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Health and medicine

The medical world can be a confusing place. Patients and their families might feel overwhelmed by the large vocabularies and complicated explanations they get from their health care providers. Students entering health care also struggle to grasp the complexity of health sciences, and are forced to memorize huge amounts of information. We hope to make understanding the medical world a bit easier. Look around! These videos do not provide medical advice and are for informational purposes only. The videos are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay seeking it because of something you have read or seen in any Khan Academy video.  
Khan Academy
over 5 years ago
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Leukemia diagnosis

Often health care professionals conduct a variety of blood tests to determine if someone has leukemia. Leukemia patients often have decreased levels of plate...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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Differential Diagnosis of SI Joint Pain - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Educational video describing differential diagnosis of SI joint pain. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: h...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 184etvn?1444773944
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Aspergillus and Human Health

Many may be familiar with aspergillosis as the infecting agent in acute cases where the patient is severely immunocompromised - but there is more to this fungus' repertoire. There are rare cases where the patient's immune system is overwhelmed by a large inhalation of spores e.g. after gardening, but these are insignificant in terms of total numbers effected. The following are far more common:- Aspergillus and other fungi are increasingly identified as the active agent in sinusitis - if you have cases that don't respond to antibiotics this is worth thinking about. Chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA & aspergilloma) is an infection of immunocompetent people, causing respiratory difficulty, coughing and haemoptysis. The UK NHS has a specialist centre for these patients In Manchester (National Aspergillosis Centre (NAC)). NAC has particular expertise and extensive facilities for the diagnosis of CPA, ABPA, SAFS and use of systemic antifungal drugs. Allergic infection (Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis - ABPA and chronic sinusitis) is thought to be heavily underdiagnosed and undertreated. ABPA is particularly common in Asthma, Cystic Fibrosis patients and those with bronchiectasis. There is estimated to be 25 000 cases in the UK alone. Many (50%) of the most severe asthma cases are sensitive to fungi (SAFS) - in particular Aspergillus. These tend to be the most unstable cases that don't respond to antibiotics and several studies have been published that show giving an antifungal helps reduce the use of steroids for these patients. Last but not least - Tuberculosis is on the rise in the UK and the rest of the world. It is estimated that 2% of cases progress to CPA and should be treated using an antifungal - this is usually not done until considerable time has passed and much damage has been done. In total it is estimated that many millions of people across the world suffer from aspergillus - ABPA - 5 million, Tb - 400 000 per year and Asthma (SAFS - 1 - 4 million cases in EU & US). Sinusitis cases may number many tens of millions worldwide. So - the next time you assume aspergillus infections and aspergillosis are rare and confined to those who are profoundly immunocompromised - think again! If you have a patient who has increasingly severe respiratory symptoms, doesn't respond to multiple courses of antibiotics then give aspergillus a thought. Browse around these articles for further information Aspergillus Website Treatment Section. NB For a broader look at the prevalence of fungal diseases worldwide the new charity Leading International Fungal Education (LIFE) website is worth looking at.  
Graham Atherton
over 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 7owyf5?1444773963
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Benchmarking Outpatient Referral Rates

Introduction GPs for a little while have been asked to compare each other’s outpatient referrals rates. The idea is that this peer to peer open review will help us understand each others referral patterns. For some reason and due to a natural competitive nature of human behaviour, I think we have these peer to peer figures put to us to try to get us to refer less into hospital outpatients. It’s always hard to benchmark GP surgeries but outpatient referral benchmarking is particularly poor for several reasons It's Very Difficult to Normalise Surgeries Surgeries have different mortalities morbidities ages and other confounding factors that it becomes very hard to create an algorithm to create a weighting factor to properly compare one surgery against another. There Are Several Reasons For The Referral I’ll go into more detail on this point later but there are several reasons why doctors refer patients into hospital which can range from: doctors knowing a lot about the condition and picking up subtle symptoms and signs lesser experienced doctors would have ignored; all the way to not knowing about the condition and needing some advice from an expert in the condition. We Need To Look At The Bigger Picture The biggest killer to our budget is non-elective admissions and it’s the one area where patient, commissioner and doctor converge. Patients want to keep out of hospital, it’s cheaper for the NHS and Doctors don’t like the lack of continuity when patients go in. For me I see every admission to hospital as a fail. Of course it’s more complex than this and it might be totally appropriate but if we work on this concept backwards, it will help us more. Likewise if we try to reduce outpatient referrals because we are pressurised to, they may end up in hospitalisation and cost the NHS £10,000s rather than £100s as an outpatient. We need to look at the bigger picture and refer especially if we believe that referrals will lead to less hospitalisation of patients further down the line. To put things into perspective 2 symptoms patients present which I take very seriously are palpitations in the elderly and breathlessness. Both symptoms are very real and normally lead to undiagnosed conditions which if we don’t tackle and diagnose early enough will cause patients to deteriorate and end up in hospital. Education, Education, Education When I first went into commissioning as a lead in 2006 I had this idea of getting to the bottom of why GPs refer patients to outpatients. The idea being if we knew why, we would know how to best tackle specialities. I asked my GPs to record which speciality to refer to and why they referred over a 7 month period. The reason for admission was complex but we divided them up into these categories: 2nd care input required for management of the condition. We know about the condition but have drawn the line with what we can do in primary care. An example of this is when we’ve done a 24 hour tape and found a patient has 2sec pauses and needs a pace maker. 2nd care input required for diagnosis. We think this patient has these symptoms which are related to this condition but don’t really know about the diagnosis and need help with this. An example of this is when a patient presents with diarrhoea to a gastroenterologist There could be several reasons for this and we need help from the gastroenterologist to confirm the diagnosis via a colonscopy and ogd etc. Management Advice. We know what the patient has but need help with managing the condition. For example uncontrolled heart failure or recurrent sinusitis. Consultant to Consultant Referral. As advised between consultants. Patient Choice. Sometimes the patient just wants to see the hospital doctor. The results are enclosed here in Excel and displayed below. Please click on the graph thumbnail below. Reasons For Referrals Firstly a few disclaimers and thoughts. These figures were before any GPSI ENT, Dermatology or Musculosketal services which probably would have made an impact on the figures. There are a few anomalies which may need further thought eg I’m surprised Rheumatology for 2nd input for diagnosis is so low, as frequently I have patients with high ESRs and CRPs which I need advise on diagnoses. Also audiology medicine doesn’t quite look right. The cardiology referral is probably high for management advise due to help on ECG interpretation although this is an assumption. This is just a 7 month period from a subset of 8-9 GPs. Although we were careful to explain each category and it’s meaning, more work might need to be done to clarify the findings further. In my opinion the one area where GPs need to get grips with is management advice as it’s an admission that I know what the patient has and need help on how to treat them. This graph is listed in order of management advice for this reason. So what do you do to respond to this? The most logical step is to education GPs on the left hand side of this graph and invest in your work force but more and more I see intermediary GPSI services which are the provider arm of a commissioning group led to help intercept referrals to hospital. In favour of the data most of the left hand side of the graph have been converted into a GPSI service at one point. In my area what has happened is that referrals rates have actually gone up into these services with no decline in the outgoing speciality as GPs become dis-empowered and just off load any symptoms which patients have which they would have probably had a higher threshold to refer on if these GPSI services were not available. Having said that GPSI services can have a role in the pathway and I’m not averse to their implementation, we just have to find a better way to use their services. 3 Step Plan As I’m not one to just give problems here are my 3 suggestions to help referrals. To have a more responsive Layered Outpatient Service. Setting up an 18 week target for all outpatients is strange, as symptoms and specialities need to be prioritised. For example I don’t mind waiting 20 weeks for a ENT referral on a condition which is bothering me but not life threatening but need to only have a 3 week turn over if I’m breathless with a sudden reduction in my exercise tolerance. This adds an extra layer of complexity but always in the back of my mind it’s about getting them seen sooner to prevent hospitalisation. Education, education, education It’s ironic that the first budget to be slashed in my area was education. We need to education our GPs to empower them to bring the management advice category down as this is the category which will make the biggest impact to improving health care. In essence we need to focus on working on the left hand side of this graph first. Diagnose Earlier and Refer Appropriately The worst case scenario is when GPs refer patients to the wrong speciality and it can happen frequently as symptoms blur between conditions. This leads to delayed diagnosis, delayed management and you guessed it, increased hospitalisation. The obvious example is whether patients with breathlessness is caused by heart or lung or is psychogenic. As GPs we need to work up patients appropriately and make a best choice based on the evidence in front of us. Peer to peer GP delayed referral letter analysis groups have a place in this process. Conclusion At the end of the day it's about appropriate referrals always, not just a reduction. Indeed for us to get a grip on the NHS Budgets as future Clinical Commissioners, I would expect outpatient referrals to go up at the expense of non-elective, as then you are looking at patients being seen and diagnosed earlier and kept out of hospital.  
Raza Toosy
over 6 years ago
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Prostate and Bladder Cancer Staging and Grading - A review for students

