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Study: Genes Play Role in Education Attainment | Inside Higher Ed

A study published Wednesday in the journal Nature, by a team of 253 scientists, identified 74 genetic variants that are associated with educational attainment. The researchers cautioned that the link was a small one, and that environmental factors were also at play.  
insidehighered.com
over 3 years ago
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Genetic link to education level real - but weak -

On the one hand, new findings published May 11 in the journal Nature simply confirm what people have long known from simple observation — that traits such as ’school smarts’ often run in families, just like red hair or excelling in sports. For neurologists and social scientists, on the other hand, discovering a genetic contribution to a person’s education level can be useful in helping better identify the various factors influencing brain development or academic success.  
sciencerecorder.com
over 3 years ago
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IDEA Series: A Novel Flipped-Classroom Approach to Intern Conference Education featuring EM Fundamentals

IDEA Series: A novel flipped-classroom approach to intern conference education. IDEA = Ideas in Didactics and Educational Activities. Editor: Dr. Mary Haas  
aliem.com
over 3 years ago
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UMEM Educational Pearls - University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine

Anger outbursts are bad for your heart. Out of 300 patients with an acute MI, just over 2% reported losing their temper within 2 hours of the event. A review of nine studies of rage and cardiovascular events all found an increase in cardiovascular events in the 2 hours preceding an anger outburst. Examples included arguments at home, at work or by road rage. Compared with their usual anger levels, the relative risk of heart attack from a fit of rage was 8.5.  
umem.org
over 3 years ago
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Evolving Science of PAH Treatment: A Paradigm Shift CME

As an organization accredited by the ACCME, Medscape, LLC, requires everyone who is in a position to control the content of an education activity to disclose all relevant financial relationships with any commercial interest. The ACCME defines "relevant financial relationships" as financial relationships in any amount, occurring within the past 12 months, including financial relationships of a spouse or life partner, that could create a conflict of interest.  
medscape.org
over 3 years ago
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UMEM Educational Pearls - University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine

Pick a category... Airway Management Cardiology Critical Care Critical Care Literature Update Dermatology Endocrine ENT Financial & Investing Gastrointestional Geriatrics Hematology/Oncology Infectious Disease International EM Med-Legal Medical Education Misc Neurology Obstetrics & Gynecology Ophthamology Orthopedics Pediatrics Pharmacology & Therapeutics Procedures Pulmonary Toxicology Trauma Urology Vascular Visual Diagnosis $('#pearl_categories').change(function(){ window.location = "/educational_pearls/search/?category=" + $(this).val() });  
umem.org
over 3 years ago
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American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) 2016 National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition

American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) 2016 National Teaching Institute and Critical Care Exposition: Read clinically focused news coverage of key developments from AACN 2016.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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JellyBean 032 with Ashley Liebig

Fear, Flight, Fight. Ashley Liebig is a Screaming Eagle. So at SMACC Chicago you had a 101st Airborne Division Medic talking about feelings. SMACC Star Ashley Liebig, now a Texan Flight Nurse rocked one of the Pre-SMACC US Workshops with a difficult subject, talking about dealing with critical events as a human inside a big……  
prehospitalmed.com
over 3 years ago
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Those Three Little Words

We welcome to the blog a new contributor. Greg Brown has a background in nursing and is one of the people who makes education at CareFlight happen, and with courses happening across the country and occasionally overseas there is a lot of happening to happen. Greg has also had a career with the military and…  
prehospitalmed.com
over 3 years ago
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UMEM Educational Pearls - University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine

Posted: 5/4/2016 by Jon Mark Hirshon, MD, MPH (Emailed: 5/18/2016) (Updated: 5/18/2016) Click here to contact Jon Mark Hirshon, MD, MPH  
umem.org
over 3 years ago
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WHAT A PITTY! POPE FRANCIS’ REAFFIRMs IN “AMORIS LAETITIA” THE BAN On CONTRACEPTION BY THE CATHOLIC CHURCH.

On April 8th Vatican released the long awaited publication by Pope Francis “Amoris Laetitia” (The Joy of Love). This very lengthy and comprehensive document deals with the many issues facing the family. There are many beautiful passages in it about a large number of issues. Many catholics around the world will be pleased to read about the Pope’s (Church’s) much more open and progressive views of such issues as divorce and homosexuality amongst many other issues. But in fact nothing has changed. In this document the Pope reaffirms the position of the Roman Catholic Church regarding the use of artificial methods of contraception. This statement is certainly very disappointing to many catholics. Only natural methods of family planning, the so called “fertility awareness methods” are condoned by the Catholic Church. That is just fine for motivated and somewhat educated couples, with some access to medical care and teaching; also this approach works best if the women has regular menstrual cycles. Medical advances have made these methods more sophisticated and precise than the original method, based on just counting the days of the menstrual cycle and abstaining from intercourse on the so called fertile days. Under ideal circumstances these natural methods have a high success and low failure rate, equal or better than some artificial methods. And many couples who use it are very satisfied with it, even though they still require a considerable amount of effort. Under less than ideal circumstances however, these natural methods have a high and unacceptable failure rate. This is true in our own country but especially in developing countries and areas (like refugee camps) where people live in squalor, lack food and most basic living needs, have no or inadequate medical care, and women often have very irregular or absent menstrual cycles, so that the natural methods of family planning become utterly impractical. Yet the Catholic Church insists that only these natural methods are acceptable. During his return last year from a visit to the Philippines, Pope Francis made the somewhat unexpected statement that catholic families would do well to limit their families to a manageable size. A most welcome recommendation indeed! However, during the same interview Pope Francis again reaffirmed the opposition by the Church to any form of artificial birth control. How then are the people living under less than ideal circumstances as I described above, supposed to adhere to the Pope’s recommendations to limit the seize of their family? The natural methods have a high failure rate under these conditions. It seems to me that the Pope (and the Catholic Church) can not have it both ways and place these people before a very unfair dilemma. Either adhere to the Church’s teaching and attempt to use the natural methods of family planning that are allowed, but in doing so risk an unwanted pregnancy, or ignore the teaching and use the many artificial methods available and in doing so be marginalized by the Church to which they belong. A very large number of professed catholics world-wide are choosing the latter option, and that includes me. Many of the catholic priests, with whom I have discussed this issue will tell me to ignore the Church’s teaching, follow my conscience, and continue with my practice of prescribing artificial methods of contraception and carrying out permanent sterilization procedures. (I am a gynecologist). That is of course just fine for me, but in the overall picture of things, it makes no sense. If rules, regulation, and laws are such that a vast majority of people, including those in position of authority are ignoring them, is it then not time for the leadership to seriously review and hopefully modify the rules? That, to me and to many of my catholic colleagues and patients, seems only logical. In that sense the recent publication by Pope Francis is certainly most disappointing.  
DR William LeMaire
over 3 years ago
12
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WHAT A PITTY! POPE FRANCIS’ REAFFIRMs IN “AMORIS LAETITIA” THE BAN On CONTRACEPTION BY THE CATHOLIC CHURCH.

