New to Meducation?
Sign up
Already signed up? Log In

Category

Preview
1
9

Oncologic Emergencies: Tumor Lysis Syndrome

A brief explanation of tumor lysis syndrome and it's treatment.  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
Preview
1
6

Oncologic Emergencies: Venous Thromboembolism

Venous thromboembolism and pulmonary embolism are common in cancer patients. In this video I discuss the underlying pathophysiology of these conditions.  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
Preview
1
42

Introduction to Oncologic Emergencies

Common oncologic emergencies, and how they are related to the underlying pathophysiology of cancer and its treatment.  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
Preview
1
31

acute glaucoma

http://www.rooteyedictionary.com/acute-glaucoma/ Acute glaucoma is one of the few emergencies in ophthalmology. It occurs when the drainage pathway in the ey...  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
8
1
47

Figure 1 Website

Medical instagram, plenty of emergency and other related topics reside! From interpreting ECGs & reading X-rays, there is plenty to contribute to!  
app.figure1.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
1
6

Is the United Nations catching up with Ebola at last?

After the World Health Organization’s much criticised delayed reaction to Ebola, the UN has sent in its big guns to tackle the outbreak. Nigel Hawkes and Sophie Arie report on the UN’s first emergency health mission  
bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
8
395

An Introduction to Pediatric Emergencies

A clear and consise overview of pediatric emergencies.  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
Preview
4
204

Pediatric Respiratory Emergencies

Respiratory Emergencies refresher tutorial.  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
10
1
8

WHO | Statement on the 4th meeting of the IHR Emergency Committee regarding the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa

The 4th meeting of IHR Emergency Committee was convened to review, in accordance with IHR provisions, whether the event continued to constitute a Public Health Emergency of International Concern.  
who.int
over 4 years ago
Sigmoidvolvulus
1
9

Boxmedicine: Sigmoid Volvulus

Sigmoid volvulus is the most common volvulus of the GI tract and it is an important topic to understand for your exams and for life as a new doctor. How does it present? How do you manage it? Included in this tutorial is an illustration to demonstrate the emergency surgery involved when a patient has a sigmoid volvulus requiring laparotomy.  
boxmedicine.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
1
22

New Welsh emergency service fleet unveiled - BBC News

A new fleet of emergency service team is unveiled which will include a fleet of 4x4s and consultants flying with the Wales Air Ambulance.  
BBC News
over 4 years ago
Preview
1
8

A&E in England misses target for whole of winter - BBC News

The NHS in England has missed its accident and emergency waiting time target for every week of the winter, figures show.  
BBC News
over 4 years ago
Preview
1
3

Hospitals 'struggling' with A&E targets - BBC News

The NHS in England has missed its Accident and Emergency waiting time target for every week of this winter.  
BBC News
over 4 years ago
7
0
5

As doctors, how can we best provide medical aid abroad?

This is a question I put to members of the Sheffield group but I think it would be interesting to open this question up to a wider audience as I know a lot of people have strong views on this topic! What sort of work should doctors be doing when they go to a foreign country to do medical aid? Is medical aid ever misdirected? What aid is effective? The discussion stems from the obvious need and benefit of English doctors working for charities abroad, but what exactly should we be doing when we get there? Should our priority be emergency aid work in a third world country hit by a natural disaster, or should we be training doctors in third world countries to leave a long term benefit? I'd be interested to hear people's views on how medical aid can be implemented, improved, and carried out.  
Nicole Abdul
over 8 years ago
10
0
145

Who is able to carry out an Emergency Detention of a patient?

Using the Mental Health Act (Scotland) 2003: In order to carry out an Emergency detention of a patient is FY2 the most junior position that is able to do this (in conjunction with a mental health officer)? i.e. could a FY1 detain someone?  
Lesley Megahy
over 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 xiiska?1444773936
8
612

I'm Not Your Typical SHO...

I'm an SHO, but I don't have your typical ward based job. In the last four years I have treated in jungles, underwater (in scuba gear), 5m from a gorilla, up a volcano, on a beach, at altitude, on safari, in a bog and on a boat. Expedition medicine is a great way to travel the world, take time out whist expanding your CV, and be physically and mentally challenged and develop your skill and knowledge base. As a doctor, you can undertake expeditions during your 'spare time' but it is more common for doctors to go on expeditions between F2 and specialty training. This is the ideal time either because you have been working for the last 7 years and either you need a break, the NHS has broken you, or you don't know what you want to do with your career and need time to think. At this point I would recommend using your F2 course/study budget on an Expedition Medicine course. They are expensive, but the knowledge and skill base you gain makes you more prepared and competitive for expedition jobs. There are many types of Expedition Medicine jobs ranging from endurance sports races to scientific expeditions. Although the jobs differ, there are many ailments common to all. You should expect to treat diarrhoea and vomiting, insect bites, blisters, cuts, injuries, and GP complaints such headaches and exacerbations of chronic illnesses. More serious injuries and illnesses can occur so it is good to be prepared as possible. To help, ensure your medical kit is labelled and organised e.g. labelled cannulation kit, emergency kit is always accessible and you are familiar with the casevac plan. Your role as an Expedition Medic involves more that the treatment of clients. A typical job also includes client selection and education, risk assessment, updating casevac plans, stock-checking kit, health promotion, project management and writing debriefs. What's Right For You? If you're keen to do Expedition Medicine, first think about where you want to go and then for how long. Think hard about these choices. A 6 month expedition through the jungle sounds exciting, but if you don't like spiders, creepy-crawlies and leaches, and the furthest you have travelled is an all-inclusive to Mallorca, then it might be best to start with a 4 week expedition in France. When you have an idea of what you want to do there are many organisations that you can apply to, including: Operation Wallacea Raleigh Across the Divide World Challenge Floating Doctors Doctors Without Borders Royal Geographical Society Action Challenge GapForce Each organisation will have different aims, clients, resources and responsibilities so pick one that suits you. Have fun and feel free to post any question below.  
Dr Rachel Saunders
over 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1ecatpw?1444774000
9
17338

