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Joseph Conrad (Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski) | Twórca | Culture.pl

Joseph Conrad (Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski) - A Polish noble who wrote novels in English and was an experienced sailor. His literature dealt with ideas of moral and national responsibility and had themes of fidelity, betrayal, honour and shame.  
culture.pl
over 3 years ago
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Ayn Rand Institute - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Ayn Rand Institute (ARI) is a nonprofit think tank in Irvine, California that promotes Objectivism, a philosophical system developed by author Ayn Rand. Its stated goal is to "spearhead a cultural renaissance that will reverse the anti-reason, anti-individualism, anti-freedom, anti-capitalist trends in today's culture".[2] The organization was established in 1985, three years after Rand's death, by Leonard Peikoff, Rand's legal heir. Its executive director is Yaron Brook.[3]  
en.wikipedia.org
over 3 years ago
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EXPERIENCE OF A MALE OB & GYN IN A MUSLIM CULTURE IN PAKISTAN.

As part of my post retirement ob & gyn activities, I spent two years in the early nineties, working at the Aga Kahn Medical School in Karachi, Pakistan. That is a most modern facility with excellent staff and resources and great medical students. One can imagine that the majority of obstetricians and gynecologists in a muslim country, like Pakistan, are female and that male ob & gyn might encounter some difficulties It was my distinct impression that often it is not the woman herself who objects to being examined and treated by a male, but rather the husband. An anecdote of a real situation which I encountered will illustrate this. One day I was sitting in my office next to the labor and delivery suite as one of the more junior female residents came running into my office, quite excited. “Doctor Le Maire, could you please come quickly? One of the laboring patients has some very major drop in the baby’s heartbeat. I am worried but cannot reach her private doctor and the doctor on call is in the operating room.” I ran over to the delivery suite with the resident and into the patient’s room. She was obviously in much discomfort and her husband was at her side. One of the first things an obstetrician may do when a woman in labor shows signs of some problem with the undelivered baby as evidenced by a drop in the baby’s heart rate, is to examine the woman vaginally. In doing so, the he or she can determine if the baby can be quickly delivered or if there is a reason for the drop in the baby’s heart rate, such as a loop of the umbilical cord being compressed by the head, in which case an immediate C- Section might be necessary. So I immediately put on a pair of sterile gloves and got ready to examine the woman. She herself was perfectly ready to let me do this, but her husband stopped me and told me that he objected to his wife being examined by a male. This was even in the face of a serious situation with potential for harm to his unborn baby. There was no time to be lost trying to reach one of the female attendings, so I did the next best thing and told the very junior resident to take the patient into the operating room and examine her there and let me know the findings, while I was getting the operating room organized to do a C-Section, if called for. The strange thing is that the husband would have let me do a C- Section on his wife, but not a vaginal exam. As it turned out, by the time the patient ended up in the operating room, her private doctor had been located and was in attendance. The outcome was good and a healthy baby was delivered soon after. However the situation could have been quite different and catastrophic. Even stranger to me was that the woman’s husband was not a lay person but actually a chief resident in anesthesiology in the same hospital, with whom I had worked together in the operating room on a number of occasions. I would never have thought that an educated person and a medically educated person at that, would jeopardize the well being of his unborn child and wife, based on cultural and religious beliefs. Later on in the year this same anesthesiology resident came to ask me for a letter of recommendation as he wanted to apply for a specialized fellowship in the USA. I hope that the reader can understand why I politely (perhaps not so politely) refused. Those interested can read more about my experiences in an e book, entitled "Crosscultural Doctoring. On and Off the Beaten Path." One can down load it for free to the reader device of your choice from Smashwords at: http://smashwords.com/books/view/161522. Or just Google Crooscultural Doctoring.  
DR William LeMaire
over 3 years ago
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Authoritarian personality - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Authoritarian personality is a state of mind or attitude characterized by belief in absolute obedience or submission to one's own authority, as well as the administration of that belief through the oppression of one's subordinates. It usually applies to individuals who are known or viewed as having an authoritative, strict, or oppressive personality towards subordinates.  
en.wikipedia.org
over 3 years ago
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Birth order - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Birth order refers to the order a child is born, for example first born, second born etc. Birth order is often believed to have a profound and lasting effect on psychological development. This assertion has been repeatedly challenged;[1] the largest multi-study research suggests zero or near-zero effects.[2] Birth-order theory has the characteristics of a zombie theory,[3] as despite disconfirmation,[2] it continues to have a strong presence in pop psychology and popular culture.[4][5]  
en.wikipedia.org
over 3 years ago
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IF YOU ARE AN EXPAT, AND ENGLISH IS NOT YOUR FIRST LANGUAGE , HAVE YOU HAD TROUBLE WITH IDIOMS?

