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E. Coli Mind Map

A mind map for E. coli emphasizing virulence factors and the diseases it causes.  
Ryan Matthews
over 6 years ago
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Pathogen Table

Pathogen Disease Caused/Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment F U N G I Filamentous Fungi Microsporum Canis, Trichophyton Rubum, Epidermophyton Floccosum Infects kerati…  
Lizzie Sykes
over 6 years ago
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Iron Profile TIBC, Ferritin and Saturation

My notes on iron metabolism and diagnosis of diseases using iron profile.  
Sarosh Kamal
over 4 years ago
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1001

Short guide to respiratory medicine

Short guide detailing diseases of the respiratory system.  
John Ferns
almost 8 years ago
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Diseases of Blood Vessels

My hand-drawn diagrams of the diseases of the blood vessels.  
nedaa kiwan
over 5 years ago
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Liver Diseases Explained Clearly

Understand liver diseases related to the gall bladder (cholestatic diseases) with this brief and clear explanation from Dr. Roger Seheult.  
YouTube
over 6 years ago
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Diseases of the breast

simplified drawing for the pathology of the breast  
nedaa kiwan
over 5 years ago
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Cystic fibrosis

This podcast tutorial on cystic fibrosis gives an overview of the disease including presentation and diagnosis.  
Mr Raymond Buick
about 12 years ago
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My hand drawn diagram for bone diseases

I love this one , hope you love it too  
nedaa kiwan
about 5 years ago
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Respiratory disease symptoms

This document lists the symptoms of all the respiratory disease I came across in the rspiratory module in my first year of medical school.  
Lucy Faulkner
over 8 years ago
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Live Surgery! Clinical Utilisation Of Fractional Flow Reserve In Multi-Vessel Disease

Live Case from the Hammersmith Hospital, UK - Clinical Utilisation Of Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR) In Multi-Vessel Disease (MVD). By Radcliffe Cardiology.  
youtube.com
over 5 years ago
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Mneumonics/Acronyms for Population Health and Evidence-Based Practice

Some easy methods to remember: - the definition of 'Epidemiology' and 'Public Health'. - what are Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary disease prevention. - the Bradford-Hill criteria for disease causation.  
David Jones
almost 9 years ago
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Respiratory diseases 2

 
nedaa kiwan
over 5 years ago
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Master Radiologist Able to Hedge on Every Possible Medical Condition | GomerBlog

A radiologist is able to mention every disease in his CT exam.  
gomerblog.com
about 5 years ago
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347

Vagus nerve

An edited version of my Friday Evening Discouse given to the Royal Institution on 11 April 2008. Abstract: The vagus nerves (cranial nerve X) connects our brainstem to the body, facilitating monitoring and control of many automatic functions; the vagus electrically links our gut, lungs and heart to the base of the brain in an evolutionarily-ancient circuit, similar between mammals and also seen in birds, reptiles, and amphibians. The vagus comprises a major part of the parasympathetic autonomic nervous system, contributing to the motor control of important physiological functions such as heart rate and gut motility. The vagus is also sensory, relaying protective visceral information leading to reflexes like cough and indication of lung volume. The vagus has been described as a neural component of the immune reflex. By monitoring changes in the level of control exerted by the vagus, apparent as beat by beat changes of heart rate, it is possible to indirectly view the effect of pharmaceuticals and disease on brainstem function and neural processes underlying consciousness. The paired vagus nerves of humans have different functions, and stimulation of the left vagus has been shown to be a therapeutic treatment for epilepsy, and may modulate the perception of pain.  
Chris Pomfrett
almost 12 years ago
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Respiratory diseases 1

 
nedaa kiwan
over 5 years ago
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Ebola Virus Disease - MOA Animation - Scientific Animations

We all hear about Ebola being a deadly disease, and indeed it is. The rather agressive virus has already claimed about 10,000 lives. But what really makes Ebola such a deadly virus? Let’s try and understand how Ebola really attacks the cells within the body which in turn leads to multiple organ failure and then exigency. This 3D Medical Animation illustrates the Mechanism of Action of the Ebola Virus.  
scientificanimations.com
about 5 years ago
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The Medical Book Warzone... Which book is best?