Amended from Wikipedia and other sources T.I Lemon Stage means spread Grade means histology Prostate cancer staging – spread of the cancer There are two schemes commonly used to stage prostate cancer. TMN and Whitmore Jewett Stage I disease is cancer that is found incidentally in a small part of the sample when prostate tissue was removed for other reasons, such as benign prostatic hypertrophy, and the cells closely resemble normal cells and the gland feels normal to the examining finger Stage II more of the prostate is involved and a lump can be felt within the gland. Stage III, the tumour has spread through the prostatic capsule and the lump can be felt on the surface of the gland. In Stage IV disease, the tumour has invaded nearby structures, or has spread to lymph nodes or other organs. Grading - Gleason Grading System is based on cellular content and tissue architecture from biopsies, which provides an estimate of the destructive potential and ultimate prognosis of the disease. TX: cannot evaluate the primary tumor T0: no evidence of tumor T1: tumor present, but not detectable clinically or with imaging • T1a: tumor was incidentally found in less than 5% of prostate tissue resected (for other reasons) • T1b: tumor was incidentally found in greater than 5% of prostate tissue resected • T1c: tumor was found in a needle biopsy performed due to an elevated serum PSA T2: the tumor can be felt (palpated) on examination, but has not spread outside the prostate • T2a: the tumor is in half or less than half of one of the prostate gland's two lobes • T2b: the tumor is in more than half of one lobe, but not both • T2c: the tumor is in both lobes but within the prostatic capsule • T3: the tumor has spread through the prostatic capsule (if it is only part-way through, it is still T2) • T3a: the tumor has spread through the capsule on one or both sides • T3b: the tumor has invaded one or both seminal vesicles • T4: the tumor has invaded other nearby structures It should be stressed that the designation "T2c" implies a tumor which is palpable in both lobes of the prostate. Tumors which are found to be bilateral on biopsy only but which are not palpable bilaterally should not be staged as T2c. Evaluation of the regional lymph nodes ('N') NX: cannot evaluate the regional lymph nodes • N0: there has been no spread to the regional lymph nodes • N1: there has been spread to the regional lymph nodes Evaluation of distant metastasis ('M') • MX: cannot evaluate distant metastasis • M0: there is no distant metastasis • M1: there is distant metastasis • M1a: the cancer has spread to lymph nodes beyond the regional ones • M1b: the cancer has spread to bone • M1c: the cancer has spread to other sites (regardless of bone involvement) Evaluation of the histologic grade ('G') Usually, the grade of the cancer (how different the tissue is from normal tissue) is evaluated separately from the stage; however, for prostate cancer, grade information is used in conjunction with TNM status to group cases into four overall stages. • GX: cannot assess grade • G1: the tumor closely resembles normal tissue (Gleason 2–4) • G2: the tumor somewhat resembles normal tissue (Gleason 5–6) • G3–4: the tumor resembles normal tissue barely or not at all (Gleason 7–10) Of note, this system of describing tumors as "well-", "moderately-", and "poorly-" differentiated based on Gleason score of 2-4, 5-6, and 7-10, respectively, persists in SEER and other databases but is generally outdated. In recent years pathologists rarely assign a tumor a grade less than 3, particularly in biopsy tissue. A more contemporary consideration of Gleason grade is: • Gleason 3+3: tumor is low grade (favorable prognosis) • Gleason 3+4 / 3+5: tumor is mostly low grade with some high grade • Gleason 4+3 / 5+3: tumor is mostly high grade with some low grade • Gleason 4+4 / 4+5 / 5+4 / 5+5: tumor is all high grade Note that under current guidelines, if any Pattern 5 is present it is included in final score, regardless of the percentage of the tissue having this pattern, as the presence of any pattern 5 is considered to be a poor prognostic marker. Overall staging The tumor, lymph node, metastasis, and grade status can be combined into four stages of worsening severity. Stage Tumor Nodes Metastasis Grade Stage I T1a N0 M0 G1 Stage II T1a N0 M0 G2–4 T1b N0 M0 Any G T1c N0 M0 Any G T1 N0 M0 Any G T2 N0 M0 Any G Stage III T3 N0 M0 Any G Stage IV T4 N0 M0 Any G Any T N1 M0 Any G Any T Any N M1 Any G Bladder T (Primary tumour) • TX Primary tumour cannot be assessed • T0 No evidence of primary tumour • Ta Non-invasive papillary carcinoma • Tis Carcinoma in situ (‘flat tumour’) • T1 Tumour invades subepithelial connective tissue • T2a Tumour invades superficial muscle (inner half) • T2b Tumour invades deep muscle (outer half) • T3 Tumour invades perivesical tissue: • T3a Microscopically • T3b Macroscopically (extravesical mass) • T4a Tumour invades prostate, uterus or vagina • T4b Tumour invades pelvic wall or abdominal wall N (Lymph nodes) • NX Regional lymph nodes cannot be assessed • N0 No regional lymph node metastasis • N1 Metastasis in a single lymph node 2 cm or less in greatest dimension • N2 Metastasis in a single lymph node more than 2 cm but not more than 5 cm in greatest dimension,or multiple lymph nodes, none more than 5 cm in greatest dimension • N3 Metastasis in a lymph node more than 5 cm in greatest dimension M (Distant metastasis) • MX Distant metastasis cannot be assessed • M0 No distant metastasis • M1 Distant metastasis. Grade Urothelial papilloma – non cancerous (benign) tumour •Papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP) – very slow growing and unlikely to spread •Low grade papillary urothelial carcinoma – slow growing and unlikely to spread •High grade papillary urothelial carcinoma – more quickly growing and more likely to spread  
Thomas Lemon
about 6 years ago
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Dealing with Personal Illness in Med School

Hey guys! I’m Nicole and I’m a second year medical student at Glasgow University. I’ve decided to start this blog to write about my experiences as a med student and the difficulties I encounter along the way, hopefully giving you something you can relate to. Since June of last year I have been suffering with a personal illness, with symptoms of persistent nausea, gastric pain and lethargy. At first I thought it was just a bug that would pass on fairly quickly, but as the summer months went on it was clear that this illness wasn’t going to disappear overnight. I spent my summer going through a copious amount of medications in hope that I’d feel better for term starting. I visited my GP several times and had bloods taken regularly. After 2 months, I finally got given a diagnosis; I had a helicobacter pylori infection. I started eradication therapy for a week and although it made my symptoms worse, I was positive would make me better and I’d be well again within the week. The week passed with no improvements in my condition. Frustrated, I went back to my GP who referred me for an endoscopy. Term started back the next week and despite feeling miserable I managed to drag myself out to every lecture, tutorial and lab. Within a few weeks I began to fall behind in my work, doing the bare minimum required to get through. Getting up each morning was a struggle and forcing myself to sit in lectures despite the severe nausea I was experiencing was becoming a bigger challenge each day. In October I went for my endoscopy which, for those of you that don't know, is a horribly uncomfortable procedure. My family and friends assured me that this would be the final stage and I’d be better very very soon. The results came back and my GP gave me a different PPI in hope that it would fix everything. I waited a few weeks and struggled through uni constantly hoping that everything would magically get better. I gave up almost all my extra-circular activities which for me, the extrovert I am, was possibly the hardest part of it all. I wanted to stay in bed all the time and I become more miserable every day. I was stressing about falling behind in uni and tensions began to build up in my personal life. It got to the point where I couldn’t eat a meal without it coming back up causing me to lose a substantial amount of weight. I got so stressed that I had to leave an exam to throw up. I was truly miserable. I seen a consultant just before Christmas who scheduled me in for some scans, but it wasn’t until January. I was frustrated at how long this was going on for and I thought it was about time I told the medical school about my situation. They were very understanding and I was slightly surprised at just how supportive they were. I contacted my head of year who arranged a visit with me for January. During the Christmas break I had a chance to relax and forget about everything that was stressing me. I got put on a stronger anti-sickness medication which, surprisingly, seemed to work. The tensions in my life that had built up in the last few months seemed to resolve themselves and I began to feel a lot more positive! I met with my head of year just last week who was encouraged by my newly found positive behaviour. We’ve agreed to see how things progress over the next few months, but things are looking a lot brighter than before. I’ve taken on a new attitude and I’m determined to work my hardest to get through this year. I’m currently undertaking an SSC so I have lots of free time to catch up on work I missed during the last term. My head of year has assured me that situations like the one I’m in happen all the time and I’m definitely not alone. I feel better knowing that the medical school are behind me and are willing to help and support me through this time. The most important thing I have taken from this experience is the fact that you’ll never know the full extent of what a patient is going through. Illness effects different people in different ways and it may not just be a persons health thats affected, it can affect all aspects of their life. This experience has definitely opened my eyes up and hopefully I’ll be able to understand patients’ situations a little better.  
Nicole Mooney
over 5 years ago
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The Importance Of Clinical Skills