TROUBLE WITH IDIOMS. After finishing medical school in Louvain Belgium, I came to Schenectady, NY in the US to do my internship. My knowledge of English was what I knew from my high school language classes. this translates into “very little practical knowledge”. At first I struggled but caught on fast (I had to). What did not come so fast was my understanding of the use of idioms. In earlier blogs I related my embarrassment with “pain in the neck” and “prick”. Here is an other one which at the time gave me a red face but now after so many years makes me chuckle. Anne and I lived in a small apartment close to the hospital and got by on a small, very small, salary (this was the late fifties). So did all the other interns. Therefore our entertainment consisted of pot-luck weekend evenings at each other’s apartments on a rotating basis. When it was our turn to host the get together we had told our friends to come around 8:00 pm. In Belgium this means arrival at the earliest around 8:15 or even later. Of course this is quite different in the punctual American culture. That evening the bell rang at 8:01 with the arrival of the first guests. I opened the door, sat them down, started the background music and offered them a drink, as other guests arrived. While they all were sipping their wine, whiskey, or soft drink, someone asked where Anne was. She was still getting ready, not expecting any one until sometime after 8 pm. I told them “Anne is taking a douche.” Now, a douche is actually the French word for shower and is also commonly used in the Dutch language, but of course in the English language that word has quite a different meaning. When I told everyone quite innocently, that Anne was taking a douche, people’s mouths fell open and I could see on their faces the disbelief and hidden thoughts …”what kind of party is this going to be?” A similar confusion occurred toward the end of our stay in Schenectady, when the student nurses, many of whom had befriended Anne, who was now in her first pregnancy, told me that they were planning to give her a baby shower. They asked me not to say anything and keep it as a surprise. However, I felt compelled to warn Anne that she was going to receive a gift of a shower for the baby, rather than a bath. I felt that I needed to prepare her for this unusual gift, as I knew that babies in Belgium are washed in a small bath and not in a shower. Of course we had a good laugh when we realized our misunderstanding. And so it goes!! If you want to read more and similar experiences you can read my book “Crosscultural Doctoring. On and Off the Beaten Path. You can download it for free from Smashwords at: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/161522. Our just google: Crosscultural Doctoring. I would love to hear about similar experiences from people, medical or non medical, around the world who have had difficulty with english idioms.  
DR William LeMaire
over 3 years ago
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Ivan Illich - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ivan Illich (/ɪˈvɑːn ˈɪlɪtʃ/;[1] 4 September 1926 – 2 December 2002) was an Austrian philosopher, Roman Catholic priest, and "maverick social critic"[2] of the institutions of contemporary Western culture and their effects on the provenance and practice of education, medicine, work, energy use, transportation, and economic development.  
en.wikipedia.org
over 3 years ago
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Clark Wissler - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Born in Cambridge City near Hagerstown, Indiana, Wissler graduated from Indiana University in 1897. He received his doctorate in psychology from Columbia University in 1901. After Columbia, Wissler left the field of psychology to focus on Anthropology. Clark Wissler worked at the American Museum of Natural History as a Curator in ethnology from 1902 to 1907. In 1907 Wissler was named Curator of Anthropology when the Archaeology and Ethnology departments were recombined under the Department of Anthropology. Clark Wissler was the first anthropologist to perceive the normative aspect of culture, to define it as learned behavior, and to describe it as a complex of ideas, all characteristics of culture that are today generally accepted.[1] Wissler was a specialist in North American ethnography, focusing on the Indians of the Plains. He contributed to the culture area and age-area ideology of the diffusionist viewpoint that is no longer popular in anthropology. Ball State University in Muncie, Indiana holds the papers of Clark Wissler.[2] Furthermore, one hall of Indiana University's Teter Living Center is known as "Clark Wissler Hall".  
en.wikipedia.org
over 3 years ago
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Diagnosis and Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults - American Family Physician

