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2
33

Anatomy of Middle Ear 8/9

Visit http://www.DrNajeebLectures.com for 600+ videos on Basic Medical Sciences!  
youtube.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
0
15

An unusual finding on a pelvic radiograph

A 74 year old man presented to the ear, nose, and throat department with breathlessness on exertion, intermittent voice hoarseness, and a sensation of catarrh in his throat. After a laryngoscopy with biopsy was performed, he was diagnosed as having a low grade chondrosarcoma of the larynx. Before surgical debulking of the lesion was carried out he underwent computed tomography of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. This confirmed the presence of a subglottic mass in the larynx but also showed a mixed lytic and sclerotic expansile lesion (5.8 cm (longitudinal)×1.6 cm (axial)×4.5 cm) in the left iliac blade of the pelvis. The pelvic lesion was well corticated, with internal ossified septae and calcification. Expansion of the left iliac wing was noted, with no breach in the cortex.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
20

An unusual finding on a pelvic radiograph

A 74 year old man presented to the ear, nose, and throat department with breathlessness on exertion, intermittent voice hoarseness, and a sensation of catarrh in his throat. After a laryngoscopy with biopsy was performed, he was diagnosed as having a low grade chondrosarcoma of the larynx. Before surgical debulking of the lesion was carried out he underwent computed tomography of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. This confirmed the presence of a subglottic mass in the larynx but also showed a mixed lytic and sclerotic expansile lesion (5.8 cm (longitudinal)×1.6 cm (axial)×4.5 cm) in the left iliac blade of the pelvis. The pelvic lesion was well corticated, with internal ossified septae and calcification. Expansion of the left iliac wing was noted, with no breach in the cortex.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
42

A&P Biol 227: Anatomy of the Ear

A fantastical adventure through the winding roads and convoluted canals of the ear.  
YouTube
almost 6 years ago
8
1
32

Resources

RESOURCES: Here are some useful presentations to download / see prior to your Oncology attachment. They are also good revision tools; plus there are prizes to be won!! Prizes to be won: Steven Carstairs Research Prize and Edinburgh EAR Congress Research Prize are offered through the Royal College of Radiologists. This year's closing date has…  
Cancer Dundee Blog
almost 6 years ago
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2
35

otoscopy.php

NB in textbooks and on this website, images of the ear are usually taken with an endoscope which has a wide angle lens on the end. This gives us an image which contains the whole tympanic membrane and much of the ear canal. When using an otoscope, you will NEVER get a view as good as this, not because it is your fault, but because of the optics of most endoscopes. It is unlikely that you will in fact be able to see the whole drum in one position. To see all aspects of the drum you will need to change position and move the tip of the otoscope.  
entbristol.co.uk
about 6 years ago
Preview
6
155

Auditory Transduction (2002)

This 7-minute video by Brandon Pletsch takes viewers on a step-by-step voyage through the inside of the ear, to the acoustic accompaniment of classical music...  
YouTube
over 6 years ago
Preview
2
106

A&P Biol 227: Anatomy of the Ear

A fantastical adventure through the winding roads and convoluted canals of the ear.  
YouTube
over 6 years ago
Preview
1
32

Cochlear implants for children and adults with severe to profound deafness | 2-Clinical-need-and-practice | Guidance and guidelines | NICE

2.1 Hearing loss may be caused by interference with the transmission of sound from the outer to the inner ear (conductive hearing loss) or damage within the cochlea, the auditory nerve or auditory centres in the brain (sensorineural hearing loss). In adults the most common cause of sensorineural hearing loss is presbycusis. This is a progressive condition caused by the loss of function of hair cells in the inner ear, leading to deafness. Hearing loss in adults may also be caused by excessive exposure to noise, or by ototoxic drugs, metabolic disorders, infections or genetic factors. Severe to profound hearing loss in children may have a genetic aetiology, or have prenatal, perinatal or postnatal causes. These include conditions such as meningitis and viral infection of the inner ear (for example, rubella or measles), as well as premature birth and congenital infections. Deafness that occurs before the development of language is described as prelingual, whereas deafness that occurs after the development of language is described as postlingual.  
publications.nice.org.uk
over 6 years ago
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1
59

A 68 year old woman with deteriorating hearing

A 68 year old woman presented to the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) clinic with gradually worsening bilateral hearing loss over at least the past five years. This was associated with some non-intrusive tinnitus but no other otological symptoms, history of vertigo, or associated systemic problems. She found that she was increasing the TV volume to a level that her family found uncomfortable, and she had started to avoid social situations because she struggled to hear conversation among the background noise. Her medical history was unremarkable except for well controlled hypertension, for which she was taking amlodipine. She also had no history of excessive noise exposure, no previous otological problems, and no family history of note.  
bmj.com
over 6 years ago
1
1
20

WHO | Many countries lack capacity to prevent and treat hearing loss

Many of the countries who responded to a new WHO survey lack the capacity to prevent and care for hearing loss, according to a report published on International Ear Care Day, 3 March.  
who.int
over 6 years ago
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1
29

A 68 year old woman with deteriorating hearing

A 68 year old woman presented to the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) clinic with gradually worsening bilateral hearing loss over at least the past five years. This was associated with some non-intrusive tinnitus but no other otological symptoms, history of vertigo, or associated systemic problems. She found that she was increasing the TV volume to a level that her family found uncomfortable, and she had started to avoid social situations because she struggled to hear conversation among the background noise. Her medical history was unremarkable except for well controlled hypertension, for which she was taking amlodipine. She also had no history of excessive noise exposure, no previous otological problems, and no family history of note.  
bmj.com
over 6 years ago
Static.www.bmj
1
36

Hoarseness in a 79 year old woman

A 79 year old woman was referred to our ear, nose, and throat outpatient clinic with a history of hoarse voice. This symptom had been present for around three months. It initially fluctuated in severity but eventually became constant. There was no associated pain, weight loss, cough, dysphagia, odynophagia, or other upper airway symptoms. She had not recently had surgery or experienced trauma. Her medical history was of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and she was an ex-smoker.  
bmj.com
over 6 years ago
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8
269

Ear Organ of Corti

An animation of the organ in the inner ear of mammals that contain auditory inner and outer haircells.  
YouTube
over 6 years ago
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26
1905

Ear Anatomy & Physiology

Ms. Klemme discusses basic ear anatomy and an introduction to the hearing pathway.  
YouTube
over 6 years ago
Preview
1
31

Upper Respiratory Tract Infections

Upper Respiratory Tract Infections These account for up to 80% of all RTI’s in children. They can involve the ears, nose, throat and sinuses. They are rarely serious and will not often require hospitalisation. They can become an issue when: A very young child has an RTI that causes a severely ‘blocked nose’ as this can affect feeding. This may result in hospitalisation. There are associated febrile convulsions The RTI causes an exacerbation of asthma  
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 3cqojv?1444774240
3
98

