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DiabetesComplications

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20
417

Diabetic Foot Examination - OSCE Guide

The ability to carry out a thorough and slick diabetic foot examination is something every medic needs to master. This video aims to give you an idea of what's required in the OSCE and you can then customise the examination to suit your own personal style. Make sure to head over to http://geekymedics.com/2010/10/10/diabetic-foot-examination/ to see the written guide alongside the video. Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/geekymedics Follow us on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/geekymedics You should always adhere to your medical schools / local hospital trusts guidelines when performing examinations or clinical procedures.  
OSCE Videos
over 5 years ago
Preview
12
496

Diabetic Feet

Diabetic feet for SW revision course  
Dr Alastair Buick
over 5 years ago
Preview
6
210

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Endocrinology | Fastbleep

Fastbleep offers the opportunity to support a growing social network of healthcare students and educators as they consider patient care, undertake professional development and share knowledge.  
fastbleep.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
43

Diabetes complication rates fall markedly in the US, says CDC study

Rates of five serious complications related to diabetes—myocardial infarction, stroke, end stage kidney failure, lower limb amputation, and death from hyperglycemia — have all decreased among adults with diabetes in the US over the past two decades, according to a new study by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).1  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
28

Diabetes complication rates fall markedly in the US, says CDC study

Rates of five serious complications related to diabetes—myocardial infarction, stroke, end stage kidney failure, lower limb amputation, and death from hyperglycemia — have all decreased among adults with diabetes in the US over the past two decades, according to a new study by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).1  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
23

Diabetes complication rates fall markedly in the US, says CDC study | The BMJ

Rates of five serious complications related to diabetes—myocardial infarction, stroke, end stage kidney failure, lower limb amputation, and death from hyperglycemia — have all decreased among adults with diabetes in the US over the past two decades, according to a new study by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - currently located behind a paywall. Your institution may have access through Athens/Elservier or similar.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
25

Diabetes complication rates fall markedly in the US, says CDC study

Rates of five serious complications related to diabetes—myocardial infarction, stroke, end stage kidney failure, lower limb amputation, and death from hyperglycemia — have all decreased among adults with diabetes in the US over the past two decades, according to a new study by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).1  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
21

Diabetes complication rates fall markedly in the US, says CDC study

Rates of five serious complications related to diabetes—myocardial infarction, stroke, end stage kidney failure, lower limb amputation, and death from hyperglycemia — have all decreased among adults with diabetes in the US over the past two decades, according to a new study by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).1  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
32

Painful diabetic neuropathy

Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined.  
www.bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
22

Painful diabetic neuropathy

Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined.  
www.bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
19

Painful diabetic neuropathy

Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined.  
www.bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
54

Painful diabetic neuropathy

Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined.  
www.bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
15

Painful diabetic neuropathy

Diabetes is a worldwide epidemic, and associated neuropathy is its most costly and disabling complication. Given the rising prevalence of painful diabetic neuropathy, it is increasingly important that we understand the best ways to diagnose and treat this condition. Diagnostic tests in this field are evolving rapidly. These include the use of skin biopsies to measure small unmyelinated fibers, as well as even newer techniques that can measure both small unmyelinated fibers and large myelinated fibers in the same biopsy. The main treatments for painful diabetic neuropathy remain management of the underlying diabetes and drugs for the relief of pain. However, emerging evidence points to major differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including the ability of glycemic control to prevent neuropathy. Enhanced glucose control is much more effective at preventing neuropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes than in those with type 2 disease. This dichotomy emphasizes the need to study the pathophysiologic differences between the two types of diabetes, because different treatments may be needed for each condition. The impact of the metabolic syndrome on neuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes may account for the difference between the two types of diabetes and requires further study. Finally, neuropathic pain is under-recognized and undertreated despite an ever evolving list of effective drugs. Evidence exists to support several drugs, but the optimal sequence and combination of these drugs are still to be determined.  
www.bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
57

The Diabetic Foot Exam

An overview and demonstration of the diabetic foot exam, including inspection for common deformities, evaluation of vascular supply, and screening for neurop...  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
Preview
1
44

The Diabetic Foot Exam

An overview and demonstration of the diabetic foot exam, including inspection for common deformities, evaluation of vascular supply, and screening for neurop...  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
17

More children showing early signs of serious diabetes complications, audit finds

Over a thousand more children in England and Wales had diabetes in 2013-14 than the previous year, an audit has found, with potentially serious complications at a level described as “worryingly high.”  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
13
0
31

Increased GFR or decreased GFR in DM causes diabetic nephropathy?

Hi everyone, I am a little confused about the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy in DM. Is it... ...hyperglycaemia inducing vasodilation in the renal arteries ---> increased GFR ---> damage to the glomerulus ---> eventually, end stage renal disease? OR ...hyaline arterial stenosis of renal arteries ---> decreased GFR ---> nephrotic syndrome ---> end stage renal disease? OR ...hyperglycaemia inducing matrix proliferation in the glomerulus ---> decreased GFR ---> damage to the glomerulus ---> end stage renal disease? OR ...none of the above? Would appreciate it if anyone who can shed some light! Thanks!  
Syaza Faizul
almost 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 y4lule?1444774066
1
2587

Staying Active with Diabetes

Many know that engaging in regular physical activity and exercise will tremendously improve one’s health and overall well-being. This goes the same, if not tenfold, for individuals suffering with diabetes. However, before rushing in a high intensity or physically straining physical régime, consult with your diabetes care provider. Make sure to discuss your plans take note of any precautions that may be needed to be made prior or during these activities. It will be interesting to know that individuals with type 2 diabetes who do participate in some exercise (even at work) reduce their risk for heart disease. Remember that a physical examination that focuses on the signs and symptoms of diseases affecting the heart and blood vessels, eyes, feet, nervous system, and kidneys must be made in advance before any extensive work out plan takes into action. Any strenuous strength training or high-impact exercise is generally not recommended for people with uncontrolled diabetes. Such strain caused by these exercises can weaken blood vessels in the eyes of patients who suffer from the common diabetic complication known as retinopathy. High-impact exercise can also injure blood vessels in the feet. In fact, diabetes can contribute to foot problems in several ways: diabetic neuropathy; which is a nerve disorder that causes numbing and pain in the hands, legs and feet as well as damage to internal organs; also poor circulation to the feet is another problem that can be associated due to diabetes. Keeping this in mind it is imperative to keeping your feet healthy, investing in some great therapeutic footwear like these can be a great step in moving toward healthy feet! One thing is for sure, physical activity can increase the health in anyone’s life. Always make sure to take care of your body and take the extra precautions needed in order to maintain proper health.  
Camille Mitchell
over 6 years ago
Preview
0
14

Diabetes Complications with Dr. Villafuerte

Dr. Betty Villafuerte is an Associate Professor at the University of Louisville. Her clinical interests are obesity, diabetes, and hypoglycemia. In this lect...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
10

Study finds minimal ethnic differences in health among older insured patients with diabetes

In one of the first studies of its kind, researchers found that the prevalence of geriatric conditions and diabetic complications among older, insured patients with diabetes did not vary...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago