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Www.bmj
1
20

An unusual finding on a pelvic radiograph

A 74 year old man presented to the ear, nose, and throat department with breathlessness on exertion, intermittent voice hoarseness, and a sensation of catarrh in his throat. After a laryngoscopy with biopsy was performed, he was diagnosed as having a low grade chondrosarcoma of the larynx. Before surgical debulking of the lesion was carried out he underwent computed tomography of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. This confirmed the presence of a subglottic mass in the larynx but also showed a mixed lytic and sclerotic expansile lesion (5.8 cm (longitudinal)×1.6 cm (axial)×4.5 cm) in the left iliac blade of the pelvis. The pelvic lesion was well corticated, with internal ossified septae and calcification. Expansion of the left iliac wing was noted, with no breach in the cortex.  
bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
11
0
32

Why does acute otitis media cause ear drum perforation, whereas otitis media with effusion doesn't?

The textbooks say there is no perforation in OME, but why? If there is fluid build-up then surely there is a risk of perforation?  
Carly Bisset
about 7 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 gc6z71?1444774005
7
222

Worst Medical Experience Ever

Worst experience ever? - this is pretty difficult as I've worked in some of the poorest countries in the world and seen some things that should never happen like children dying of dehydration and malaria. But this recent experience was definitely the worst. It was midnight and I was trying to get my 16 month old to sleep having woken up after vomiting in his cot. Despite paracetamol, ibuprofen, stripping to nappy, damp sponging and having the window open he went rigid and started fitting. It only lasted a minute or two yet felt like an eternity as he was unable to breathe and became progressively blue as my mind raced ahead to brain damage or some other horrible sequalae. The fitting stopped and my mind turned to whether I was going to have to start CPR. I lay him on the floor and put my ear to his chest and was glad to hear a strong heartbeat but he was floppy with a compromised airway so I quickly got him in the recovery position. The ambulance arrived in 8 minutes and after some oxygen and some observations he was strapped in and ready to go. He had been unconscious for about 15 minutes but was starting to come round, much to my relief. The ambulance crew were great and their quick response made all the difference but then they took nearly half an hour to get to A&E in the middle of the night because they took the most awkward route imaginable. I don't know if it was a deliberate delaying tactic or just a lack of local knowledge but even without a blue light I could have done it in half the time! Why do ambulances not have GPS - ideally with local traffic info built in? We arrived in A&E and were ushered to a miserable receptionist who took our details and told us to have a seat. I noticed above her head that the wait time was 3.5 hours, though we did see a junior nurse who took his observations again. Not long after the screen changed to a 5 hour wait and a bit later to a 6 hour wait! I am glad to say that by about 3 hours my little man was back to his usual self (as evidenced by his attempts at destroying the department) and so after getting the nurse to repeat his obs (all normal) we decided to take him home, knowing we had a few more hours to wait for the doctor, and that the doctor was now unlikely to do anything as he was now well. I tell the story in such detail in part for catharsis, in part to share my brief insight into being on the other side of the consultation, but also because it illustrated a number of system failures. It was a horrible experience but made a lot worse by those system failures. And I couldn't help but feel even more sorry for those around me who didn't have the medical experience that I had to contextualise it all. Sickness, in ourselves or our loved ones, is bad enough without the system making it worse. I had 3 hours of walking around the department with my son in my arms which gave me plenty of time to observe what was going on around me and consider whether it could be improved. I did of course not have access to all areas and so couldn't see what was happening behind the scenes so things may have been busier than I was aware of. Also it was only one evening so not necessarily representative. There were about 15 children in the department and for the 3 hours we were there only a handful of new patients that arrived so no obvious reason for the increasing delay. As I walked around it was clear to me that at least half of the children didn't need to be there. Some were fast asleep on the benches, arguably suggesting they didn't need emergency treatment. One lad had a minor head injury that just needed a clean and some advice. Whilst I didn't ask anyone what was wrong with people talk and so you hear what some of the problems were. Some were definately far more appropriate for general practice. So how could things have been improved and could technology have helped as well? One thing that struck me is that the 'triage' nurse would have been much better as a senior doctor. Not necessarily a consultant but certainly someone with the experience to make decisions. Had this been the case I think a good number could have been sent home very quickly, maybe with some basic treatment or maybe just with advice. Even if it was more complex it may have been that an urgent outpatient in a few days time would have been a much more satisfactory way of dealing with the problem. Even in our case where immediate discharge wouldn't have been appropriate a senior doctor could have made a quick assessment and said "let's observe him for a couple of hours and then repeat is obs - if he is well, the obs are normal and you are happy then you can go home". This would have made the world of difference to us. So where does the technology come in? I've already mentioned Sat Nav for the ambulance but there are a number of other points where technology could have played a part in improving patient experience. Starting with the ambulance if they had access to real time data on hospital A&E waiting times they may have been able to divert us to a hospital with a much shorter time. This is even more important for adult hospitals were the turnover of patients is much higher. Such information could help staff and patients make more informed decisions. The ambulance took us to hospital which was probably appropriate for us but not for everyone. Unfortunately many of the other services like GP out of hours are not always prepared to accept such patients and again the ambulance crews need to know where is available and what access and waiting times they have. Walk-in patients are often also totally inappropriate and an easy method of redirection would be beneficial for all concerned. But this requires change and may even require such radical ideas as paying for transport to take patients to alternative locations if they are more appropraite. The reasons patient's choose A&E when other services would be far more appropriate are many and complex. It can be about transport and convenience and past experiences and many other things. It is likely that at least some of it is that patients often struggle to get an appointment to see their own GP within a reasonable time frame or just that their impression is that it will be difficult to get an appointment so they don't even try. But imagine a system where the waiting times for appointments for all GPs and out of hours services were readily available to hospitals, ambulances, NHS direct etc. Even better imagine that authorised people could book appointments directly, even when the practice was closed. How many patients would be happy to avoid a long wait in A&E if they had the reassurance of a GP appointment the next day? And the technology already exists to do some of this and it wouldn't be that hard to adapt current technology to provide this functionality. Yet it still doesn't happen. I have my theories as to why but this is enough for one post. In case you were wondering my son appears to have made a full recovery with no obvious ongoing problems. I think I have recovered and then he makes the same breathing noises he made just before the fit and I am transported back to that fateful night. I think it will take time for the feelings to fade.  
Dr Damian Williams
almost 7 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 2pctvh?1444774153
7
97

Pearls of Wisdom

If I had a penny, okay a pound, for every time a patient responded to the request to practice examining them said, 'Well, we all gotta learn', I would be a very rich medical student. (I'd like to add that this is said in a strong West-country accent, just so that you feel like you're really there.) I'm sure that the majority of my colleagues would agree. Today has been no different except for the fact that one of the patients I met described themselves as a 'whistleblower'. It was like my subconscious slapping me around the face and telling me to stop procrastinating. Why, you ask? Well I'm starting to get a little nervous actually, in exactly two weeks I'll be presenting my thoughts on whistleblowing (you might remember me going on about this during dissertation season) to a load of academics and healthcare professionals. My sphincters loosen up at the thought of it* Within five minutes of meeting this patient, they had imparted their wise words on me 'Chantal, just remember when you become a doctor - if you're absolutely sure that you're right about something then never be afraid to speak up about it.' Like music to my ears. Well, until he told me that he was convinced that 'cannabis cures all ills.' Each to their own. *I sincerely apologise, poor medic joke. Yuck. Written by Chantal Cox-George, 3rd Year Med Student at University of Bristol  
Chantal Cox-George
about 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 ud040l?1444774156
2
457

I hate being on-call - I’m just not good at sleeping on the job

BOXING Day, 1.30am. “Are you the doctor on call?” I wrenched my reluctant brain from its REM state. “Yes.” “I’m worried about my wife. She’s 16 weeks pregnant and very gassy.” “Gassy?” “Burping and farting. Smells terrible! It’s keeping us both awake. I’m worried it could be serious.” By the time I ascertained that there were no sinister symptoms and that the likely culprit was the custard served with Christmas pudding (the patient was lactose intolerant), I was wide awake. My brain refused to power down for hours, as if out of spite for being so rudely aroused. I have a confession to make. When the Australian Federal Government announced that it was planning to abolish after-hours practice incentive payments, I was delighted. I know, I know, I should have been outraged along with the rest of you. After all, the RACGP predicted that after-hours care would be decimated if incentives were removed. Comparisons were made with the revamp of the UK system in 2004, which led to 90% of the profession opting out of after-hours work. Much as I sympathised, I was secretly rubbing my hands together with selfish glee. Surely this would mean that our semi-rural practice would stop doing all of our own on-call and free me from my after-hours responsibilities? I detest being on call. I loathe it with a passion completely out of proportion to the imposition it actually causes. I’m on call for the practice and our local hospital only once a week and the workload isn’t onerous. Middle-of-the-night calls aren’t all that frequent, but my sleep can be disturbed by their mere possibility, leaving me tired and cranky. If I’m forced suddenly into “brain on, work mode” by a phone call, I can kiss hours of precious slumber goodbye. I love to sleep, but, as with drawing and tennis, I’m not very good at it. I gaze with envy at those lucky devils who nap on public transport and fight malicious urges to disturb their peaceful repose. If I’m not supine, in a quiet, warm room, with loose-fitting clothing, a firm mattress and a pillow shaped just-so, I can forget any chance of sleep. Let’s just say I can relate to the Princess and the Pea story. I bet she wouldn’t have coped well with being phoned in the middle of the night either. If these nocturnal calls were all bona fide emergencies, I wouldn’t mind so much. It’s the crap that really riles me. I’ve received middle-of-the-night phone calls from patients who are constipated, patients with impacted cerumen (“Me ear’s blocked, Doc. I can’t sleep”) and patients with insomnia who want to know if it’s safe to take a second sedative. The call that took the on-call cake for me, though, was from a couple who woke me at 11.30 one night to settle an argument. “My husband says that bacteria are more dangerous than viruses but I reckon viruses are worse. After all, AIDS is a virus. Can you settle it for us so we can get some sleep? It would really help us out.” I kid you not. Genevieve Yates is an Australian GP, medical educator, medico-legal presenter and writer. You can read more of her work at http://genevieveyates.com  
Dr Genevieve Yates
about 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 3mtc8f?1444774190
2
108

