currently works. For all intents and purposes, it is not democratic. Institutions of the EU include the European Commission, the Council of the European Union, the European Council, the Court of Justice of the European Union, the European Central Bank, the Court of Auditors, and the European Parliament. Only one of these institutions is elected by the European demos (the parliament) and that institution doesn’t really make any changes to any policies – “the rubber stamp brigade”. The European Council is made up of the President of the European Council (Unelected), President of the European commission (Unelected) and the heads of the member states (elected) and is where quite a lot of the "major" policies come from but not all of the read tape (the European Commission and Parliament). I am happy to be proved wrong but it just seems that the EU, as a whole, is made up of unelected officials who increasing try to make rules that apply to all 28 member states without any consent from the voters in those states – it looks like the rule of “b-euro-crats” (bureaucrats – this version has far too many vowels for a dyslexic person to use). A beurocratic rule which many of us do not agree with but seemingly have to succumb to, a good example for medics is the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) which means that junior doctors only get paid for working 48h a week when they may spend many, many more hours in work. The EWTD has also made training a lot more difficult for many junior doctors and has many implications for how the health service is now run. Is it right that this law was imposed on us without our consent? If we imposed a treatment on a patient without their consent then we would be in very big trouble indeed! I cannot deny that the EU has done some good in the world and I cannot deny that Britain has benefited from being a member. I just wish that we could pay to have access to the markets, while retaining control over the laws in our lands. I want us to be in Europe, as a partner but not as a vassal. In short, I would like us to stay within the EU but with major reforms. I know that any reforms I suggest will not be read by anyone in power and I know they are probably unrealistic but I thought I would put it out there just to see what people think. I would like to see a NICE’er European Union. The National Institute for Clinical Excellence is a Non Departmental Public Body (NDPB), part of the UK Department of Health but a separate organisation (http://www.nice.org.uk/aboutnice/whoweare/who_we_are.jsp). NICE’s role is to advise the UK health service and social services. It does this by assessing the available evidence for treatments/ therapies/ policies etc and then by producing guidelines outlining the evidence and the suggested best course of action. None of these guidelines are enforced by law, for example, as a doctor you do not have to follow the NICE recommendations but if you ignore them and your patient suffers as a consequence then you are likely to be in big trouble with the General Medical Council. So, here would be my recommendations for EU reform: First, we all pay pretty much the same as we do now for access to the European market. We continue with free movement and we keep the European Council but elect the President. This way all the member states can meet up and decide if they want to share any major policies. We all benefit from free movement and we all benefit from a larger free trade area. Second, we get rid of most of the rest of the EU institutions and replace them with an institute a bit like NICE. The European Institute for Policy Excellence (EIPE) would be (hopefully) quite a small department that looks at the best available evidence and then produces guidance on the policy. A shorter executive summary would hopefully also be available for everyday people to read and understand what the policy is about - just like how patients can read NICE executive summaries to understand their condition better. Then any member state could choose to adopt the policy if their parliaments think it worthwhile. This voluntary opt-in system would mean that states retain control of their laws, would probably adopt the policies voluntarily (eventually) and that the European citizens might actually grow to like the EU laws if they can be shown to be evidence based, in the public’s best interests, in the control of the public and not just a law/red tape imposed from above. The European Union should be a place where our elected officials go to debate and agree policies in the best interests of their electorates. There should therefore be an opt-out of any policy for any member state that does not think it will benefit from a policy. This looser union that I would like to see will probably not happen and I do worry that one day we will wake up in the undemocratic united federal states of Europe but this worry should not force us to make an irrational choice now. We should not be voting to "leave the EU at all costs" but we should be voting for reform and a better more co-operative international community. I would not dare suggest who any of you should vote for but I hope you use your vote for change and reform and not more of the same.  
jacob matthews
over 3 years ago
Bdbb48375117ab6d6f2db7cdde3c0819
5
1519

Gawande-ism

Good morning all, Being new to blogging, it's surprisingly interesting how difficult it is to start! I recently read Atul Gawande's three best selling books and they were an inspiration. I am sure most medic's will be aware of Mr Gawande (http://gawande.com/), the man behind the WHO safe surgery checklist. If you are not, and you want to read something that will really enthuse you about modern medicine, then please do get his books out from the library. I would recommend starting with "Better". The last chapter of "Better" is what prompted me to write this. Gawande has come up with 5 principles for being a "positive deviant" and 1 of them is - Just Write! He believes that to make our lives as doctors/medical students and the world a better place, we should all write down what we have been thinking about, because we may just come up with something that other people can use or just find others who have similar thoughts and will help us build a sense of community together. Although I have made many previous New Years resolutions to start keeping diaries and to keep journals of thoughts. They have always ended fairly quickly. This time may be different. Hopefully I will come up with some more thoughts that are vaguely worth sharing soon. Final thought for now - "Gawande-ism" = the belief that we can all make self-improvements and improve the world around us, little by little.  
jacob matthews
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
4

Why would a consultant think of going into management?

The NHS is keen to encourage more senior doctors to move into management, but few make the leap. Not only is there an “us and them” culture but the risks are far too high. Richard Vize reports  
bmj.com
over 2 years ago
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1
240

Custom Essay Writing Service. Cheap and Fast Essays of Best Quality

Are you looking for fast and cheap essay writing service? We are ready to assist you with the paper of any type and difficulty. 24/7 online customer support. Place your order right now!  
writingservice.essayhave.com
almost 3 years ago
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1
12

Exploring CQC’s well-led domain

The CQC’s inspections focus on five key lines of enquiry as part of its ‘well-led’ domain. This paper sets out what boards can do in these five areas and draws on examples of good practice in leadership and culture in health care. Following the Francis Report into the failures of care at Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust, and the government’s response to the report, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) has introduced a more rigorous and wide-ranging approach to inspecting health care providers. The main purpose of inspections is to assess the quality of care delivered to patients. In making this assessment, CQC now also analyses the leadership and organisational culture of providers.  
The King's Fund
over 2 years ago
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1
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Medical revalidation

Our qualitative assessment of the impact to date of medical revalidation on the behaviour of doctors and the culture of organisations within seven case study sites across England. Medical revalidation of doctors became a statutory obligation for all employing organisations in 2012, but its origins stretch back to 2000. In that period, the NHS has undergone many changes and been scrutinised by several reviews. It was against this shifting context that The King's Fund carried out a qualitative assessment of the impact to date of medical revalidation on the behaviour of doctors and the culture of organisations within seven case study sites across England.  
kingsfund.org.uk
over 3 years ago
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1
15

Developing collective leadership for health care

Our paper argues that collective leadership – as opposed to command-and-control structures – provides the optimum basis for caring cultures. With the NHS facing bigger challenges than ever before, leaders must ensure that cultures within health care organisations sustain high-quality, compassionate and ever-improving care. Key to shaping these cultures is leadership.  
kingsfund.org.uk
over 3 years ago