Community-acquired pneumonia is diagnosed by clinical features (e.g., cough, fever, pleuritic chest pain) and by lung imaging, usually an infiltrate seen on chest radiography. Initial evaluation should determine the need for hospitalization versus outpatient management using validated mortality or severity prediction scores. Selected diagnostic laboratory testing, such as sputum and blood cultures, is indicated for inpatients with severe illness but is rarely useful for outpatients. Initial outpatient therapy should include a macrolide or doxycycline. For outpatients with comorbidities or who have used antibiotics within the previous three months, a respiratory fluoroquinolone (levofloxacin, gemifloxacin, or moxifloxacin), or an oral beta-lactam antibiotic plus a macrolide should be used. Inpatients not admitted to an intensive care unit should receive a respiratory fluoroquinolone, or a beta-lactam antibiotic plus a macrolide. Patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia or who are admitted to the intensive care unit should be treated with a beta-lactam antibiotic, plus azithromycin or a respiratory fluoroquinolone. Those with risk factors for Pseudomonas should be treated with a beta-lactam antibiotic (piperacillin/tazobactam, imipenem/cilastatin, meropenem, doripenem, or cefepime), plus an aminoglycoside and azithromycin or an antipseudomonal fluoroquinolone (levofloxacin or ciprofloxacin). Those with risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus should be given vancomycin or linezolid. Hospitalized patients may be switched from intravenous to oral antibiotics after they have clinical improvement and are able to tolerate oral medications, typically in the first three days. Adherence to the Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines for the management of community-acquired pneumonia has been shown to improve patient outcomes. Physicians should promote pneumococcal and influenza vaccination as a means to prevent community-acquired pneumonia and pneumococcal bacteremia.  
aafp.org
over 3 years ago
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Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus (1992[1]) is a book written by American author and relationship counselor John Gray. The book has sold more than 50 million copies and, according to CNN, it was the "highest ranked work of non-fiction" of the 1990s,[2] spending 121 weeks on the bestseller list. The book and its central metaphor have become a part of popular culture and the foundation for the author's subsequent books, recordings, seminars, theme vacations, one-man Broadway show, TV sitcom, workout videos, a podcast, men's and ladies' apparel lines, fragrances, travel guides and his-and-hers salad dressings.  
en.wikipedia.org
over 3 years ago
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Skin Cancer Patients Face Deadly Risk Using 'Black Salve' Home Remedy

People who fear they have skin cancer, or know it, and decide to try an unapproved product called "black salve" may face infection, scarring and worse cancer outcomes, doctors warn.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Are there still taboos around childbirth? - BBC News

Birth plans often don't bear any resemblance to actual births. Leading expert Susan Wray says they won't until we know what makes birth work - and for that more research is needed.  
bbc.co.uk
over 3 years ago
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JellyBean 033 with Anne Creaton in Fiji

Dr Anne Creaton knee deep in Fiji. Knee deep in another culture. Knee deep in the most beautiful water in the world. Time to talk JellyBeanz  
lifeinthefastlane.com
over 3 years ago
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High level of scrutiny is crushing innovation in NHS, say hospital bosses

NHS hospital bosses have warned that a culture of bullying from “oppressive” regulators has been harming innovation efforts and motivating experienced leaders to leave the NHS.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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Introduction to Psychology 1.0 | Flat World Education

The most fundamental emotions, known as the basic emotionsThe emotions of anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise., are those of anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise. The basic emotions have a long history in human evolution, and they have developed in large part to help us make rapid judgments about stimuli and to quickly guide appropriate behavior (LeDoux, 2000).LeDoux, J. E. (2000). Emotion circuits in the brain. Annual Review of Neuroscience, 23, 155–184. The basic emotions are determined in large part by one of the oldest parts of our brain, the limbic system, including the amygdala, the hypothalamus, and the thalamus. Because they are primarily evolutionarily determined, the basic emotions are experienced and displayed in much the same way across cultures (Ekman, 1992; Elfenbein & Ambady, 2002, 2003; Fridland, Ekman, & Oster, 1987),Ekman, P. (1992). Are there basic emotions? Psychological Review, 99(3), 550–553; Elfenbein, H. A., & Ambady, N. (2002). On the universality and cultural specificity of emotion recognition: A meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 128, 203–23; Fridlund, A. J., Ekman, P., & Oster, H. (1987). Facial expressions of emotion. In A. Siegman & S. Feldstein (Eds.), Nonverbal behavior and communication (2nd ed., pp. 143–223). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. and people are quite accurate at judging the facial expressions of people from different cultures. View "Video Clip: The Basic Emotions" to see a demonstration of the basic emotions.  
catalog.flatworldknowledge.com
over 3 years ago
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FDA Retreats From Recall of Scope-Cleaning Machines

After a wave of sometimes-deadly superbug infections, the agency last year ordered a recall of Custom Ultrasonics machines used to disinfect medical scopes. Now, with little explanation, it is backing off.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Culture of Health: Why Your Patients' Home Environment Matters

Susan Hassmiller explain nursing's role in building a culture of health.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Tennessee Law to Allow Counselors to Deny Service Based on Beliefs

Tennessee's Republican governor on Wednesday signed a law allowing mental health counselors to refuse service to patients on "sincerely held principles," the latest in a string of U.S. state measures criticized as discriminatory against the gay community.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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MALDI-TOF MS Carbapenemase Detection From Culture Isolates

The authors present a MALDI-TOF MS-based assay for the detection of carbapenemases either from solid culture media or blood culture vials.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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What Do Nurses Know (and Not Know) About Urine Samples for Culture?

A survey of nurses reveals some misunderstandings about the indications for, and correct methods of obtaining, urine specimens from patients with urinary catheters.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago