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Seizures

Seizures happen when the brain has a burst of abnormal electrical signals for a short period of time. This video explains why they occur and what treatments ...  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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Folic Acid Linked to Less Autism in Kids of Women With Epilepsy

New research suggests that women with epilepsy who take an antiepileptic drug should start taking folic acid supplements as early as possible in pregnancy, if not before.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Risk for Febrile Seizure After Multiple Vaccines Is Low

The incidence of febrile seizures in children 6 to 23 months of age increased when multiple vaccines are given at once, but the absolute risk remains low, according to new data.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Aura Symptoms Highly Variable in Patients With Migraine

Only about half of patients have nausea during a migraine attack, new prospectively collected data suggest.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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SUDEP Rate Lower in Epilepsy Patients After VNS

A new large observational study increases the power of previous studies by 100-fold and suggests patients with drug-resistant epilepsy treated with vagus nerve stimulation have a reduced risk of sudden death.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Febrile Seizures

Febrile seizures, or seizures that occur during a fever, are one of the most common neurologic disorders of childhood. They typically appear between 6 months...  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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1
10

Epilepsy

Epilepsy is a seizure disorder that affects thousands of adults and children. A cis when the brain has a burst of abnormal electrical signals over a short pe...  
youtube.com
over 3 years ago
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9

Seizure and Fever

In this case, CT scan findings provided important clues in the diagnosis of HSV encephalitis.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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A New Drug and a New Rash

A child with epilepsy develops systemic illness and rash after being started on a new anticonvulsant.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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FDA Okays Oral Formulation of Perampanel (Fycompa)

Perampanel (Fycompa) will now be available in oral suspension formulation for partial-onset seizures with or without secondary generalized seizures, as well as primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures for patients aged 12 years and older.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Prescribing sodium oxybate for narcolepsy

Narcolepsy affects around 4 in 10 000 people, making it about one quarter as common as multiple sclerosis in the United Kingdom.1 Its cardinal features are excessive daytime sleepiness causing frequent, irresistible naps; cataplexy, leading to collapse, embarrassment, and sometimes injury; and marked disturbance of nocturnal sleep. It is usually due to a specific deficiency of the hypothalamic neurotransmitter hypocretin and most often starts in the teens, probably as the result of an autoimmune process. Narcolepsy is far more than an occasional dose of sleepiness: it is a lifelong, pervasive, and potentially disabling disorder with a similar effect on quality of life to treatment resistant epilepsy.2  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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6

Prescribing sodium oxybate for narcolepsy

Narcolepsy affects around 4 in 10 000 people, making it about one quarter as common as multiple sclerosis in the United Kingdom.1 Its cardinal features are excessive daytime sleepiness causing frequent, irresistible naps; cataplexy, leading to collapse, embarrassment, and sometimes injury; and marked disturbance of nocturnal sleep. It is usually due to a specific deficiency of the hypothalamic neurotransmitter hypocretin and most often starts in the teens, probably as the result of an autoimmune process. Narcolepsy is far more than an occasional dose of sleepiness: it is a lifelong, pervasive, and potentially disabling disorder with a similar effect on quality of life to treatment resistant epilepsy.2  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
Preview
0
6

Prescribing sodium oxybate for narcolepsy

Narcolepsy affects around 4 in 10 000 people, making it about one quarter as common as multiple sclerosis in the United Kingdom.1 Its cardinal features are excessive daytime sleepiness causing frequent, irresistible naps; cataplexy, leading to collapse, embarrassment, and sometimes injury; and marked disturbance of nocturnal sleep. It is usually due to a specific deficiency of the hypothalamic neurotransmitter hypocretin and most often starts in the teens, probably as the result of an autoimmune process. Narcolepsy is far more than an occasional dose of sleepiness: it is a lifelong, pervasive, and potentially disabling disorder with a similar effect on quality of life to treatment resistant epilepsy.2  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
Preview
0
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Everolimus Data for Seizures in Tuberous Sclerosis 'Exciting'

The new results may open the door to eventually being able to treat epilepsy, not just seizures, researchers say.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Once-Daily Epilepsy Drug Equivalent to Twice-Daily Drug

A new study shows eslicarbazepine acetate is equivalent in efficacy to twice-daily carbamazepine monotherapy.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Epilepsy Appears Not to Interfere With Conception

New 'myth-busting' data suggest that women with epilepsy are just as likely to get pregnant as healthy controls, if they choose to.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Cannabidiol for Treatment-Resistant Epilepsy

Dr Jacobs reviews the results of an open-label trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of cannabidiol in patients with treatment-resistant epilepsy.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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Fever with seizure and confusion

A 41 year old previously healthy man presented with a six day history of fever, headache, and vomiting, followed by two episodes of staring spells and unresponsiveness and secondarily generalised tonic-clonic seizures. In the emergency department he was restless, inattentive, and not oriented to time, place, and person (Glasgow coma score 10/15; best eye opening response (E): 3; best motor response (M): 5 and best verbal response (V):2). He had neck stiffness; Kernig’s sign was positive and his ocular fundi were normal. He had no limb weakness or ataxia and deep tendon reflexes and plantar reflexes were normal. He tested negative for HIV1/2 antigen and antibody. His blood coagulation profile and platelet count were normal. An initial unenhanced computed tomogram of the brain found no contraindications for lumbar puncture. Analysis of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) showed glucose 3.4 mmol/L (reference range 2.2-3.9 mmol/L; corresponding blood glucose was 5.8 mmol/L), protein 2.59 g/L (0.15-0.45 g/L), 450×106 white blood cells/L (100% lymphocytes; 0-5×106), and 40×106 red blood cells/L. Gram staining of the CSF was negative and bacterial culture was sterile. A confirmatory microbiological test was performed on his CSF and computed tomography of the brain repeated the second week after the onset of symptoms (fig 1⇓).  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago