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Foo20151013 2023 x3l6t5?1444774041
5
2691

Anatomy For Life: Calling all Bio / Medically Minded Artists and Students

Introduction Hello and welcome. If you are one of the few who have been following my blog since last year then you may be aware of a certain promise that has yet to be fulfilled... That promise is of a new set of schematic images similar to my Arterial Schematic that seems to have gained some popularity on Meducation. The truth of the matter is that I have actually been working on a separate project since finishing my finals. This separate project has involved making the website and doing some of the design work for 'Anatomy For Life,' an exciting medically-related charity art auction and exhibition. The event is due to be held in Brighton (venue TBC) during National Transplant week (8-14th July) to help raise money for organ donation and body donation via the charity; 'Live Life Then Give Life'. Where you come in... The exciting thing about the Anatomy For Life (AFL) art auction is that we are looking for everyone and anyone to donate. It doesn't matter if you get usually get paid £1,000 per drawing or if you haven't picked up a paintbrush since school. Each and every donation will be displayed on a level playing field, giving the unique opportunity for amateurs to pitch up against the professional medical illustrators out there and vice versa! As long as the artwork donated fits the criteria below you have free reign: Artwork submitted must be (at least loosely) associated with the 'Anatomy' theme. Artwork submitted must be on roughly A6 card (4"x6"). The AFL team recommend a paper weight of 250gsm or above. Create your artwork using any art media you choose on/with the A6 card. Sign the BACK of your masterpiece, but not the front* Donations should be received by the 17th June 2013 *The AFL team will be exhibiting the art work shown and running the auction anonymously. Artists will not be attributed to their donations until after the event via our online gallery. Once you have completed you artwork(s) you should fill out our downloadable information form and provide us with your name, a short bio about you and what inspired your donated artwork. You can also let us know if you want the AFL team to e-mail you a certificate in recognition of your contribution! Some Context... Organ donation is the act of donating ones organs or tissues to help save someone else's life after your own passing. One person can donate enough organs to save several peoples lives, which in the minds of many is a truly admirable feat! Body donation usually refers to the act of donating ones own body to medical education, so that students may continue to learn the real-life anatomy that forms part of becoming a competent doctor or surgeon. Organ donation is currently on the rise in the U.K thanks to the fantastic work of the Organ Donor Register and the charities that support organ donation such as 'Live Life Then Give Life'. However, the U.K still has one of the highest family-refusal rates in Europe for organ donation. It is hoped that by raising awareness of the benefits of organ donation this refusal rate can be reduced either by more people being registered organ donors or by families having more access to information about the topic. We really want to hear from you... If you have something you think might benefit our project please do let us know! Go To Our Main Website Donate Artwork to Us! Tweet to Us on Twitter Like Us on Facebook Thats all folks, LARF  
Dr. Luke Farmery
over 7 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 10r211s?1444774270
5
107

Why can't we have a NICE'er EU?

