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11
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Heart Attack: Signs and Symptoms

Millions of people suffer heart attacks every year. A heart attack can damage the heart’s function, and even lead to death. Learn what happens during a heart...  
youtube.com
over 1 year ago
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10
148

Adequate Vitamin C Linked to Lower Risk for Heart Disease

High vitamin C levels may be the primary reason why people who eat lots of fruits and vegetables have lower risk of heart disease and early death.  
articles.mercola.com
almost 2 years ago
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5
57

Renal replacement therapy in the ICU

Acute kidney injury increases the risk of poor outcome and death. This presentation looks at diagnostic criteria, impact on outcome, and reviews the features and characteristics of the main types of renal replacement therapy available.  
Andrew Ferguson
over 6 years ago
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Cell Injury and Death

Struggling with Pathology? Why not join Howard Reisner, co-author of the bestselling Rubin’s Pathology, and Essentials of Rubin's Pathology, about Cell Injury and death. In it, he covers a variety of essential topics. For more information, or to purchase your copy of one of Dr Reisner’s books, visit [www.lww.co.uk](http://lww.co.uk). Save 15% (and get free P&P) on this, and a whole host of other [LWW titles](http://lww.co.uk) when you use the code MEDUCATION when you check out!  
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
over 4 years ago
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5
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Death is 'core business' of Scottish hospitals, university study finds - BBC News

Almost one in three hospital patients in Scotland will die within a year, and nearly one in 10 will die during their time in hospital, a study has found.  
BBC News
over 3 years ago
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5
122

Asthma death: Mother 'shattered' after ambulance delay - BBC News

A mother describes the pain of losing her daughter to asthma, when an ambulance went to the wrong address.  
BBC News
over 3 years ago
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2
98

Glaucoma

Definition – gradual death of the optic nerve often associated with high intraocular pressure   High intraocular pressure is usually due to aqueous humour production and drainage imbalance   The Aqueous pathway  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 3 years ago
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4
60

Pressure Ulcers

A pressure ulcer is a sore that results from the death of the skin and its underlying tissue in areas of the body that receive pressure. This occurs when a p...  
youtube.com
over 1 year ago
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Death verification

Poster to help with death verification  
Martin Wicks
over 8 years ago
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4
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Poo transplants

When is it medically advisable to eat some one else's poo? When you need a poo transplant. Poo transplants could be the solution to one of the biggest problems facing the NHS today- the bacterial infection Clostridium difficile. C.diff, as it's known to its friends, infects about 18,000 people in England and Wales every year and is involved in the deaths of about 2000 people. C.diff typically arises due to imbalances in the normal gut bacteria. The gut is like a city, a city with about 100 trillion bacterial residents happily munching away on a banquet of bowel contents. The average person has about 1000 different types of bacteria in their gut, and about 3% of healthy adults have C.diff in that mix. The C.diff doesn't cause them any problems because its numbers are kept in check by the other gut bacteria. However treatment with broad spectrum antibiotics such as clindamycin, cephalosporins, ciprofloxacin and co-amoxiclav, can disrupt this happy community- killing off vast swathes of bacteria but crucially not the C.diff. Given free rein the C.diff multiplies rapidly and produces toxins which damage the gut. In some people this causes mild diarrhoea and abdominal pain, in others it can lead to torrential diarrhoea, perforation of the colon and death. Traditional treatment includes stopping any broad spectrum antibiotics and possibly prescribing antibiotics which target the C.diff such as metronidazole or vancomycin. However with antibiotic use comes the risk of resistance. Moreover our current approach isn't entirely effective and about 22% of patients treated suffer a recurrence. This can result in a cycle of illness and hospital admission which is costly to the patient and the hospital. So it's time to start thinking outside of the box. Cue the poo transplant. The thinking goes like this- if the cause of the problem is disruption to the normal community of gut bacteria, why not just pop those bacteria back in to crowd out the C.diff? Simples. Practically, the first step is to identify a donor, usually a close relative of the patient, and screen them for a range of infectious diseases and parasites. It's also advisable to make sure they haven't recently consumed anything the intended recipient is allergic to, before asking them to make their "donation". You then pop it in a household blender and blitz it down, adding saline or milk to achieve a slurry consistency. Next you need to strain your concoction to remove large materials- one medic in the UK uses coffee filters. Top tip. Then you're ready to administer it- about 25ml from above (e.g. via nasogastric tube), or 250ml from below. Now, its important to note that poo transplants are still an experimental treatment. To date only small case studies have been carried out, but with 200 total reported cases, an average cure rate of 96% and no serious adverse events reported to date, it's worth carrying out a large trial to assess it thoroughly. Poo transplants- arguably the ideal treatment for a cash strapped NHS. It's cheap, plentiful and it seems to work. Now to convince people to consume someone else's poo... Bottoms up! FYI: This was first posted on my own blog. Image Courtesy of Marcus007 at de.wikipedia [Public domain], from Wikimedia Commons  
Dr Catherine Carver
over 4 years ago
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4
121

A healthy environment can prevent heart disease

Cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including heart disease and stroke, are the n°1 killer worldwide and in Europe, where they cause the death of over 10 000 people daily, i.e. more than all cancers combined (1).  
escardio.org
about 2 years ago
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6
48

Birth asphyxia and Hypoxic-Ischaemic Injury: Prognosis and Management

This presentation summarises mechanism of injury in HIE, and goes through current and future treatment potentials. It also communicates some of the potential medico-legal risks in this field of medicine.  
Charlotte Patterson
over 6 years ago
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3
48

Inactivity, disability, and death are all interlinked

Physical activity has long been recognised as an important determinant of health and longevity, and many countries have explicit physical activity guidelines for promoting health.1 2 The corollary of this is that people who do not meet the guidelines, a substantial proportion of the population,3 are at risk of worse health. However, relatively little attention has been given to the question of how much activity is needed to make a difference. Although this is not explicitly their primary purpose, two new papers shed light on this question. Dunlop and colleagues (doi:10.1136/bmj.g2472) followed a cohort of people who had mild to moderate osteoarthritis or were at risk of osteoarthritis to look at the development of disability over two years.4 Cooper and colleagues (doi:10.1136/bmj.g2219) estimated the relation between physical capability in midlife—as indicated by grip strength, chair rise speed, and standing balance—and later mortality.5 Both showed that the relation between inactivity and risk of disability or death is not linear: people …  
bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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2
149

Life and Death Battle | Curiosity: Battlefield Cell

Gym this is the final stage in an epic battle in one of the longest wars in human history it's a battle that rages inside each one of us every single day a trillion times over on this battlefield was once a healthy human cell now it's disintegrating into tiny pieces it a virus has overrun its defenses and unleashed an army of clones in army whose sole focus is to reproduce and destroy as many cells in our body as possible resulting in disease or even death now using the latest scientific research curiosity exposes this one's invisible world revealing as never before the life-and-death battle for a human cell  
youtube.com
almost 2 years ago
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Journal club: Raised glucose levels predict death for patients with pneumonia

Stream Journal club: Raised glucose levels predict death for patients with pneumonia by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 3 years ago
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The power of the story: teaching doctors to ‘feel’ patient-centred care

Following the death of her 21-year-old son, Margaret Murphy, external lead of the WHO’s Patients for Patient Safety programme, has been teaching doctors and students how an engaged, knowledgeable patient can be the key resource in his or her own care  
theguardian.com
about 2 years ago
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Saudi Mers death toll passes 100 - BBC News

Saudi Arabia says more than 100 patients infected with the Mers coronavirus have now died since the outbreak began in 2012.  
BBC News
over 3 years ago
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Gunshot victims to be suspended between life and death

Doctors will try to save the lives of 10 patients with knife or gunshot wounds by placing them in suspended animation, buying time to fix their injuries  
newscientist.com
over 3 years ago
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Constant arguing 'increases premature death risk' - BBC News

Having frequent arguments with partners, friends or relatives can increase the risk of death in middle-age, say Danish researchers.  
BBC News
over 3 years ago