New to Meducation?
Sign up
Already signed up? Log In

Category

Preview 300x412
2
437

Innovative Programme Elements Add Value to a FAIMER Regional Institute Faculty Development Fellowship Model in Southern Africa

The Foundation for the Advancement of Medical Education and Research (FAIMER) is a US-based non-profit organisation committed to improving health professions education to improve global health. FAIMER traditionally offers a two year fellowship programme; 2 residential and 3 distance learning sessions and an education innovation project in the fellow’s home institution. The focus is on education methods, leadership/management, scholarship and the development of an international community of health professions educators. During the past 5 years, FAIMER has expanded the programme and established regional institutes in India[3], Brazil[1] and Southern Africa (SAFRI)[1]. We implemented the programme in Africa in 2008, introducing 5 innovations to the generic programme. SAFRI was created as an independent voluntary association to reflect the multinational intent of the programme. Aim of project To understand the impact of the innovations in the structure and implementation of the programme on its quality and the experience of the participants in it. Conclusions Faculty development programmes can significantly enhance their impact: Be sensitive to the local political climate Demonstrate wide ownership Focus on developing a community of practice Work within the professional time constraints of Fellows and faculty Maximise learning opportunities by linking to other scholarly activities  
Juanita Bezuidenhout
about 10 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1dozpdh?1444774176
2
149

Imagine a world where procrastination became a productive pastime…

Imagine a world where procrastination became a productive pastime… Procrastination, as it stands, is a core feature of the ‘human condition’ and most would argue that it is here to stay. However, what if we could hijack the time we spend playing Candy Crush saga and trick ourselves into contributing towards something tangible. Today, I wish to explore this possibility with you. The phrase ‘gamification’ is not a new or made up word (I promise) although I agree it does sound jarring and I certainly wouldn’t recommend trying to use it in a game of scrabble (yet). The phrase itself refers to the process of applying game thinking and game mechanics to non-game contexts to engage users in solving problems. For our purposes and for the purposes of this blog ‘problems’ will equate to promoting healthy living for our patients and maintaining our own medical education. For one reason or another, most people show addictive behaviour towards games especially when they incorporate persistent elements of progression, achievement and competition with others. The underlying psychology won’t be discussed here; call it escapism, call it procrastination, call it whatever you will. What I want you to realise is that every day millions of people spend hours tending to virtual farms and cyber families whilst competing vigorously with ‘online’ friends. If we can take the addictive aspects of these popular games and incorporate them in to the non-game contexts I indicated to above, we could potentially trick ourselves, and even perhaps our patients, into a better way of life. The first time I heard the phrase ‘gamification’ was only last year. I was in Paris attending the Doctors 2.0 conference listening to talks on how cutting edge technologies and the Internet had been (or were going to be) incorporated into healthcare. One example that stood out to me was a gaming app that intended to engage people with diabetes to record their blood sugars more regularly and also compete with themselves to achieve better sugar control. People who have the condition of Diabetes Mellitus are continuously reminded of their diet and their blood sugar levels. I am not diabetic myself, but it is not hard to realise that diet and sugar control is going to be an absolute nightmare for people with diabetes both from a practical and psychological standpoint. Cue the mySugr Compainion, an FDA approved mobile application that was created to incorporate the achievement and progression aspects of game design to help encourage people with diabetes to achieve better sugar control. The app was a novel concept that struck a chord with me due to its potential to appeal to the part in everyone’s brain that makes them sit down and play ‘just one more level’ of their favorite game or app. There are several other apps on the market that are games designed to encourage self testing of blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. There is even a paediatric example titled; “Monster Manor,” which was launched by the popular Sanofi UK (who previously released the FDA / CE approved iBGStar iPhone blood glucose monitor). So applying aspects of game design into disease management apps has anecdotally been shown to benefit young people with Diabetes. However, disease management is just one area where game-health apps have emerged. We are taught throughout medical school and beyond that disease prevention is obviously beneficial to both our patients and the health economy. Unsurprisingly, one of the best ways to prevent disease is to maintain health (either through exercise and / or healthy eating). A prominent example of an app that helps to engage users in exercising is ‘RunKeeper,’ a mobile app that enables people to track and publish their latest jog-around-the-park. The elements of game design are a little more subtle in this example but the ability to track your own progress and compete with others via social media share buttons certainly reminds me of similar features seen in most of today’s online games. Other examples of ‘healthy living apps’ are rife amongst the respective ‘app stores,’ and there seems to be ample opportunity for the appliance of gamification in this field. An example might be to incorporate aspects of game design into a smoking cessation app or weight loss helper. Perhaps the addictive quality of a well designed game-app could overpower the urge for confectionary or that ‘last cigarette’… The last area where I think ‘gamification’ could have a huge benefit is in (medical) education. Learning and revising are particularly susceptible to the rot of procrastination, so it goes without saying that many educational vendors have already attempted to incorporate fresh ways in which they can engage their users to put down the TV remote and pick up some knowledge for the exams. Meducation itself already has an area on its website entitled ‘Exam Room,’ where you can test yourself, track your progress and provide feedback on the questions you are given. I have always found this a far more addictive way to revise than sitting down with pen and paper to revise from a book. However, I feel there could be a far greater incorporation of game design in the field of medical education. Perhaps the absolute dream for like-minded gamers out there would be a super-gritty medical simulator that exposes you to common medical emergencies from the comfort of your own computer screen. I mean, my shiny new gaming console lets me pretend to be an elite solider deep behind enemy lines so why not let me pretend and practice to be a doctor too? You could even have feedback functionality to indicate where your management might have deviated from the optimum. Perhaps more sensibly, the potential also exists to build on the existing banks of online medical questions to incorporate further aspects of social media interaction, achievement unlocks and inter-player competition (because in case you hadn’t noticed, medics are a competitive breed). I have given a couple of very basic examples on how aspects of game design have emerged in recent health-related apps. I feel this phenomenon is in its infancy. The technology exists for so much more than the above, we just need to use our imagination… and learn how to code.  
Dr. Luke Farmery
almost 6 years ago
Preview
2
26

