New to Meducation?
Sign up
Already signed up? Log In

Category

Preview
0
3

Carbamazepine versus phenytoin monotherapy (single drug treatment) for epilepsy | Cochrane

Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder in which recurrent seizures are caused by abnormal electrical discharges from the brain. We studied two types of epileptic seizures in this review; generalised onset seizures in which electrical discharges begin in one part of the brain and move throughout the brain, and partial onset seizures in which the seizure is generated in, and affects one part of the brain (the whole hemisphere of the brain or part of a lobe of the brain). For around 70% of people with epilepsy, generalised onset or partial onset seizures can be controlled by a single antiepileptic drug. Worldwide, phenytoin and carbamazepine are commonly used antiepileptic drugs, however carbamazepine is used more commonly in the USA and Europe due to concerns over side effects associated with phenytoin. Phenytoin is still commonly used in developing countries in Africa, Asia and South America due to the low cost of the drug.  
cochrane.org
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
23

Febrile seizures

Some children with recurrent or prolonged febrile seizures may have some memory impairment. It is not yet clear if this is permanent or if they “catch up” in time  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
17

Febrile seizures

Some children with recurrent or prolonged febrile seizures may have some memory impairment. It is not yet clear if this is permanent or if they “catch up” in time  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
5

Venlafaxine for neuropathic pain in adults | Cochrane

Neuropathic pain is pain that arises from damaged nerves. It is different in nature than pain that arises from damaged tissue, such as a cut, although that type of pain is also carried along nerves. Drugs that are commonly used to treat pain, such as paracetamol, ibuprofen, or morphine, are not very good at treating neuropathic pain. However, other drugs, such as gabapentin, which are also used to prevent or treat epilepsy (fits), do appear to be of some benefit in treating neuropathic pain. There is also a great deal of interest in using antidepressant drugs to treat neuropathic pain. This does not imply that the person with neuropathic pain is depressed, but simply that these drugs may have benefits in neuropathic pain. However, while some doctors prescribe antidepressants in people with neuropathic pain, their benefits have not been confirmed in large clinical trials.  
cochrane.org
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
0

Pharmacological interventions for epilepsy in people with intellectual disability | Cochrane

Epilepsy is a common condition. Approximately 3% of the general population are diagnosed with epilepsy at some point in their life (Rugg-Gunn 2012). However, epilepsy is significantly more common in people with intellectual disabilities where estimates range from 14% to 44% (Bowley 2000). People with intellectual disability and epilepsy often do not respond as well to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) as the general population and behavioural disturbances are frequent. We review the use of AEDs in this population.  
cochrane.org
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
0

Respiratory tract infection associated with seizures

A two year old girl presented to her local hospital with breathing difficulties. She was diagnosed with virus induced wheeze. On day one of admission she deteriorated and developed respiratory failure, which required ventilatory support and transfer to our paediatric intensive care unit. Figure 1⇓ shows her chest radiograph on arrival. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) panel performed on respiratory secretions identified a micro-organism. She was successfully extubated to nasal cannula oxygen two days later and transferred to a paediatric ward. Four hours after transfer she had a prolonged tonic-clonic convulsion. Owing to profound respiratory depression after two doses of lorazepam she required re-intubation and transfer back to the paediatric intensive care unit.  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
1

Respiratory tract infection associated with seizures

A two year old girl presented to her local hospital with breathing difficulties. She was diagnosed with virus induced wheeze. On day one of admission she deteriorated and developed respiratory failure, which required ventilatory support and transfer to our paediatric intensive care unit. Figure 1⇓ shows her chest radiograph on arrival. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) panel performed on respiratory secretions identified a micro-organism. She was successfully extubated to nasal cannula oxygen two days later and transferred to a paediatric ward. Four hours after transfer she had a prolonged tonic-clonic convulsion. Owing to profound respiratory depression after two doses of lorazepam she required re-intubation and transfer back to the paediatric intensive care unit.  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
0

Non-pharmacological interventions for people with epilepsy and intellectual disabilities | Cochrane

Epilepsy is a neurological condition characterised by involuntary activity of the brain, which manifests in seizures. The rate of epilepsy in people with intellectual diabilities is significantly higher than in the general population. Epilepsy in this population is often less responsive to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and is associated with higher rates of morbidity and mortality. One relevant study comparing two surgical procedures has been included in this review. This study found that anterior corpus callosotomy (a procedure in which a section of the corpus callosum is severed) with anterior temporal lobectomy (a procedure in which part of the temporal lobe is removed) is more effective than anterior temporal lobectomy alone in improving quality of life and performance on IQ tests among people with epilepsy and intellectual disabilities. No support was found for a relative benefit of either procedure for improved seizure control. This review accentuates the lack of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating non-pharmacological interventions for people with epilepsy and intellectual disabilities. Given the prevalence and nature of epilepsy in this population, well-designed RCTs are needed to ascertain the effects of non-pharmacological interventions on seizure and behavioural outcomes in people with intellectual disabilities. However, good quality evidence derived from RCTs including the non-intellectually disabled should be assessed for side effects and efficacy before such studies are undertaken.  
cochrane.org
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
0

Modified Atkins Diet Limits Seizures in Refractory Epilepsy

A ketogenic diet, a modified version of the Atkins diet, has been used to help control epilepsy in children. It now has shown efficacy in adults with drug-refractory disease, a study shows.  
medscape.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
10

Stratospheric Rise of Medical Marijuana in Epilepsy

An 'interesting mix of science, politics, and social phenomena' has moved medical marijuana to the forefront of treatment for severe drug-resistant epilepsy, says the author of a new review article on the topic.  
medscape.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
1

What Meds Could Help Prevent a Recurrent Eclamptic Seizure in a Pregnant Woman?

A 20-year-old G1 at 36 weeks is being monitored for preeclampsia. What medication is recommended for the prevention of a recurrent eclamptic seizure?  
medscape.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
0

Heart Rate-Triggered Vagus Stimulator Offers Seizure Control

A vagus nerve stimulator triggered by the increase in heart rate before a seizure offers patients with drug-refractory epilepsy better seizure control and improved quality of life, a study shows.  
medscape.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
0

Patient-centered Approaches to Managing Seizure Clusters CME/CE

This activity is intended for neurologists, primary care providers, emergency medicine physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and other clinicians involved in the management of seizure clusters  
medscape.org
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
0

Focal Seizure on the right hand

Prepare for USMLE,UK,CANADIAN,AUSTRALIAN, NURSING & OTHER MEDICAL BOARD examinations around the globe with us.Understand the basics, concepts and how to answ...  
youtube.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
0

The Art and Science of Diagnosing Seizures CME

The goal of this activity is to improve physicians’ competency and confidence in diagnosing patients with epileptic seizures.  
medscape.org
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
7

Switching AED Forms Improves Seizure Control for ID Patients

Seizure control improved by 50% when patients with epilepsy and intellectual disability were switched from a liquid to a granule form of levetiracetam, a study shows. Gut absorption may be the reason.  
medscape.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
0

Independent Review Excludes Many Patients From AED Trial

In a first for an epilepsy drug trial, an external review found many patients included were ineligible because of misdiagnosis or insufficient data, raising questions about past trial results.  
medscape.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
1

Recognizing and managing paradoxical reactions from benzodiazepines & propofol

. A perplexing case . A young man with a history of seizures and alcoholism presented with a generalized seizure.  His seizure responded to lorazepam, but  
pulmcrit.org
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
0

FDA Revokes Approval for Sun Pharma's Seizure Drug Over Compliance Issues

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has revoked an approval issued in March to India's Sun Pharma Advanced Research Company Ltd (SPARC) to launch a drug for seizures, citing manufacturing quality problems at its production site.  
medscape.com
almost 5 years ago