As the days are slowly getting longer, and spring looms in the near future, it can only be the deep inhale of the medical student ready to embrace the months of revision that lies ahead. Books are dusted off the shelves and Gray's anatomy wrenched open with an immense sigh of distain. But which book should we be pulling off the shelves? If you're anything like me then you're a medical book hoarder. Now let me "Google define" this geeky lexis lingo - a person who collects medical books (lots of medical books) and believes by having the book they will automatically do better!... I wish with a deep sigh! So when I do actually open the page of one, as they are usually thrown across the bed-room floor always closed, it is important to know which one really is the best to choose?!? These are all the crazy thoughts of the medical book hoarder, however, there is some sanity amongst the madness. That is to say, when you find a really good medical book and get into the topic you start to learn stuff thick and fast, and before you know it you’ll be drawing out neuronal pathways and cardiac myocyte action potentials. Yet, the trick is not picking up the shiniest and most expensive book, oh no, otherwise we would all be walking around with the 130 something pounds gray’s anatomy atlas. The trick is to pick a book that speaks to you, and one in which you can get your head around – It’s as if the books each have their own personality. Here are a list of books that I would highly recommend: Tortora – Principles of anatomy and physiology Tortora is a fantastic book for year 1 medical students, it is the only book I found that truly bridges the gap between A levels and medical students without going off on a ridiculous and confusing tangent. While it lacks subtle detail, it is impressive in how simplified it can make topics appear, and really helps build a foundation to anatomy and physiology knowledge The whole book is easy to follow and numerous pretty pictures and diagrams, which make learning a whole lot easier. Tortora scores a whopping 8/10 by the medical book hoarder Sherwood – From cells to systems Sherwood is the marmite of the medical book field, you either love this book or your hate it. For me, Sherwood used to be my bible in year two. It goes into intricate physiological detail in every area of the body. It has great explanations and really pushes your learning to a greater level than tortora in year one. The book doesn’t just regurgitate facts it really explores concepts. However: I cannot be bias, and I must say that I know a number of people who hate this book in every sense of the word. A lot of people think there is too much block text without distractions such as pictures or tables. They think the text is very waffly, not getting straight to the point and sometimes discusses very advanced concepts that do not appear relevant The truth be told, if you want to study from Sherwood you need to a very good attention span and be prepared to put in the long-hours of work so it’s not for everyone. Nonetheless, if you manage to put the effort in, you will reap the rewards! Sherwood scores a fair 5-6/10 by the medical book hoarder Moore & Dalley – Clinical anatomy At first glance Moore & Dalley can be an absolute mindfield with an array of pastel colours that all amalgamate into one! It’s also full of table after table of muscle and blood vessels with complicated diagrams mixed throughout. This is not a medical book for the faint hearted, and if your foundation of anatomy is a little shakey you’ll fall further down the rabbit hole than Alice ever did. That being said, for those who have mastered the simplistic anatomy of tortora and spent hours pondering anatomy flash cards, this may be the book for you. Moore & Dalley does not skimp on the detail and thus if you’re willing to learn the ins and out of the muscles of the neck then look no further. Its sections are actually broken down nicely into superficial and deep structures and then into muscles, vessels, nerves and lymph, with big sections on organs. This is a book for any budding surgeon! Moore & Dalley scores a 6/10 by the medical book hoarder Macleod’s clinical examination Clinical examination is something that involves practical skills and seeing patients, using your hands to manipulate the body in ways you never realised you could. Many people will argue that the day of the examination book is over, and it’s all about learning while on the job and leaving the theory on the book shelf. I would like to oppose this theory, with claims that a little understanding of theory can hugely improve your clinical practice. Macleod’s takes you through basic history and examination skills within each of the main specialties, discussing examination sequences and giving detailed explanations surrounding examination findings. It is a book that you can truly relate to what you have seen or what you will see on the wards. My personal opinion is that preparation is the key, and macleod’s is the ultimate book to give you that added confidence become you tackle clinical medicine on the wards Macleod’s clinical examination scores a 7/10 by the medical book hoarder Oxford textbook of clinical pathology When it comes to learning pathology there are a whole host of medical books on the market from underwood to robbins. Each book has its own price range and delves into varying degrees of complexity. Robbins is expensive and a complex of mix of cellular biology and pathophysiological mechanisms. Underwood is cheap, but lacking in certain areas and quite difficult to understand certain topics. The Oxford textbook of clinical pathology trumps them all. The book is fantastic for any second year or third year attempting to learn pathology and classify disease. It is the only book that I have found that neatly categories diseases in a way in which you can follow, helping you to understand complications of certain diseases, while providing you with an insight into pathology. After reading this book you’ll be sure to be able to classify all the glomerulonephritis’s while having at least some hang of the pink and purples of the histological slide. Oxford textbook of clinical pathology scores a 8/10 by the medical book hoarder Medical Pharmacology at glance Pharmacology is the arch nemesis of the Peninsula student (well maybe if we discount anatomy!!), hours of time is spent avoiding the topic followed immediately by hours of complaining we are never taught any of it. Truth be told, we are taught pharmacology, it just comes in drips and drabs. By the time we’ve learnt the whole of the clotting cascade and the intrinsic mechanisms of the P450 pathway, were back on to ICE’ing the hell out of patients and forget what we learned in less than a day. Medical pharmacology at a glance however, is the saviour of the day. I am not usually a fan of the at a glance books. I find that they are just a book of facts in a completely random order that don’t really help unless you’re an expert in the subject. The pharmacology version is different: It goes into just the right amount of detail without throwing you off the cliff with discussion about bioavailability and complex half-life curves relating to titration and renal function. This book has the essential drugs, it has the essential facts, and it is the essential length, meaning you don’t have to spend ours reading just to learn a few facts! In my opinion, this is one of those books that deserves the mantel piece! Medical Pharmacology at a glance scores a whopping 9/10 by the medical book hoarder. Anatomy colouring book This is the last book in our discussion, but by far the greatest. After the passing comments about this book by my housemates, limited to the sluggish boy description of “it’s terrible” or “its S**t”, I feel I need to hold my own and defend this books corner. If your description of a good book is one which is engaging, interesting, fun, interaction, and actually useful to your medical learning then this book has it all. While it may be a colouring book and allows your autistic side to run wild, the book actually covers a lot of in depth anatomy with some superb pictures that would rival any of the big anatomical textbooks. There is knowledge I have gained from this book that I still reel off during the question time onslaught of surgery. Without a doubt my one piece of advice to all 1st and 2nd years would be BUY THIS BOOK and you will not regret it! Anatomy colouring book scores a tremendous 10/10 by the medical book hoarder Let the inner GEEK run free and get buying:)!!  
Benjamin Norton
over 7 years ago
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MLF syndrome - Internuclear Ophthalmoplegia, MADE EASY

Website: http://www.medical-institution.com/ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/Medicalinstitution Twitter: https://twitter.com/USMLE_HighYield  
MRCP Videos
over 6 years ago