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Journal of Medical Ethics podcast: Infanticide is sometimes justified.

Stream Journal of Medical Ethics podcast: Infanticide is sometimes justified. by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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Journal of Medical Ethics podcast: Infanticide is never justified.

Stream Journal of Medical Ethics podcast: Infanticide is never justified. by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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119

Emergency Medicine Literature of Note: Rampant Underreported Research Misconduct

Ryan,Nice choice of article. I think people would be genuinely staggerred to believe how easy it would be for one to fabricate data. In general, there are no "journal police." This says nothing of the inappropriate spin a sponsored trial might undertake with appropriate data.Brian  
emlitofnote.com
over 3 years ago
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Ebola and ethics: autopsy of a failure

The current epidemic of Ebola virus disease has attracted medical ethics commentators like bees to a honey pot. No previous infectious disease epidemic has elicited such a flurry of articles on the ethical challenges associated with infection control and treatment in such a short time. Has this been of any use?  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
Www.bmj
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Ebola and ethics: autopsy of a failure

The current epidemic of Ebola virus disease has attracted medical ethics commentators like bees to a honey pot. No previous infectious disease epidemic has elicited such a flurry of articles on the ethical challenges associated with infection control and treatment in such a short time. Has this been of any use?  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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Declaration of Torrejón

 
drive.google.com
over 3 years ago
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Ethical issues associated with fertility treatment

These slides are from a talk I was invited to give at the Teacher Scientist Network (www.tsn.org.uk) Master Class on Reproductive Technologies. This turns out…  
slideshare.net
over 3 years ago
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Abortion Care

This comprehensive review of the emotive and often controversial topic of abortion provides clinicians with a multidisciplinary focus on abortion services, discussing clinical topics in their sociological, legal and ethical context. It is particularly timely as novel methods of service delivery make this vital resource more accessible, allowing abortion to be performed in community settings. Topics include medical and surgical methods of abortion, ultrasound scanning, pain control, complications, and abortion in women with medical conditions, as well as ethics, stigma, and human rights. Written by leading authorities in their subject areas, Abortion Care is essential reading for medical and nursing specialists and forms a useful resource in the delivery of graduate courses in the fields of obstetrics and gynaecology and sexual and reproductive healthcare. It is also of interest to professionals involved in planning, delivering and managing women's health services, including counsellors, service managers and public health specialists.  
books.google.co.uk
over 3 years ago
Www.bmj
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Complexities in responding to the Ebola epidemic

I disagree with Gericke in his editorial on Ebola and ethics.1 Because there was no vaccine, health workers at the front line were desperate for an effective response, so the focus on specific treatments was highly appropriate. If an effective treatment had been found, people would have seen hospitals as places to be cured rather than …  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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Freeze sperm at 18, bioethicist urges men - BBC News

The sperm of all 18-year-olds should be frozen on the NHS to reduce the risks associated with being an older father, a bioethicist argues.  
bbc.co.uk
over 3 years ago
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What Doctors Can Learn from Journalists About Ethics in Medical Reporting | Blog

As a physician who regularly discusses health news online and in the media, I find myself in a very fortunate position — I am able to quickly reach vast numbers of people and provide them with credible (and hopefully impactful) information on health and wellness. Because of this, just as in clinical interactions, I know I must put patients first, choosing my words carefully so that I can provide people with facts they need to better understand their disease state and treatment options. I also know that I must be aware of the fact that as opposed to clinical encounters, there is no opportunity for patient interaction. What I say must be geared toward stimulating further conversation between members of my audience and their own private physicians. Statements must be clear and evidence-based, and stories must be reported without bias.  
medium.com
about 3 years ago
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Pre-eclampsia - Case Video - Ministry of Ethics .co.uk

Medical ethics and law revision notes for free, with MCQs, EMQs, animated videos, clinical scenarios, lecture notes and discussion forums. Discuss with senior lecturers, and download resources they upload  
ministryofethics.co.uk
about 3 years ago
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BMA - Medical Students Ethics - Key Concepts | British Medical Association

Key concepts in medical ethics - the student ethics toolkit providing practical answers to ethical problems  
bma.org.uk
about 3 years ago
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Ethics of using three people's DNA to create one baby - BBC News

Mitochondrial replacement may seem an obscure medical subject but it is a technique which has profound implications for society and for the couples it could benefit. The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority has begun a public consultation. So what are the ethical issues at stake?  
bbc.co.uk
about 3 years ago
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Ethical issues and addiction. - PubMed - NCBI

