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Budesonide for treatment of people with active Crohn's disease. | Cochrane

What is Crohn's disease? Crohn's disease is a debilitating long-term (chronic) inflammatory bowel disease that can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract from mouth to anus. Symptoms include abdominal pain, non-bloody diarrhea and weight loss. The most common initial treatment of the Crohn's disease is oral steroid therapy. Unfortunately, traditional steroids are usually absorbed into the body and cause significant unwanted side effects. These may include but are not limited to weight gain, diabetes, growth retardation, acne, mood instability, and high blood pressure. When people with Crohn's disease are experiencing symptoms of the disease it is said to be ‘active’; periods when the symptoms stop are called ‘remission’.  
cochrane.org
over 6 years ago
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24

Effect of administration of antihelminthic for soil-transmitted helminths during pregnancy | Cochrane

Intestinal worms (helminths) contribute to iron-deficiency anaemia as they feed on blood and cause further bleeding by releasing anticoagulant compounds. They also affect the supply of nutrients and cause anorexia, vomiting and diarrhoea. Pregnancy complicated by maternal hookworm infection poses a serious threat to the health of mothers and their babies, especially in developing countries. Women who are anaemic during pregnancy are more likely to have ill health, give birth prematurely, and have low birthweight babies with low iron reserves. Antihelminthic drugs are highly effective and have minimal side-effects but information on their use during pregnancy is limited. The major concern is that the drugs may cause malformation of the fetus (teratogenic effects). We examined the research published up to 31 January 2015 on the impact of giving a single antihelminthic treatment in the second trimester of pregnancy on maternal anaemia and pregnancy outcomes.  
cochrane.org
over 6 years ago
Www.bmj
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An elderly woman with postprandial abdominal pain

An 84 year old woman presented with a five month history of central, recurrent, severe epigastric pain, which occurred about 20 minutes after eating. This was associated with nausea, occasional diarrhoea, and vomiting. She had experienced early satiety and weight loss over the last few months. Her medical history included myocardial infarction two years earlier. She also had a 40 pack year history of smoking. On examination, she was cachectic, but physical examination and digital rectal examination were otherwise unremarkable. Blood tests—including full blood count, liver functions tests, amylase, and renal function—were normal. Chest and abdominal radiographs, abdominal ultrasound, and computed tomography of the abdomen were unremarkable. Computed tomography angiography was performed (fig 1⇓).  
feeds.bmj.com
over 6 years ago