The book of the week this week has been Chris Patten’s “Not quite the diplomat” – part autobiography, half recent history and a third political philosophy text. It is a fascinating insight into the international community of the last 3 decades. The book has really challenged some of my political beliefs – which I thought were pretty unshakeable – and one above all others, the EU. I read this book to help me decide who I should vote for in the upcoming MEP elections. I have to make a confession, my political views are on the right of the centre and I have always been quite a strong “Eurosceptic”. Although recently, I have found myself drifting further and further into the camp of “we must pull out of Europe at all costs” but Mr Patten’s arguments and insights have definitely made me question this stance. With the European Parliamentary elections coming up, I thought it might be an interesting time to put some ideas out there for discussion. From a young age, I have always been of the opinion that Great Britain is a world leading country, a still great power, one of the best countries in the world - democratic, tolerant, fair, sensible - and that we don’t need anyone else’s “help” or interference in how our country is run. I believe that British voters should have a democratic input on the rules that govern them. To borrow an American phrase “No taxation without representation!” I believe that democracy is not perfect but that it is the best system of government that humans have been able to develop. For all of its faults, voters normally swing back to the centre ground eventually and any silly policies can be undone. This system has inherently more checks and balances than any meritocracy, oligarchy or bureaucracy (taking it literally to mean being ruled by unelected officials). This is one of my major objections to how the European Union currently works. For all intents and purposes, it is not democratic. Institutions of the EU include the European Commission, the Council of the European Union, the European Council, the Court of Justice of the European Union, the European Central Bank, the Court of Auditors, and the European Parliament. Only one of these institutions is elected by the European demos (the parliament) and that institution doesn’t really make any changes to any policies – “the rubber stamp brigade”. The European Council is made up of the President of the European Council (Unelected), President of the European commission (Unelected) and the heads of the member states (elected) and is where quite a lot of the "major" policies come from but not all of the read tape (the European Commission and Parliament). I am happy to be proved wrong but it just seems that the EU, as a whole, is made up of unelected officials who increasing try to make rules that apply to all 28 member states without any consent from the voters in those states – it looks like the rule of “b-euro-crats” (bureaucrats – this version has far too many vowels for a dyslexic person to use). A beurocratic rule which many of us do not agree with but seemingly have to succumb to, a good example for medics is the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) which means that junior doctors only get paid for working 48h a week when they may spend many, many more hours in work. The EWTD has also made training a lot more difficult for many junior doctors and has many implications for how the health service is now run. Is it right that this law was imposed on us without our consent? If we imposed a treatment on a patient without their consent then we would be in very big trouble indeed! I cannot deny that the EU has done some good in the world and I cannot deny that Britain has benefited from being a member. I just wish that we could pay to have access to the markets, while retaining control over the laws in our lands. I want us to be in Europe, as a partner but not as a vassal. In short, I would like us to stay within the EU but with major reforms. I know that any reforms I suggest will not be read by anyone in power and I know they are probably unrealistic but I thought I would put it out there just to see what people think. I would like to see a NICE’er European Union. The National Institute for Clinical Excellence is a Non Departmental Public Body (NDPB), part of the UK Department of Health but a separate organisation (http://www.nice.org.uk/aboutnice/whoweare/who_we_are.jsp). NICE’s role is to advise the UK health service and social services. It does this by assessing the available evidence for treatments/ therapies/ policies etc and then by producing guidelines outlining the evidence and the suggested best course of action. None of these guidelines are enforced by law, for example, as a doctor you do not have to follow the NICE recommendations but if you ignore them and your patient suffers as a consequence then you are likely to be in big trouble with the General Medical Council. So, here would be my recommendations for EU reform: First, we all pay pretty much the same as we do now for access to the European market. We continue with free movement and we keep the European Council but elect the President. This way all the member states can meet up and decide if they want to share any major policies. We all benefit from free movement and we all benefit from a larger free trade area. Second, we get rid of most of the rest of the EU institutions and replace them with an institute a bit like NICE. The European Institute for Policy Excellence (EIPE) would be (hopefully) quite a small department that looks at the best available evidence and then produces guidance on the policy. A shorter executive summary would hopefully also be available for everyday people to read and understand what the policy is about - just like how patients can read NICE executive summaries to understand their condition better. Then any member state could choose to adopt the policy if their parliaments think it worthwhile. This voluntary opt-in system would mean that states retain control of their laws, would probably adopt the policies voluntarily (eventually) and that the European citizens might actually grow to like the EU laws if they can be shown to be evidence based, in the public’s best interests, in the control of the public and not just a law/red tape imposed from above. The European Union should be a place where our elected officials go to debate and agree policies in the best interests of their electorates. There should therefore be an opt-out of any policy for any member state that does not think it will benefit from a policy. This looser union that I would like to see will probably not happen and I do worry that one day we will wake up in the undemocratic united federal states of Europe but this worry should not force us to make an irrational choice now. We should not be voting to "leave the EU at all costs" but we should be voting for reform and a better more co-operative international community. I would not dare suggest who any of you should vote for but I hope you use your vote for change and reform and not more of the same.  
jacob matthews
over 6 years ago
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5
115

A healthy environment can prevent heart disease

Cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including heart disease and stroke, are the n°1 killer worldwide and in Europe, where they cause the death of over 10 000 people daily, i.e. more than all cancers combined (1).  
escardio.org
almost 5 years ago
Preview
4
121

Google Glass for the first time in Italy in an operating room

Google Glass debuts for the very first time in Italy in an operating room. Thanks to the partnership between Humanitas and Vidiemme/Rokivo, Glass has been us...  
YouTube
about 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1nftkgk?1444774218
4
300

Gin & Tonic Anyone?