Goodbye fear and ego, hello better patient care

The best doctors in the world still have bad consultation. Sometimes you just start off on the wrong foot. The patient leaving in a floor of tears is usually an indication that this has just occurred. On one of my medical placements I witnessed one such consultation. A young woman in the early stages of her pregnancy had a per vaginal bleed and wanted a scan to see if the pregnancy was still ok. Medically speaking, a scan wasn’t indicated as the pregnancy was too early on to detect any changes. The doctors noted the “agenda” as they later remarked, and was not going to “play the game” and send the young woman for a scan. She was not happy about this. The doctor felt that he couldn’t have done more. Medically there was nothing he could offer to the woman other than advice to go home and wait a little while before repeating a pregnancy test. To me, there was lots that could have been done. This woman was scared and worried and a sympathetic ear and a tissue would have gone some way to making her feel better. The doctor I was with couldn’t see this. They were blind sighted by the repeated requests for a scan and slightly frustrated that the unhelpfulness of this was not being understood. When the young woman began to cry I was waiting for the doctor to hand over a tissue. “Any second now...” I thought, but it never happened. I wanted to give the woman a tissue and put my arm around her but that would have meant physically placing myself between the doctor and the patients and interrupting a consultation I wasn’t really a part of. But the truth is. I was a part of that consultation. I might not have been the doctor in charge but I was another person in that room who could have made that situation easier for that patient and I didn’t. Hours later, on my way home, I was still thinking about this. I felt I had let that woman down. I could see what she needed and I sat there and did nothing. After the consultation I immediately told the doctor what I thought. I felt that the patient had been let down. They took on what I said and mostly agreed with it. All egos were put aside in that frank conversation and the doctor genuinely reflected on how they could have done better in that situation. It wasn’t about me or the doctor. It was about the patient. As a medical student it is easy to feel in the way in the hospital environment or in a busy clinic. When the consultant is running behind, it takes a lot to ask the patients something or butt in and add something you think is relevant that in the end may turn out to be a very trivial thing. But at the end of the day, it is worth it if it means that there is a better out come for the patient because when all is said and done they are the ones we are doing this all for. I regret not handing that patient a tissue and it’s a mistake I hope never to repeat again.  
Salma Aslam
over 6 years ago
Preview
8
172

Anatomy of the Ear and Physiology of Hearing

A walk-through of ear anatomy using an illustrated diagram.  
Nicole Chalmers
over 6 years ago
Preview
7
154

Ear Anatomy

The outer, middle and inner ear. The structures that are present, hope you like it!! Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan IMAGE: https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B8Ss3-wJfHrpcER1Q2lpX2g0WGs  
Nicole Chalmers
over 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 3mtc8f?1444774190
2
114

A Tale of Guilt and Woe

A Tale of Guilt and Woe June 2012. It was unseasonably miserable. Having successfully fought the battle of Neuro I was all ready for the next onslaught which manifested itself in the form of reproductive and endocrine medicine (us Bristolians have dubbed it EndoRepro which sounds more like an evil Mexican villain). I was making a trip to the library, which, at the time, was around a 30-minute walk away from my student house. This was to do some extra reading. I had my laptop in my bag along with my bags of Haribo for encouragement and when I’d stomached all I could take I began the walk back. It rained. It rained like I have never seen rain before. For 30 minutes, I walked in a torrential down pour and when I arrived at the local Sainsbury’s, they kicked me out because I was dripping that much I posed a health and safety risk on their tiled floor. It was a very miserable day. When I had eventually gotten back into my room and put all my clothes to dry I stood there and thought – why. Why was I doing this to myself? It wasn’t even necessary and I’d put myself through a monsoon to go get some books and read ahead. The reason was because I’d have felt guilty if I hadn’t – I planned to do it, so I was doing it. Guilt is a very powerful thing and it’s something we all encounter as students on a regular basis. When I used to revise for my pre-clinical exams, if I stopped for an hour or two that meant I would have to extend my evening revision to cover the time. I should imagine everyone can relate to this (even those macho folk that profess to be invincible!). Stopping was not an option. In that rain-sodden day I learnt one thing – cut yourself some slack. I never believed it when people used to say to me that “down time” was as important as work time. Down time was wasted time. Down time was a period when I missed that all-important sentence that answered MCQ Q22 on the upcoming exam. At the start of that unit I decided to take things differently. I always timetabled work, but this time I was only doing those timetabled slots if I thought it would be productive. If not, the time was better spent doing other things. If I started and felt like it was too much effort, I didn’t carry on in some marathon-like endurance exercise, I stopped. I refused to let the guilt set in. I turned my ears off to all of the talk in lectures about how much work everyone had or hadn’t done – I refused to let myself be intimidated. So what was the result? I had much better sleep in that time. My head was a lot clearer and I found it about 100 times easier to get up for lectures in the morning. I spent a lot more time doing the things I enjoy which generally upped my motivation. More to the point, I achieved the best set of results in two years in those exams. I only wish I could go back to my fresher self and say: “Cut yourself some slack. Don’t feel guilty. Do your own thing”.  
Lucas Brammar
over 6 years ago