My transition from medical student to patient

I started medical school in 2007 wanting to 'making people better'. I stopped medical school in 2010 facing the reality of not being able to get better myself, being ill and later to be diagnosed with several long term health conditions. This post is about my transition from being a medical student, to the other side - being a patient. There are many things I wish I knew about long-term health conditions and patients when I was a medical student. I hope that through this post, current medical students can become aware of some of theses things and put them into practice as doctors themselves. I went to medical school because I wanted to help people and make them better. I admired doctors up on their pedestals for their knowledge and skills and expertise to 'fix things'. The hardest thing for me was accepting that doctors can't always make people better - they couldn't make me better. Holding doctors so highly meant it was very difficult for me to accept their limitations when it came to incurable long-term conditions and then to accept that as a patient I had capacity myself to help my conditions and situation. Having studied medicine at a very academic university, I had a very strict perception of knowledge. Knowledge was hard and fast medical facts that were taught in a formal setting. I worked all day and night learning the anatomical names for all the muscles in the eye, the cranial nerves and citric acid cycle, not to mention the pharmacology in second year. Being immersed in that academic scientific environment, I correlated expertise with PhDs and papers. It was a real challenge to realise that knowledge doesn't always have to be acquired through a formal educational but that it can be acquired through experience. Importantly, knowledge acquired through experience is equally valid! This means the knowledge my clinicians have developed through studying and working is as valid as my knowledge of my conditions, symptoms and triggers, developed through experiencing it day in day out. I used to feel cross about 'expert patients' - I have spent all these hours in a library learning the biochemistry and pharmacology and 'Joe Bloggs' walks in and knows it all! That wasn't the right attitude, and wasn't fair on patients. As an expert patient myself now, I have come to understood that we are experts through different means, and in different fields. My clinicians remain experts in the biological aspects on disease, but that's not the full picture. I am an expert in the psychological and social impact of my conditions. All aspects need to be taken into account if I am going to have holistic integrated care - the biopsychosocial model in practice - and that's where shared-decision making comes in. The other concept which is has been shattered since making the transition from medical student to patient is that of routine. In my first rotation, orthopaedics and rheumatology, I lost track within the first week of how many outpatient appointments I sat in on. I didn't really think anything of them - they are just another 15 minute slot of time filled with learning in a very busy day. As a patient, my perspective couldn't be more different. I have one appointment with my consultant a year, and spend weeks planning and preparing, then a month recovering emotionally. Earlier this year I wrote a whole post just about this - The Anatomy of an Appointment. Appointments are routine for you - they are not for us! The concept of routine applies to symptoms too. After my first relapse, I had an emergency appointment with my consultant, and presented with very blurred vision and almost total loss of movement in my hands. That very fact I had requested an urgent appointment suggest how worried I was. My consultants response in the appointment was "there is nothing alarming about your symptoms". I fully appreciate that my symptoms may not have meant I was going to drop dead there and then, and that in comparison to his patients in ICU, I was not as serious. But loosing vision and all use of ones hands at the age of 23 (or any age for that matter) is alarming in my books! I guess he was trying to reassure me, but it didn't come across like that! I have a Chiari malformation (in addition to Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome and Elhers-Danlos Syndrome) and have been referred to a neurosurgeon to discuss the possibility of neurosurgery. It is stating the obvious to say that for a neurosurgeon, brain surgery is routine - it's their job! For me, the prospect of even being referred to a neurosurgeon was terrifying, before I even got to the stage of discussing the operation. It is not a routine experience at all! At the moment, surgery is not needed (phew!) but the initial experience of this contact with neurosurgeons illustrates the concept of routines and how much our perspectives differ. As someone with three quite rare and complex conditions, I am invariable met in A&E with comments like "you are so interesting!". I remember sitting in the hospital cafeteria at lunch as a student and literally feasting on the 'fascinating' cases we had seen on upstairs on the wards that morning. "oh you must go and see that really interesting patient with X, Y and Z!" I am so thankful that you all find medicine so interesting - you need that passion and fascination to help you with the ongoing learning and drive to be a doctor. I found it fascinating too! But I no longer find neurology that interesting - it is too close to home. Nothing is "interesting" if you live with it day in day out. No matter what funky things my autonomic nervous may be doing, there is nothing interesting or fascinating about temporary paralysis, headaches and the day to day grind of my symptoms. This post was inspired by NHS Change Day (13th March 2013) - as a patient, I wanted to share these few things with medical students, what I wish I knew when I was where you are now, to help the next generation of doctors become the very best doctors they can. I wish you all the very best for the rest of your studies, and thank you very much for reading! Anya de Iongh www.thepatientpatient2011.blogspot.co.uk @anyadei  
Anya de Iongh
over 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 8mqjwi?1444774048
2
3670

An amazing incident

It's been a while since I've added any thoughts to this blog. In that time I have finished my Obs/Gynae placement, I have spent a week on labour ward, and done my first week of my 4th year surgical placement. All the while cramming in revision between various activities and general staying alive measures. This, I feel, is how most people who are sitting their final written exams are spending their time, so I don't feel so alone. I just want to bring to the attention one amazing incident that happened on my labour ward week. I was on a night shift, there wasn't a lot going on. Absolutely everyone was knackered, the registrar who'd been on nights for the past week was just chatting to me. I have never seen someone look so tired. The emergency alarm went off and a lady had a cord prolapse, which is an obstetric emergency with a high foetal mortality rate. Now I think it's amazing that the doctor went from nearly falling asleep to switched on 'surgical-mode' in an instant, successfully performed the C-section, delivering the baby in about a minute, then went back to being absolutely knackered and let the SHO close up the wound. It just really impressed me and I felt it was something worth sharing. Actually I was incredibly surprised that I enjoyed Obs/Gynae. Women's health was a placement I was dreading, it was my last major knowledge gap and I didn't have a clue what it was going to be like. If my tutor for the block does read this, thank you for all your help and getting me involved in everything. I would encourage other students who are going into it and feeling any level of apprehension to just throw yourselves into it and give 110% effort. It is a great placement for practicing transferable skills (this is important to remember, especially if you don't have any desire to go into it you CAN transfer and practice skills from elsewhere!) and getting heavily involved in patient care. Also I'd like to point out the Mother and Baby were fine :)  
Conrad Hayes
over 6 years ago