A Tale of Guilt and Woe

A Tale of Guilt and Woe June 2012. It was unseasonably miserable. Having successfully fought the battle of Neuro I was all ready for the next onslaught which manifested itself in the form of reproductive and endocrine medicine (us Bristolians have dubbed it EndoRepro which sounds more like an evil Mexican villain). I was making a trip to the library, which, at the time, was around a 30-minute walk away from my student house. This was to do some extra reading. I had my laptop in my bag along with my bags of Haribo for encouragement and when I’d stomached all I could take I began the walk back. It rained. It rained like I have never seen rain before. For 30 minutes, I walked in a torrential down pour and when I arrived at the local Sainsbury’s, they kicked me out because I was dripping that much I posed a health and safety risk on their tiled floor. It was a very miserable day. When I had eventually gotten back into my room and put all my clothes to dry I stood there and thought – why. Why was I doing this to myself? It wasn’t even necessary and I’d put myself through a monsoon to go get some books and read ahead. The reason was because I’d have felt guilty if I hadn’t – I planned to do it, so I was doing it. Guilt is a very powerful thing and it’s something we all encounter as students on a regular basis. When I used to revise for my pre-clinical exams, if I stopped for an hour or two that meant I would have to extend my evening revision to cover the time. I should imagine everyone can relate to this (even those macho folk that profess to be invincible!). Stopping was not an option. In that rain-sodden day I learnt one thing – cut yourself some slack. I never believed it when people used to say to me that “down time” was as important as work time. Down time was wasted time. Down time was a period when I missed that all-important sentence that answered MCQ Q22 on the upcoming exam. At the start of that unit I decided to take things differently. I always timetabled work, but this time I was only doing those timetabled slots if I thought it would be productive. If not, the time was better spent doing other things. If I started and felt like it was too much effort, I didn’t carry on in some marathon-like endurance exercise, I stopped. I refused to let the guilt set in. I turned my ears off to all of the talk in lectures about how much work everyone had or hadn’t done – I refused to let myself be intimidated. So what was the result? I had much better sleep in that time. My head was a lot clearer and I found it about 100 times easier to get up for lectures in the morning. I spent a lot more time doing the things I enjoy which generally upped my motivation. More to the point, I achieved the best set of results in two years in those exams. I only wish I could go back to my fresher self and say: “Cut yourself some slack. Don’t feel guilty. Do your own thing”.  
Lucas Brammar
almost 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 3cqojv?1444774240
3
98

Goodbye fear and ego, hello better patient care

The best doctors in the world still have bad consultation. Sometimes you just start off on the wrong foot. The patient leaving in a floor of tears is usually an indication that this has just occurred. On one of my medical placements I witnessed one such consultation. A young woman in the early stages of her pregnancy had a per vaginal bleed and wanted a scan to see if the pregnancy was still ok. Medically speaking, a scan wasn’t indicated as the pregnancy was too early on to detect any changes. The doctors noted the “agenda” as they later remarked, and was not going to “play the game” and send the young woman for a scan. She was not happy about this. The doctor felt that he couldn’t have done more. Medically there was nothing he could offer to the woman other than advice to go home and wait a little while before repeating a pregnancy test. To me, there was lots that could have been done. This woman was scared and worried and a sympathetic ear and a tissue would have gone some way to making her feel better. The doctor I was with couldn’t see this. They were blind sighted by the repeated requests for a scan and slightly frustrated that the unhelpfulness of this was not being understood. When the young woman began to cry I was waiting for the doctor to hand over a tissue. “Any second now...” I thought, but it never happened. I wanted to give the woman a tissue and put my arm around her but that would have meant physically placing myself between the doctor and the patients and interrupting a consultation I wasn’t really a part of. But the truth is. I was a part of that consultation. I might not have been the doctor in charge but I was another person in that room who could have made that situation easier for that patient and I didn’t. Hours later, on my way home, I was still thinking about this. I felt I had let that woman down. I could see what she needed and I sat there and did nothing. After the consultation I immediately told the doctor what I thought. I felt that the patient had been let down. They took on what I said and mostly agreed with it. All egos were put aside in that frank conversation and the doctor genuinely reflected on how they could have done better in that situation. It wasn’t about me or the doctor. It was about the patient. As a medical student it is easy to feel in the way in the hospital environment or in a busy clinic. When the consultant is running behind, it takes a lot to ask the patients something or butt in and add something you think is relevant that in the end may turn out to be a very trivial thing. But at the end of the day, it is worth it if it means that there is a better out come for the patient because when all is said and done they are the ones we are doing this all for. I regret not handing that patient a tissue and it’s a mistake I hope never to repeat again.  
Salma Aslam
almost 6 years ago
Www.bmj
0
15

An unusual finding on a pelvic radiograph

A 74 year old man presented to the ear, nose, and throat department with breathlessness on exertion, intermittent voice hoarseness, and a sensation of catarrh in his throat. After a laryngoscopy with biopsy was performed, he was diagnosed as having a low grade chondrosarcoma of the larynx. Before surgical debulking of the lesion was carried out he underwent computed tomography of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. This confirmed the presence of a subglottic mass in the larynx but also showed a mixed lytic and sclerotic expansile lesion (5.8 cm (longitudinal)×1.6 cm (axial)×4.5 cm) in the left iliac blade of the pelvis. The pelvic lesion was well corticated, with internal ossified septae and calcification. Expansion of the left iliac wing was noted, with no breach in the cortex.  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
39

Anatomy of Middle Ear 9/9

Visit http://www.DrNajeebLectures.com for 600+ videos on Basic Medical Sciences!  
youtube.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
2
33

Anatomy of Middle Ear 8/9

Visit http://www.DrNajeebLectures.com for 600+ videos on Basic Medical Sciences!  
youtube.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
33

Anatomy of Middle Ear 7/9

Visit http://www.DrNajeebLectures.com for 600+ videos on Basic Medical Sciences!  
youtube.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
1

Anatomy of Middle Ear 7/9 - YouTube

Anatomy of Middle Ear by Dr. Najeeb. Watch 400+ hours of Medical Lectures at http://www.DrNajeebLectures.com  
youtube.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
29

Anatomy of Middle Ear 6/9

Visit http://www.DrNajeebLectures.com for 600+ videos on Basic Medical Sciences!  
youtube.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
24

Anatomy of Middle Ear 5/9

Visit http://www.DrNajeebLectures.com for 600+ videos on Basic Medical Sciences!  
youtube.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
0

Anatomy of Middle Ear 4/9 - YouTube

Anatomy of Middle Ear by Dr. Najeeb. Watch 400+ hours of Medical Lectures at http://www.DrNajeebLectures.com  
youtube.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
1
43

Anatomy of Middle Ear 3/9

Visit http://www.DrNajeebLectures.com for 600+ videos on Basic Medical Sciences!  
youtube.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
31

Anatomy of Middle Ear 2/9

Visit http://www.DrNajeebLectures.com for 600+ videos on Basic Medical Sciences!  
youtube.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
24

After the Boston Marathon bombing, ears and hearing effects continue to reverberate

Study shows continued follow up and care of this patient population is warranted.  
medicalnewstoday.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
1

Complications of tube insertion in ears not worse for kids with cleft lip/palate

Children with cleft lip and/or palate (CLP) have no worse complications from ventilation tube (VT) insertion in their ears to treat otitis media with effusion (OME, a buildup of fluid in the...  
medicalnewstoday.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
6

Newborn butterfly project non-surgically corrects infant ear deformities

A team of researchers from Weill Cornell Medical College and NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center has improved a non-surgical procedure that safely and effectively corrects...  
medicalnewstoday.com
almost 5 years ago