Complex Regional Pain Syndrome - Causes, Treatment & Therapies - Gold Canyon AZ

The Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is an unceasing pain condition that often affects one of the limbs (that can be arms, legs, hands, or feet), generally after an injury or trauma to that particular limb. Complex regional pain syndrome is believed to be caused due to damage, or malfunctioning of the peripheral and central nervous systems. The central nervous system encompasses the brain and spinal cord; whereas the peripheral nervous system includes the nerve signaling from the brain and the spinal cord to the other parts of the body. The Complex Regional Pain Syndrome is exemplified by prolonged or a chronic pain and mild or dramatic changes in the color of the skin, temperature or even swelling in the affecting area.  
calmareaz.com
about 4 years ago
10
1
20

Disaster Management

It is Sunday 8.31.08 and for hurricane Gustav is bearing down on the city of New Orleans.  This podcast will discuss the basic elements of disaster planning and management. (This was reposted due to some technical problems with the server.)  
Jeffrey S. Guy, MD, FACS
over 9 years ago
Preview
1
51

AAO-Internet Marketing Strategies for Ophthalmology

<a href="http://web.me.com/robertmelendez/Eye-Q_Doctor/Media/ANdy%20Doan%27s%20Internet%20Course.m4a"><img src="http://web.me.com/robertmelendez/Eye-Q_Doctor/Eye-Q_Doctor_Podcasts/Media/droppedImage.jpg" style="float:left; padding-right:10px; padding-bottom:10px; width:183px; height:137px;"/></a>433 Internet Marketing Strategies for Ophthalmology Practices<br/>SYNOPSIS This course offers an overview of how to market ophthalmic practices using Internet resources. This instruction is applicable to small, large, and university practices and discusses the use of search engine optimization, search engine advertising, click ad advertising, and Web site marketing strategies. OBJECTIVES By the conclusion of this course, participants will (1) learn about search engine optimization and how to use articles and blogs to attract patients to the practice website, (2) learn about search engine advertising, the costs associated with Internet advertising, and how to determine return on investment (ROI), (3) learn about pay-per-click and pay-per-impression advertising campaigns and how to determine ROI, and (4) learn about effective Web site planning and elements to enhance your ROI.<br/>Senior Instructor: Andrew P Doan MD PhD<br/>Date and Time: Monday, October 26, 2009 10:15 AM - 12:30 PM<br/>Location: San Francisco Marriott<br/><br/>Room: Yerba Buena 12<br/><br/>  
Rob Melendez, MD, MBA
over 9 years ago
29746
1
50