In the USA the issue of indiscriminate use of expensive, sophisticated, and time consuming test in lieu of, rather than in addition to, the clinical exam is being much discussed. The cause of this problem is of course multifactorial. One of the factors is the decline of the teaching of clinical skills to our medical students and trainees. Such problems seem to have taken hold in developing countries as well. Two personal anecdotes will illustrate this. In the early nineties I worked for two years as a faculty member in the department of ob & gyn at the Aga Khan University Medical School in Karachi, Pakistan. One day, I received a call from the resident in the emergency room about a woman who had come in because of some abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding. While the resident told me these two symptoms her next sentence was: “… and the pelvic ultrasound showed…” I stopped her right in her tracks before she could tell me the result of the ultrasound scan. I told her: “First tell me more about this patient. Does she look ill? Is she bleeding heavily? Is she in a lot of pain and where is the pain? What are her blood pressure and pulse rate? How long has she been having these symptoms? When was her last menstrual period? What are your findings when you examined her ? What is the result of the pregnancy test?”. The resident could not answer most of these basic clinical questions and findings. She had proceeded straight to a test which might or might not have been necessary or even indicated and she was not using her clinical skills or judgment. In another example, the resident, also in Karachi, called me to the emergency room about a patient with a ruptured ectopic pregnancy. He told me that the patient was pale, and obviously bleeding inside her abdomen and on the verge of going into shock. The resident had accurately made the diagnosis, based on the patient’s history, examination, and a few basic laboratory tests. But when I ran down to see the patient, he was wheeling the patient into the radiology department for an ultrasound. "Why an ultrasound?" I asked. “You already have made the correct diagnosis and she needs an urgent operation not another diagnostic procedure that will take up precious time before we can stop the internal bleeding.” Instead of having the needless ultrasound, the patient was wheeled into the operating room. What I am trying to emphasize is that advances in technology are great but they need to be used judiciously and young medical students and trainees need to be taught to use their clinical skills first and then apply new technologies, if needed, to help them to come to the right diagnosis and treatment. And of course we, practicing physicians need to set the example. Or am I old fashioned and not with it? Medico legal and other issues may come to play here and I am fully aware of these. However the basic issue of clinical exam is still important. Those wanting to read more similar stories can download a free e book from Smashwords. The title is: "CROSSCULTURAL DOCTORING. ON AND OFF THE BEATEN PATH." You can access the e book here.  
DR William LeMaire
over 5 years ago
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Pleural Effusion Explained Clearly

Understand pleural effusions with this clear illustration by Dr. Roger Seheult. Includes discussion on causes, symptoms, pathophysiology, diagnosis (includin...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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3
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Pneumonia Explained Clearly | 2 of 3

Dr. Seheult continues his illustrations of pneumonia, highlighting the key differences in diagnosis and treatment between typical pneumonia and atypical pneu...  
youtube.com
about 4 years ago
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3
27

Lung cancer: diagnosis and management | Guidance and guidelines | NICE

This guideline will shortly be checked to see if it needs updating, please register as a stakeholder to be informed about the decision.  
nice.org.uk
almost 4 years ago
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3
21

Cases - Prognosis: Online

Browse our collection of 500+ interactive clinical cases across 30+ specialties.  
prognosisapp.com
over 3 years ago
5
2
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Focus On: Diagnosis of Pulmonary Embolism

With approximately 600,000 cases and 50,000 deaths per year, this condition challenges emergency physicians to be diligent in their patient evaluation and knowledgeable in their interpretation of nonspecific tests.  
American College Of Emergency Medicine
about 9 years ago
12
2
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Myocardial Infarction: Diagnosis and Thrombolytics

Myocardial Infaction (Part 1): This episode will discuss the diagnosis of MI, STEMI, and non-STEMI.  We then discuss the indications and types of thrombolytic agents.  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
about 9 years ago
12
2
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Diagnosis and Staging of Lung Cancer: A Pulmonologist's Perspective (Video)

This slide presentation by Dr. Gerard Silvestri, pulmonologist at Medical Univ. of South Carolina, covers the key methods of evaluating a new lung cancer, including initial diagnosis and staging studies.  
Howard (Jack) West, MD
about 9 years ago
4
2
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Bringing Adult-Onset ADHD Into Focus. Episode 3: Adult ADHD--How Should it Be Treated?

In this podcast series, comprised of three stand-alone episodes (also available as webcasts), Drs. Andrew Cutler and David Goodman discuss the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD in adults. Episode 3 focuses on treatment and management strategies for adults with ADHD.  
Neuroscience Education Institute
about 9 years ago
5
2
9

Bringing Adult-Onset ADHD Into Focus. Episode 2: Adult ADHD--How is it Diagnosed?

In this podcast series, comprised of three stand-alone episodes (also available as webcasts), Drs. Andrew Cutler and David Goodman discuss the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD in adults. Episode 2 addresses diagnostic controversies and recommendations regarding late-onset and late diagnosis of ADHD.  
Neuroscience Education Institute
about 9 years ago
6
2
6

Bringing Adult-Onset ADHD Into Focus. Episode 1: Adult ADHD--What Does it Look Like?

In this podcast series, comprised of three stand-alone episodes (also available as webcasts), Drs. Andrew Cutler and David Goodman discuss the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD in adults. Episode 1 focuses on the presentation of ADHD in adults and how it typically differs from that in children.  
Neuroscience Education Institute
about 9 years ago
9
2
12

ADHD Across the Ages: Diagnostic and Treatment Implications. Episode 1: Pediatric ADHD

In this podcast series, comprised of three stand-alone episodes (also available as webcasts), Drs. Andrew Cutler and Peter Jensen discuss the effect that age has on the clinical presentation of ADHD and what that means in terms of treatment selection and overall patient care. Episode 1 focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of ADHD in children.  
Neuroscience Education Institute
about 9 years ago
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2
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Delirium in the ICU

Delirium is a common problem in seriously patients in ICU and on the wards. This presentation looks at causes, diagnosis, and treatments.  
Andrew Ferguson
over 8 years ago