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10
5
116

Aortoiliac Occlusive Disease

Slideshow includes overview, clinical picture, diagnosis, treatment and procedures.  
youtube.com
almost 4 years ago
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5
431

Figure 4-1b, [STEP WISE APPROACH FOR MANAGING ASTHMA IN CHILDREN 5–11 YEARS OF AGE]. - Expert Panel Report 3: Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma - NCBI Bookshelf

National Asthma Education and Prevention Program, Third Expert Panel on the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma. Expert Panel Report 3: Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma. Bethesda (MD): National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (US); 2007 Aug.  
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
over 3 years ago
10
4
56

Pancreatitis - Part 1

This is an initial presentation of the causes and diagnosis of acute pancreatitis.    
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
about 9 years ago
0
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43

The Febrile Child

One of the most challenging patient presentations can be that of the febrile child. The younger the child, the potentially more difficult the diagnosis. In this podcast we give an approach to assessment and management of the febrile child that provides a good balance between making the correct diagnosis and not over-investigating children, especially as [...]  
Dr Peter Kas
about 9 years ago
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4
36

Approach to a young hypertensive patient: Investigations and diagnosis

Slide presentation on young hypertention covering the differential diagnosis, investigation and approach.  
malek ahmad
almost 7 years ago
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215

Utility of Renal function tests and value in differential diagnosis in renal, metabolic, and endocrine disorders.

RFT are commonly performed investigations to rule out underlying disorders, routinely, and have great value for diagnosis, treatment, and early detection of the disease.  
Ashok Solanki
about 6 years ago
8
4
187

Station 1 Sample Respiratory Examination Bronchiectasis, Thoracoplasty, Kyhoscoliosis

Here's a sample of the latest MRCP PACES Videos in High Definition format. MRCP Video package is divided to 5 stations, each including a Variety of Cases & Clinical Skills essential for all Future Doctors. There's also a lot of extra content including: Spot Diagnosis Videos, Exam Simulation Videos, Quick Cases, Patient Simulator Program, Surgical Skills Videos, Clinical Examination Videos from a Variety of Universities around the World, An Extensive Collection of E-books & Q-Bank including thousands of Questions and simulatory exams. If you interested in buying soft or hard copies shipped to your location, please visit our channel or contact us by e-mail: Jackfree4@hotmail.com Thank you!  
MRCP Videos
over 5 years ago
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284

Diagnosis, Pathology and Management of Hypertension

All images in this article taken from the Nice guidelines on Hypertension, and reproduced in accordance with the terms on conditions of the author.   WHO criteria for defining hypertension: Under 50 – should try to get it under 140/90  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
Maxresdefault
4
186

Pulmonary Function Tests (PFT): Lesson 2 - Spirometry

A discussion of FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC ratio, and the flow volume loop, including how these are used in the diagnosis of various lung diseases, with a particula...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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4
59

Kawasaki disease: diagnosis and treatment

Kawasaki disease is diagnosed off the presence of symptoms rather than the results of tests. Symptoms include: conjunctivitis, rash, adenopathy, strawberry t...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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4
32

Acyanotic heart disease diagnosis

How do we know a patient has an acyanotic heart disease? Learn how health care professionals use a variety of tools to diagnosis these conditions, such as st...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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4
102

The Thyroid Exam and Physical Diagnosis of Thyroid Disease

Includes a demonstration of the standard thyroid exam, review of the etiologies of goiters, and an overview of the many physical findings of hypothyroidism a...  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
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LWW: Case Of The Month - April 2013