Mental Status Abnormal

Orientation, Memor This patient has difficulty with orientation questions. The day of the week is correct but he misses the month and date. He is oriented to place. Orientation mistakes are not localizing but can be due to problems with memory, language, judgement, attention or concentration. The patient has good recent memory (declarative memory) as evidenced by the recall of three objects but has difficulty with long term memory as evidenced by the difficulty recalling the current and past presidents. Attention-working memor The patient has difficulty with digit span backwards, spelling backwards and giving the names of the months in reverse order. This indicates a problem with working memory and maintaining attention, both of which are frontal lobe functions. Judgement-abstract reasoning The patient gives the correct answer for a house on fire and his answers for similarities are also good. He has problems with proverb interpretation. His answers are concrete and consist of rephrasing the proverb or giving a simple consequence of the action in the proverb. Problems with judgement, abstract reasoning, and executive function can be seen in patients with frontal lobe dysfunction. Set generatio Set generation tests word fluency and frontal lobe function. The patient starts well but abruptly stops after only four words. Most individuals can give more then 10 words in one minute. Receptive languag Patients with a receptive aphasia (Wernicke’s) cannot comprehend language. Their speech output is fluent but is devoid of meaning and contains nonsense syllables or words (neologisms). Their sentences are usually lacking nouns and there are paraphasias (one word substituted for another). The patient is usually unaware of their language deficit and prognosis for recovery is poor. This patient’s speech is fluent and some of her sentences even make sense but she also has nonsense sentences, made up of words and parts of words. She can’t name objects (anomia). She doesn’t have a pure or complete receptive aphasia but pure receptive aphasias are rare. Expressive languag This patient with expressive aphasia has normal comprehension but her expression of language is impaired. Her speech output is nonfluent and often limited to just a few words or phases. Grammatical words such as prepositions are left out and her speech is telegraphic. She has trouble saying “no ifs , ands or buts”. Her ability to write is also effected Patients with expressive aphasia are aware of their language deficit and are often frustrated by it. Recovery can occur but is often incomplete with their speech consisting of short phrases or sentences containing mainly nouns and verbs. Praxi The patient does well on most of the tests of praxis. At the very end when he is asked to show how to cut with scissors he uses his fingers as the blades of the scissors instead of acting like he is holding onto the handles of the scissors and cutting. This can be an early finding of inferior parietal lobe dysfunction. Gnosi With his right hand the patient has more difficulty identifying objects then with his left hand. One must be careful in interpreting the results of this test because of the patient’s motor deficits but there does seem to be astereognosis on the right, which would indicate left parietal lobe dysfunction. This is confirmed with graphesthesia where he definitely has more problems identifying numbers written on the right hand then the left (agraphesthesia of the right hand). Dominant parietal lobe functio This patient has right-left confusion and difficulty with simple arithmetic. These are elements of the Gertsmann syndrome, which is seen in lesions of the dominant parietal lobe. The full syndrome consists of right-left confusion, finger agnosia, agraphia and acalculia.  
Neurologic Exam
almost 9 years ago
Preview
1
39

WHO guidelines on Sodium and Potassium intake (Adults & Children)

The recent guidelines will be of interest to all physicians/internists/pediatricians who are concerned about non-communicable diseases ("life-style diseases").  
Dr Kannuvellil E Rajan
almost 7 years ago
Preview
1
48

Chemistry Revision - Elements and Atoms

http://armandoh.org/  
Nicole Chalmers
almost 6 years ago
Preview
1
25

Stanstead Abbotts man's delight with titanium cranium - BBC News

A man who had chunk of his skull removed after a balcony fall says he feels good after his head was "fixed".  
BBC News
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
16

Emergency! Call the camera crew. How saving lives became prime-time gold

From the antiseptic routine of the wards to the thrill of a roadside rescue, we can't seem to get enough of medical documentaries. Andrew Collins dissects our enduring fascination  
the Guardian
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
12

Hydrogen-powered Party Poppers - The Naked Scientists

Naked Scientists - 24th Dec 2013 - Hydrogen-powered Party Poppers  
thenakedscientists.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
13

The Hydrogen Economy: Fuelling the Future - The Naked Scientists

Naked Scientists - 18th Aug 2012 - The Hydrogen Economy: Fuelling the Future  
thenakedscientists.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
12

How Science Goes for Gold - The Naked Scientists

Naked Scientists - 28th Jul 2012 - How Science Goes for Gold  
thenakedscientists.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
11

Outpacing Petrol - Biofuels and Hydrogen - The Naked Scientists

Naked Scientists - 8th Oct 2011 - Outpacing Petrol - Biofuels and Hydrogen  
thenakedscientists.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
8

Coal Gasification and Carbon Capture - The Naked Scientists

Naked Scientists - 18th Jun 2011 - Coal Gasification and Carbon Capture  
thenakedscientists.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
21

ISCD ~ Independent Scientific Committee on Drugs

In clear and accessible language, Professor David Nutt’s Drugs Without the Hot Air argues the case for an evidence-based approach, challenging elements of drug policy and myths on the relative harms of legal and illegal drugs.  
drugscience.org.uk
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
1
26

Care of dying review shows shortcomings in palliative care

Most hospitals have not put in place some of the fundamental elements needed to help ensure a “good” death for patients, such as seven day access to specialist palliative care and mandatory training for staff caring for dying patients, an audit led by the Royal College of Physicians has found.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
24

Internal medicine on Instagram: “Kayser-Fleischer ring: Kayser-Fleischer ring (arrow) in a patient with advanced neuropsychiatric Wilson disease. The dense brown copper…”

“Kayser-Fleischer ring: Kayser-Fleischer ring (arrow) in a patient with advanced neuropsychiatric Wilson disease. The dense brown copper deposits encircle…”  
Instagram
over 5 years ago
Preview
1
38

How much potassium is good for you? High/Low Potassium Foods Lists

High/low potassium foods, kidney disease, sodium/potassium ratio, hypokalemia, hyperkalemia, potassium supplements for kidney stones and blood pressure.  
nutrientsreview.com
over 5 years ago