On April 8th Vatican released the long awaited publication by Pope Francis “Amoris Laetitia” (The Joy of Love). This very lengthy and comprehensive document deals with the many issues facing the family. There are many beautiful passages in it about a large number of issues. Many catholics around the world will be pleased to read about the Pope’s (Church’s) much more open and progressive views of such issues as divorce and homosexuality amongst many other issues. But in fact nothing has changed. In this document the Pope reaffirms the position of the Roman Catholic Church regarding the use of artificial methods of contraception. This statement is certainly very disappointing to many catholics. Only natural methods of family planning, the so called “fertility awareness methods” are condoned by the Catholic Church. That is just fine for motivated and somewhat educated couples, with some access to medical care and teaching; also this approach works best if the women has regular menstrual cycles. Medical advances have made these methods more sophisticated and precise than the original method, based on just counting the days of the menstrual cycle and abstaining from intercourse on the so called fertile days. Under ideal circumstances these natural methods have a high success and low failure rate, equal or better than some artificial methods. And many couples who use it are very satisfied with it, even though they still require a considerable amount of effort. Under less than ideal circumstances however, these natural methods have a high and unacceptable failure rate. This is true in our own country but especially in developing countries and areas (like refugee camps) where people live in squalor, lack food and most basic living needs, have no or inadequate medical care, and women often have very irregular or absent menstrual cycles, so that the natural methods of family planning become utterly impractical. Yet the Catholic Church insists that only these natural methods are acceptable. During his return last year from a visit to the Philippines, Pope Francis made the somewhat unexpected statement that catholic families would do well to limit their families to a manageable size. A most welcome recommendation indeed! However, during the same interview Pope Francis again reaffirmed the opposition by the Church to any form of artificial birth control. How then are the people living under less than ideal circumstances as I described above, supposed to adhere to the Pope’s recommendations to limit the seize of their family? The natural methods have a high failure rate under these conditions. It seems to me that the Pope (and the Catholic Church) can not have it both ways and place these people before a very unfair dilemma. Either adhere to the Church’s teaching and attempt to use the natural methods of family planning that are allowed, but in doing so risk an unwanted pregnancy, or ignore the teaching and use the many artificial methods available and in doing so be marginalized by the Church to which they belong. A very large number of professed catholics world-wide are choosing the latter option, and that includes me. Many of the catholic priests, with whom I have discussed this issue will tell me to ignore the Church’s teaching, follow my conscience, and continue with my practice of prescribing artificial methods of contraception and carrying out permanent sterilization procedures. (I am a gynecologist). That is of course just fine for me, but in the overall picture of things, it makes no sense. If rules, regulation, and laws are such that a vast majority of people, including those in position of authority are ignoring them, is it then not time for the leadership to seriously review and hopefully modify the rules? That, to me and to many of my catholic colleagues and patients, seems only logical. In that sense the recent publication by Pope Francis is certainly most disappointing.  
DR William LeMaire
over 3 years ago
13
1
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ARTIFICIAL CONTRACEPTION STILL BANNED BY THE CATHOLIC CHURCH.

WHAT A PITTY AND A MISSED OPPORTUNITY. POPE FRANCIS’ REAFFIRMS IN “AMORIS LAETITIA” THE BAN ON CONTRACEPTION BY THE CATHOLIC CHURCH. On April 8th Vatican released the long awaited publication by Pope Francis “Amoris Laetitia” (The Joy of Love). This very lengthy and comprehensive document deals with the many issues facing the family. There are many beautiful passages in it about a large number of issues. Many catholics around the world will be pleased to read about the Pope’s (Church’s) much more open and progressive views of such issues as divorce and homosexuality amongst many other issues. But in fact nothing has changed. In this document the Pope reaffirms the position of the Roman Catholic Church regarding the use of artificial methods of contraception. This statement is certainly very disappointing to many catholics and to catholic medical care givers. Only natural methods of family planning, the so called “fertility awareness methods” are condoned by the Catholic Church. That is just fine for motivated and somewhat educated couples, with some access to medical care and teaching; also this approach works best if the women has regular menstrual cycles. Medical advances have made these methods more sophisticated and precise than the original method, based on just counting the days of the menstrual cycle and abstaining from intercourse on the so called fertile days. Under ideal circumstances these natural methods have a high success and low failure rate, equal or better than some artificial methods. And many couples who use it are very satisfied with it, even though they still require a considerable amount of effort. Under less than ideal circumstances however, these natural methods have a high and unacceptable failure rate. This is true in our own country but especially in developing countries and areas (like refugee camps) where people live in squalor, lack food and most basic living needs, have no or inadequate medical care, and women often have very irregular or absent menstrual cycles, so that the natural methods of family planning become utterly impractical. Yet the Catholic Church insists that only these natural methods are acceptable. During his return last year from a visit to the Philippines, Pope Francis made the somewhat unexpected statement that catholic families would do well to limit their families to a manageable size. A most welcome recommendation indeed! However, during the same interview Pope Francis again reaffirmed the opposition by the Church to any form of artificial birth control. How then are the people living under less than ideal circumstances as I described above, supposed to adhere to the Pope’s recommendations to limit the seize of their family? The natural methods have a high failure rate under these conditions. It seems to me that the Pope (and the Catholic Church) can not have it both ways and place these people before a very unfair dilemma. Either adhere to the Church’s teaching and attempt to use the natural methods of family planning that are allowed, but in doing so risk an unwanted pregnancy, or ignore the teaching and use the many artificial methods available and in doing so be marginalized by the Church to which they belong. A very large number of professed catholics world-wide are choosing the latter option, and that includes me. Some of the catholic priests, with whom I have discussed this issue will tell me to ignore the Church’s teaching, follow my conscience, and continue with my practice of prescribing artificial methods of contraception and carrying out permanent sterilization procedures. (I am a gynecologist). That is of course just fine for me, but in the overall picture of things, it makes no sense. If rules, regulation, and laws are such that a vast majority of people, including those in position of authority are ignoring them, is it then not time for the leadership to seriously review and hopefully modify the rules? That, to me and to many of my catholic colleagues and patients, seems only logical. In that sense the recent publication by Pope Francis is certainly most disappointing. William J. LeMaire MD Emeritus Professor Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology University of Miami Miller School of Medicine  
DR William LeMaire
over 3 years ago
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Improving Quality of Anticoagulation Management Using Point-of-Care Testing CME/CE

As an organization accredited by the ACCME, Medscape, LLC, requires everyone who is in a position to control the content of an education activity to disclose all relevant financial relationships with any commercial interest. The ACCME defines "relevant financial relationships" as financial relationships in any amount, occurring within the past 12 months, including financial relationships of a spouse or life partner, that could create a conflict of interest.  
medscape.org
over 3 years ago
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UMEM Educational Pearls - University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine

Keywords: Apparent life threatening event, ALTE, apnea, low risk infants, brief unexplained resolved events (PubMed Search)  
umem.org
over 3 years ago
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Education, Reminders Reduce Risky Prescriptions for Elders

Education and electronic reminders can reduce the prescription of potentially inappropriate medication to older patients discharged from the emergency department, new research shows.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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AAP Calls for a Full-time Nurse in Every School

Nurses should team up with a physician in every district, the policy paper adds. Medical, legal, and societal needs call for highlighting the school nurse role to improve health and school attendance.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Training for Stress - INTENSIVE

The session was based on last year’s SMACC Chicago workshop ‘Learning to take the heat’ (see Learning to the heat at #SMACCUS – we’re doing it again at SMACCDUB soon…) Since then, a superb post was published at St Emlyn’s on Robert Lloyd’s experience working in South Africa, titled An Englishman in South Africa: Robert Lloyd. This reads as a case study in how anyone can succumb to the acute stress response when they perceive a threat to exceed their ability to cope. It is also a case study in how to go about rectifying the issue using stress training techniques. Hats off to Robert for sharing his experience, it is a must read!  
intensiveblog.com
over 3 years ago
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UMEM Educational Pearls - University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine

The ATS conference was last week in San Francisco and a few cool articles were presented. They are briefly summarized below:  
umem.org
over 3 years ago
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Student bursary cut 'may worsen NHS staff shortages' - BBC News

Plans to scrap student bursaries and charge nurses and other health staff for their degrees in England could backfire, unions are warning.  
bbc.co.uk
over 3 years ago