This month’s case is by David R Bell PhD, co-author of Medical Physiology: Principles for Clinical Medicine, 3e (ISBN: 9781451110395) For more information, or to purchase your copy, visit: http://tiny.cc/Rhoades4e, with 15% off using the discount code: MEDUCATION. The case below is followed by a quiz question, allowing you a choice of diagnoses. Select the one letter section that best describes the patient’s condition. The Case A 28-year old woman has an unremarkable pregnancy through her first 28 weeks of gestation, with normal weight gain and no serious complications. She has no previous history of diabetes, hypertension of other systemic disease before or during her current pregnancy. During her 30-week checkup, her blood pressure measures 128/85, and she complains about feeling slightly more “bloated” than usual with swelling in her legs that seems to get more uncomfortable as the day goes on. Her obsterician recommends that she get more bed rest, stay off her feet as much as possible and return for evaluation in one week. At the one-week follow-up, the patient presents with noticable”puffiness” in her face, and a blood pressure of 145/95. She complains she has been developing headaches, sporadic blurred vision, right-sided discomfort and some shortness of breath. She has gained more than 10 lb (4.5kg) in the past week. A urinalysis on the patient revelas no glucose but a 3+ reading for protein. Her obstetrician decides to admit her immediately to a local tertiary care hospital for further evaluation. Over the next 24 hours, the patient’s urine output is recorded as 500mL and contains 6.8 grams of protein. Her plasma albumin level is 3.1 g/dl, hemacrit 48%, indirect bilirubin 1.5mg/dl and blood platelets=77000/uL, respectively. Her blood pressure is now 190/100. It is decided to try to deliver the foetus. The expelled placenta is small and shows signs of widespread ischmic damage. Within a week of delivery, the mother’s blood pressure returns to normal, and her oedema subsides. One month later, the mother shows no ill effects of thos later-term syndrome. Question What is the clinical diagnosis of this patient’s condition and its underlying pathophysiology? A. Gestational Hypertension B. Preeclampsia C. Gestational Diabetes D. Compression of the Inferior Vena Cava Answer The correct answer is "B. Preeclampsia". The patient’s symptoms and laboratory findings are consistent with a diagnosis of Preeclampsia, which is a condition occurring in some pregnancies that causes life-threatening organ and whole body regulatory malfunctions. The patient’s negative urine glucose is inconsistent with gestational diabetes. Gestational hypertension or vena caval compression cannot explain all of the patient findings. The patient has three major abnormal findings- generalised oedema, hypertension and proteinuria which are all common in preeclampsia. Although sequalae of a normal pregnancy can include water and salt retention, bloating, modest hypertension and leg swelling (secondary to capillary fluid loss from increased lower limb capillary hydrostatic pressure due to compression of the inferior vena cava by the growing foetus/uterus), oedema in the head and upper extremities, a rapid 10 pound weight gain and shortness of breath suggests a generalized and serious oedematous state. The patient did not have hypertension before or within 20 weeks gestation (primary hypertension) and did not develop hypertension after the 20th week of pregnancy with no other abnormal findings (gestational hypertension). Hypertension with proteinuria occurring beyond the 20th week of pregnancy however is a hallmark of preeclampsia. In addition, the patient has hemolysis (elevated bilirubin and LDH levels), elevated liver enzyme levels and thrombocytopenia. This is called the HELLP syndrome (HELLP = Hemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes and Low Platelets.), and is considered evidence of serious patient deterioration in preeclampsia. A urine output of 500 ml in 24 hours is 1/2 to 1/4 of normal output in a hydrated female and indicates renal insufficiency. Protein should never be found in the urine and indicates loss of capillaries integrity in glomeruli which normally are not permeable to proteins. The patient has substantial 24 urine protein loss and hypoalbuminemia. However, generally plasma albumin levels must drop below 2.5 gm/dl to decrease plasma oncotic pressure enough to cause general oedema. The patient’s total urinary protein loss was insufficient in this regard. Capillary hyperpermeability occurs with preeclampsia and, along with hypertension, could facilitate capillary water efflux and generalized oedema. However myogenic constriction of pre-capillary arterioles could reduce the effect of high blood pressure on capillary water efflux. An early increase in hematocrit in this patient suggests hemoconcentration which could be caused by capillary fluid loss but the patient’s value of 48 is unremarkable and of little diagnostic value because increased hematocrit occurs in both preeclampsia and normal pregnancy. PGI2, PGE2 and NO, produced during normal pregnancy, cause vasorelaxation and luminal expansion of uterine arteries, which supports placental blood flow and development. Current theory suggests that over production of endothelin, thromboxane and oxygen radicals in preeclampsia antagonize vasorelaxation while stimulating platelet aggregation, microthrombi formation and endothelial destruction. These could cause oedema, hypertension, renal/hepatic deterioration and placental ischemia with release of vasotoxic factors. The patient’s right-sided pain is consistent with liver pathology (secondary to hepatic DIC or oedematous distention). Severe hypertension in preeclampsia can lead to maternal end organ damage, stroke, and death. Oedematous distension of the liver can cause hepatic rupture and internal hemorrhagic shock. Having this patient carry the baby to term markedly risks the life of the mother and is not considered current acceptable clinical practice. Delivery of the foetus and termination of the pregnancy is the only certain way to end preeclampsia. Read more This case is by David R Bell PhD, co-author of Medical Physiology: Principles for Clinical Medicine, 3e (ISBN: 9781451110395) For more information, or to purchase your copy, visit: http://tiny.cc/Rhoades4e. Save 15% (and get free P&P) on this, and a whole host of other LWW titles at (lww.co.uk)[http://lww.co.uk] when you use the code MEDUCATION when you check out! About LWW/ Wolters Kluwer Health Lippincott Williams and Wilkins (LWW) is a leading publisher of high-quality content for students and practitioners in medical and related fields. Their text and review products, eBooks, mobile apps and online solutions support students, educators, and instiutions throughout the professional’s career. LWW are proud to partner with Meducation.  
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
over 6 years ago
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4
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Asthma Explained Clearly | 2 of 2

Understand asthma with this clear explanation by Dr. Roger Seheult. Further discussion on the diagnosis, methacholine challenge test, and stepwise approach f...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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4
156

Childhood Urinary Tract Infection. Bladder Infection Treatment | Patient

The diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI) in young children is important as a marker for urinary tract abnormalities. It may be associated with life-threatening...  
patient.info
about 4 years ago
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4
21

Drug induced Rash with Dr. Owen

Dr. Cindy Owen gives an overview of cutaneous drug reactions and an approach to diagnosis and treatment in this image-driven lecture. She spends time on urti...  
youtube.com
about 4 years ago
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3
36

Diagnosis and Management of Bladder Cancer

Diagnosis and Management of Bladder Cancer  
Stephen McAleer
over 6 years ago
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3
260

Bacterial Etiologies of Common Infections (Antibiotics - Lecture 2)

A summary of the role and composition of normal flora, the typical bacterial pathogens causing several common infectious diseases, diagnosis of UTI, and interpretation as to whether a positive blood culture represents true infection or contamination. Bonus points to anyone who can identify the mystery portrait.  
Nicole Chalmers
over 5 years ago
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Emphysema - Introduction, Types, Symptoms, Diagnosis

https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan  
Nicole Chalmers
over 5 years ago
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3
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Caesarian Section

C-section is major surgery, with real risks, and the decision to perform such an operation should not be taken lightly!   Epidemiology Incidence in increasing, mainly due to the increased diagnoses of fetal distress, as diagnosed by CTG monitoring. Also increasing used for non-longitudinal lies (e.g. breech, transverse) WHO recommends not >15% of deliveries should be via c-section  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago