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Einstein-Cardozo Certificate and Master's Program in Bioethics: Reunion 2014

http://www.einstein.yu.edu - Tia Powell, M.D., director of the Montefiore Einstein Center for Bioethics and the Einstein-Cardozo Bioethics Graduate Studies, ...  
YouTube
over 6 years ago
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Einstein-Cardozo M.B.E. Faculty Interview: Dr. Tia Powell

http://www.einstein.yu.edu/bioethics - Einstein-Cardozo M.B.E. program director Tia Powell, M.D., explains how her passion for bioethics helps influence the ...  
YouTube
over 6 years ago
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Einstein-Cardozo M.B.E.: Bioethics For The Real World

http://www.einstein.yu.edu/bioethics - The Einstein-Cardozo Master in Bioethics (M.B.E.) draws upon a unique collaboration of Albert Einstein College of Medi...  
YouTube
over 6 years ago
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I was told to approve a lethal injection, but it violates my basic medical ethics | Marc Stern

Marc Stern: We risk botched executions so long as they are conducted in a scientific vacuum and medical professionals operate devoid of any moral compass  
the Guardian
about 6 years ago
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Presumed consent for organ donation

Tony Calland, Chair of the BMA's Medical Ethics Committee and Muslim Healthcare Student Network Chair Obadah Ghannam talk to BMA News Reporter, Anita Wilkinson about ethical and religious aspects of introducing presumed consent for organ donation - http://www.bma.org.uk/ethics/organ_transplantation_donation/index.jsp  
audioBoom
about 6 years ago
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Journal of Medical Ethics podcast: Infanticide is sometimes justified.

Stream Journal of Medical Ethics podcast: Infanticide is sometimes justified. by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
almost 6 years ago
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Journal of Medical Ethics podcast: Infanticide is never justified.

Stream Journal of Medical Ethics podcast: Infanticide is never justified. by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
almost 6 years ago
Www.bmj
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Do we need a new approach to making vaccine recommendations?

Controversy about the evidence, economics, ethics, lobbying, and decision making surrounding a new vaccine for serogroup B meningococcal disease should trigger change in the way we develop recommendations for new vaccines say Natasha Crowcroft and colleagues  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
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The BioPsychoSocial Model of Disease comes to life

The biopsychosocial model of disease existed in my notes... an excuse to get out the colouring crayons and draw a diagram, but ultimately another collection of facts that needed to be digested then regurgitated in the summer exams, something to be fitted in around learning about the important stuff - the science. But the biopsychosocial model has come alive for me recently, now I realise what an impact the later two components, psychological and social, can have on patients. As a former medical student and now full time patient, the model really means something to me now. In the 1977 paper in Science, George Engel introduced the biopsychosocial model: "The dominant model of disease today is biomedical, and it leaves no room within it's framework for the social, psychological and behavioural dimensions of illness. A biopsychosocial model is proposed that provides a blueprint for research, a framework for teaching and a design for action in the real world of health care." Following some conversations on Twitter recently and from my own experience at medical school and now as a patient, I wanted to explore my thoughts on this model. Twitter, in the wonderful way it does, recently introduced me to the Disabled Medic blog, which among many other great posts, has also explored the biopsychosocial model, and I would recommend a read. The biopsychosocial model shows the influence that emotions and social circumstances have on physical health, which is important. But while conversations about the model focus on the way it can be used by healthcare professionals (very important!), it needs emphasising that the model can provide a framework for patients to look at/after themselves. The model highlights the psychological and social causes of disease, but more optimistically, it can show that there are a range of treatments for disease, from the medical to the social and psychological. A diagnosis of a long-term health conditions is often simultaneous with loss of control. There are limitations to the success of medications, treatments and surgeries. And in receiving these, we are relatively passive as patients, no matter how engaged we are. The biopsychosocial model looks at our biological, psychological and social needs, and how these factors influence our overall health. Establishing that these factors affect our health is only the first step. As patients, when psychological and social factors are brought in to the equation, it becomes clear that we ourselves have some power to help ourselves. By framing our health in this more holistic way, as patients we are not as powerless as suggested by the medical model. Through self-management we can make positive changes to our own psychological and social situations, which can in turn benefit our physical biological health. To return to the traditional ground of the model - healthcare professionals.... One strength of the model is that it places psychology side beside its (generally considered) more superior counter-part, biology. I hope that by seeing the biopsychosocial model in action, physicians can appreciate the detrimental psychological impact of a diagnosis, and the assumption of "it is all in the mind" can fall by the way side. By integrating all three elements, the model shows that neither is independent of the others, so it can't be all in the mind, because other factors, biological or social, will be involved to some degree. For me personally, the biopsychosocial model makes me look at what a 'life' is. One of the attractions of medicine is saving lives. Without getting too deeply into philosophy or ethics, I just want to explore for a second what saving a life really means for me, as a patient. I still believe that A&E staff heroically save lives. But I have come to realise that a life is more than a swiggly line on a heart rate monitor. My counsellor has been just as heroic in saving my life, through addressing my emotions. My life is now something I can live, rather than endure. With saving lives being a key (and honourable) motivation among medical staff, it is important that we can allow them to save lives as often as possible, and in many different ways. It may not always be through emergency treatment in resuscitation, but if we embrace the biopsychosical model, they can save lives in many more ways. When there is a limit to the effectiveness of the biological approaches to an ill person, and they can't be returned to the land of the healthy, medical science becomes unstuck. Within the biopsychosocial model, the issue of doctors not being able to do anything is slightly less. As I mentioned in my post about making the transition from medical student to patient, I went to medical school because I wanted to make people better. But I was only being taught one way to make people better - drugs and surgery. If we really embraces the biopsychosocial model, doctors could make a difference, even if their standard tools of drugs aren't available because they could turn to psychological and social support. This isn't to say that all clinicians have to be counsellors or social workers - far from it. But an awareness and appreciation of their contribution to the management of a patient is important, as well as an understanding of the basic principles and skills such as motivational interviewing. In 2013, I don't think I can talk about social in this context without mentioning social media. It was not was Engel originally meant in 1977, but social media has become a vital social tool for patients to manage their health. Ignoring anxieties and postural problems associated with sitting at a screen seeing everyone else's photo-shopped lives, it is undeniable that social media is a big and good resource that can empower patients to take responsibility and manage their own health. To see the best examples in action, take a look at Michael Seres and his blog, Being a Patient Isn't Easy to see a whole new meaning to the social in biopsychosocial! I am still very grateful for the biological expertise of my medical team. Don't get me wrong - it's a good place to start and I wouldn't be here writing this post today if it wasn't for the biological support. But with chronic illness, when you are past the dramatic relapses, the biological isn't enough.... The biology has allowed me to live, but its the psychological and social support I have received that has allowed me to live. Anya de Iongh @anyadei www.thepatientpatient2011.blogspot.co.uk  
Anya de Iongh
over 7 years ago
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Emergency Medicine Literature of Note: Rampant Underreported Research Misconduct

Ryan,Nice choice of article. I think people would be genuinely staggerred to believe how easy it would be for one to fabricate data. In general, there are no "journal police." This says nothing of the inappropriate spin a sponsored trial might undertake with appropriate data.Brian  
emlitofnote.com
over 5 years ago
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Declaration of Torrejón

 
drive.google.com
over 5 years ago
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Abortion Care

This comprehensive review of the emotive and often controversial topic of abortion provides clinicians with a multidisciplinary focus on abortion services, discussing clinical topics in their sociological, legal and ethical context. It is particularly timely as novel methods of service delivery make this vital resource more accessible, allowing abortion to be performed in community settings. Topics include medical and surgical methods of abortion, ultrasound scanning, pain control, complications, and abortion in women with medical conditions, as well as ethics, stigma, and human rights. Written by leading authorities in their subject areas, Abortion Care is essential reading for medical and nursing specialists and forms a useful resource in the delivery of graduate courses in the fields of obstetrics and gynaecology and sexual and reproductive healthcare. It is also of interest to professionals involved in planning, delivering and managing women's health services, including counsellors, service managers and public health specialists.  
books.google.co.uk
over 5 years ago
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BMA - Medical Students Ethics - Key Concepts | British Medical Association

Key concepts in medical ethics - the student ethics toolkit providing practical answers to ethical problems  
bma.org.uk
about 5 years ago
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Ethics of using three people's DNA to create one baby - BBC News

Mitochondrial replacement may seem an obscure medical subject but it is a technique which has profound implications for society and for the couples it could benefit. The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority has begun a public consultation. So what are the ethical issues at stake?  
bbc.co.uk
about 5 years ago
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Guest Post: Agree to disagree? Why not? | Practical Ethics

Pedro Jesus Perez Zafrilla. (University of Valencia) In a previous post on this blog, David Aldridge questions the social convention of ending arguments by “agreeing to disagree.”, arguing that doing so “ends the dialogue at precisely the point where what is really at issue is beginning to emerge” . He also questions the motivations of those who seek to end an argument by offering to "agree to disagree" However, I think agreeing to disagree is a good idea and I will try to argue why. Debating could be characterized by three features: a context of disagreement, open-minded participants, and an expectation that one can rationally convince his/her interlocutor. Then, people who debate do so because they believe that agreement is possible. The achievement of agreement is the aim of  dialogue. Nevertheless, the desire to reach agreement shouldn’t lead us to forget that debate is fruitful only under certain conditions. Some of them include limitations of time and the number of participants, because the decision must be made, or agreement reached, within a reasonable span of time. But there are also other limitations in the debating process. We might begin with the expectation that one can rationally convince one’s interlocutor about the rightness of one’s position but we reach difficulties when incommensurable views are confronted. Some examples are found in debates on taxes, euthanasia or models of education. Here what is morally significant for some persons is not so for others. So, concepts such as “a dignified life” or “quality of education” have different meanings for each side of the debate. Accordingly, the arguments one side presents will not be convincing to the other side. In these cases, the expectation that one can rationally convince one’s interlocutor will generate polarization processes toward antagonist positions (see Haidt, J. “The Emotional Dog and its Rational Tail. A Social Intuitionist approach to Moral judgement”, Psychological Review, 108, 2001, p.823). Even more, each person will think that his/her interlocutor is not morally motivated (Schulz, Kathryn. Being wrong. Adventures in the margin of error. London: Portobello Books, 2010, pp.107-110). In that context, far from achieving agreement, debate leads to disagreement. For that reason, I think the more reasonable option to avoid this turn is to seek points of convergence between the interlocutors, whilst recognising the deep differences that remain between them, as Gutmann and Thompson suggest (Gutmann, A. and Thompson, D. Democracy and disagreement. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1996, pp.84-85). However, this recognition of the limitations of the agreement that can be reached doesn’t mean that the dialogue has failed. On the contrary, it is the most suitable way to maintain the effectiveness of dialogue and arrive at agreement. I think so for three reasons: the first is that agreeing to disagree avoids the frustration when our interlocutor doesn’t recognize the rightness of our arguments. Second, and as a consequence of the first, agreeing to disagree enables us to continue recognizing our interlocutor as an open-minded person. Finally, it enables us to set more realistic goals for deliberation. The opposite, blindly trusting the open-mindedness of our interlocutor, as Aldridge argues, seems a to be overly optimistic.. Then, answering to Aldridge’s question about what could motivate an offer to agree to disagree, an appropriate reason to offer to agree to disagree would be an awareness of the limitations that debate has in contexts of deep disagreement.  
blog.practicalethics.ox.ac.uk
about 5 years ago
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Community Voices in Medical Ethics: Decision Making for Unknown & Vulnerable Patients: A Survey

We are a diverse, Boston-based group of citizens providing feedback on medical ethics policies to the Harvard teaching hospitals. Community Voices and its affiliate Community Ethics Committee give the multiple communities of Boston a voice in the care they rely on. Investigate our blog, read our reports, and add your voice!  
medicalethicsandme.org
about 5 years ago
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Some new doctors are working 30-hour shifts at hospitals around the U.S.

A study of the practice, banned in 2011, is reviving questions about ethics and patient safety.  
washingtonpost.com
almost 5 years ago
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Discussion: a price for advances in medicine. Phase I clinical trial fail in France

Let me suggest a topic for discussion that might be a bit provocative. It's about the prices that sometimes we have to pay for advances in medicine. Ist phase clinical trial of a new painkiller drug manufactured by Bial (Portugal) failed with one man brain-dead and another five ones in critical state with neurologic symptoms, three of them are suspected to have irreversable changes in their CNS. [Links to news articles below] What is your opinion: who carries responsibility for these cases? Bial, Biotrial clinic that carried out the trial or maybe somone else involved? What kind of responsibility must it be provided the fact people involved in the study are volunteers and must have been consulted about specificity and all the issues that can arise in phase I clinical trials? Could there take place unproperly done preclinical trial? What do you think about it? ||You can follow these links to get more information about the case: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-35337671 http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/857379  
Alina Ivaniuk
almost 5 years ago
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Get Through Clinical Finals: A Toolkit for OSCEs

There's no getting away from the fact that finals are tricky. Becoming a confident House Officer involves not only medicine, surgery and psychiatry, but also communication, ethics, and practical skills. Get Through Clinical Finals: A Toolkit for OSCEs is intended to help identify these areas, to show the reader how to avoid the common pitfalls and, by combining such information, how to successfully mind that gap.Forming part of the best selling and well respected 'Get Through' series, this book aims to provide medical students with practical advice on how to revise and pass their OSCEs (Observed Structured Clinical Examinations). Featuring numerous practice scenarios in all the major specialties, Get Through Clinical Finals contains the information that finalists are expected to know but are rarely taught. Written by recently qualified doctors, this is the ideal toolkit in the run up to clinical finals.  
books.google.co.uk
over 4 years ago