The epidemic of substance abuse continues to pose a significant challenge to clinicians nationwide. Although there is a tendency to simply associate drug abuse with poverty, the problem affects every social stratum gender and race; and pregnant women are no exception. Caring for pregnant, substance-using women and their infants presents complex legal and ethical issues. Debate is ongoing about whether criminal penalties should be imposed on women based solely on their use of alcohol and other drugs during pregnancy. Furthermore, controversies persist about the rights and wishes of pregnant women versus the interests of their fetuses. For health professionals, conflict arises when the pregnant woman chooses behaviors that have the potential to harm the developing fetus. The ethical dilemma arises from competing autonomy-based and beneficence-based obligations to the maternal-fetal dyad. This chapter explores the ethics-based conflicts in the delivery of health care to drug abusing pregnant women.  
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
about 3 years ago
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Guest Post: Agree to disagree? Why not? | Practical Ethics

Pedro Jesus Perez Zafrilla. (University of Valencia) In a previous post on this blog, David Aldridge questions the social convention of ending arguments by “agreeing to disagree.”, arguing that doing so “ends the dialogue at precisely the point where what is really at issue is beginning to emerge” . He also questions the motivations of those who seek to end an argument by offering to "agree to disagree" However, I think agreeing to disagree is a good idea and I will try to argue why. Debating could be characterized by three features: a context of disagreement, open-minded participants, and an expectation that one can rationally convince his/her interlocutor. Then, people who debate do so because they believe that agreement is possible. The achievement of agreement is the aim of  dialogue. Nevertheless, the desire to reach agreement shouldn’t lead us to forget that debate is fruitful only under certain conditions. Some of them include limitations of time and the number of participants, because the decision must be made, or agreement reached, within a reasonable span of time. But there are also other limitations in the debating process. We might begin with the expectation that one can rationally convince one’s interlocutor about the rightness of one’s position but we reach difficulties when incommensurable views are confronted. Some examples are found in debates on taxes, euthanasia or models of education. Here what is morally significant for some persons is not so for others. So, concepts such as “a dignified life” or “quality of education” have different meanings for each side of the debate. Accordingly, the arguments one side presents will not be convincing to the other side. In these cases, the expectation that one can rationally convince one’s interlocutor will generate polarization processes toward antagonist positions (see Haidt, J. “The Emotional Dog and its Rational Tail. A Social Intuitionist approach to Moral judgement”, Psychological Review, 108, 2001, p.823). Even more, each person will think that his/her interlocutor is not morally motivated (Schulz, Kathryn. Being wrong. Adventures in the margin of error. London: Portobello Books, 2010, pp.107-110). In that context, far from achieving agreement, debate leads to disagreement. For that reason, I think the more reasonable option to avoid this turn is to seek points of convergence between the interlocutors, whilst recognising the deep differences that remain between them, as Gutmann and Thompson suggest (Gutmann, A. and Thompson, D. Democracy and disagreement. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1996, pp.84-85). However, this recognition of the limitations of the agreement that can be reached doesn’t mean that the dialogue has failed. On the contrary, it is the most suitable way to maintain the effectiveness of dialogue and arrive at agreement. I think so for three reasons: the first is that agreeing to disagree avoids the frustration when our interlocutor doesn’t recognize the rightness of our arguments. Second, and as a consequence of the first, agreeing to disagree enables us to continue recognizing our interlocutor as an open-minded person. Finally, it enables us to set more realistic goals for deliberation. The opposite, blindly trusting the open-mindedness of our interlocutor, as Aldridge argues, seems a to be overly optimistic.. Then, answering to Aldridge’s question about what could motivate an offer to agree to disagree, an appropriate reason to offer to agree to disagree would be an awareness of the limitations that debate has in contexts of deep disagreement.  
blog.practicalethics.ox.ac.uk
about 3 years ago
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Community Voices in Medical Ethics: Decision Making for Unknown & Vulnerable Patients: A Survey

We are a diverse, Boston-based group of citizens providing feedback on medical ethics policies to the Harvard teaching hospitals. Community Voices and its affiliate Community Ethics Committee give the multiple communities of Boston a voice in the care they rely on. Investigate our blog, read our reports, and add your voice!  
medicalethicsandme.org
about 3 years ago
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Shrink Rap: Does Watch-Your-Words Political Correctness in Universities Contribute to Mental Illness?

Dinah, ClinkShrink, & Roy produce Shrink Rap: a blog by Psychiatrists for Psychiatrists. A place to talk; no one has to listen. All patient vignettes are confabulated; the psychiatrists, however, are mostly real. --Topics include psychotherapy, humor, depression, bipolar, anxiety, schizophrenia, medications, ethics, psychopharmacology, forensic and correctional psychiatry, psychology, mental health, chocolate, and emotional support ducks. Don't ask. (It's not Shrink Wrap.)  
psychiatrist-blog.blogspot.co.uk
about 3 years ago
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BMA - GMC Unable to Act Over Revalidation Conflict of Interest Claim - 2013 - August | British Medical Association

GMC says accreditation scheme is a 'matter for the faculty' of occupational medicine  
bma.org.uk
about 3 years ago