It was a Saturday, about tea-time in the quaint village of Athelstaneford, East Lothian. Mrs Alexandria Agutter sat in her cottage, enjoying the delights of the late-summer evening with a glass of gin and tonic. She listlessly sipped from the rather generous pick-me up, no doubt chewing over the happenings of the day. Blast! The taste was much too bitter to her liking. She stood up. And promptly crumpled to the floor in a dizzied heap. It had not been five minutes when a fiery pain gripped her parched throat and in her frenzied turn she watched the bleary room become draped in a gossamery silk. How Dame Agatha would approve. But this is no crime novel, on that fateful day, 24th August 1994, poor Mrs Agutter immortalised herself in the history books of forensic medicine; she was the victim of a revered toxin and a vintage one it was too. She had unwittingly imbibed a G&T laced with a classic poison of antiquity. A clue from the 21st century: do you recall the first Hunger Games film adaption? Those inviting purple-black berries or as Suzanne Collins coined them ‘Nightlock’; a portmanteau of hemlock and Deadly Nightshade. True to the laters’ real life appearance those onscreen fictional fruits played a recurring cameo role. Deadly Nightshade is a perennial shrub of the family Solanaceae and a relative of the humble potato (a member of the Solanus genus). It is a resident of our native woodland and may be found as far afield as Europe, Africa and Western Asia. The 18th century taxonomist, Carl Linnaeus gave the plant an intriguing name in his great Species Plantarum. The genus Atropa is aptly named after one of the three Greek Fates, Atropos. She is portrayed shearing the thread of a mortal’s life so determining the time and manner of its inevitable end. The Italian species name belladona (beautiful woman) refers to the striking mydriatic effect of the plant on the eye. The name pays homage to Pietro Andre Mattioli, a 16th century physician from Sienna, who was allegedly the first to describe the plant’s use among the Venetian glitterati - ladies of fashion favoured the seductive, doe-eyed look. Belladona is poisonous in its entirety. It was from the plant’s roots in 1831, the German apothecary Heinrich F. G. Mein isolated a white, odourless, crystalline powder: it was (surprise, surprise) atropine. Atropine is a chiral molecule. From its natural plant source it exists as a single stereoisomer L-atropine, which also happens to display a chiral potency 50-100 times that of its D-enantiomer. As with many other anaesthetic agents it is administered as a racemic mixture. How strange that atropine now sits among the anaesthetist’s armamentarium, its action as a competitive antimuscarinic to counter vagal stimulation belies its dark history. It was a favourite of Roman housewives seeking retribution against their less than faithful husbands and a staple of the witch’s potion cupboard. Little wonder how belladona became known as the Devil’s plant. Curiouser still it’s also the antidote for other poisons, most notably the organophosphates or nerve gases. On account of its non-selective antagonism, atropine produces a constellation of effects: the inhibition of salivary, lacrimal and sweat glands occurs at low doses; dry mouth and skin are early markers. Pyrexia is a central effect exacerbated by the inability to sweat. Flushing of the face due to skin vessel vasodilatation. Low parasympathetic tone causes a moderate sinus tachycardia. Vision is blurred as the eye becomes dilated, unresponsive to light and accommodation is impaired. Mental disorientation, agitation and ataxia give the impression of drunkedness or a delirium tremens like syndrome. Visual hallucinations, often of butterflies or silk blowing in the wind, are a late feature. It was then that Mr Agutter, seemingly untroubled by the sight of his wife’s problematic situation, proceeded to leave a message with the local practitioner. How fortunate they were to have the vigilant locum check the answering machine and come round to the Agutter’s lodge accompanied by an ambulance crew. The attending paramedic had the presence of mind to pour the remainder of Mrs Agutter’s beverage into a nearby jam jar, while Mr Agutter handed over what he suspected to be the offending ingredient: the bottle of Indian tonic water. As it soon transpired there were seven other casualties in the surrounding countryside of East Lothian – all involving an encounter with tonic water. In fact by some ironic twist of fate, two of the victims were the wife and son of Dr Geoffry Sharwood-Smith, a consultant aneasthetist. Obviously very familiar with the typical toxidrome of anticholinergic agents, he was quick to suspect atropine poisoning. Although for a man of his position with daily access to a sweetshop of drugs, it was not something to draw attention to. Through no small amount of cunning had the poisoner(s) devised the plan. It was elegant; atropine is very bitter. So much so that it can be detected at concentrations of 100 parts per million (0.001%). Those foolish enough to try the berries of belladonna during walks in the woods are often saved by the berry’s sour taste. They are soon spat out. But the quinine in the tonic water was a worthy disguise. The lethal dose for an adult is approximately 90-130mg, however atropine sensitivity is highy variable. In its salt form, atropine sulfate, it is many times more soluble: >100g can be dissolved in 100ml of water. So 1ml may contain roughly tenfold the lethal dose. There ensued a nationwide scare; 50 000 bottles of Safeway branded Indian tonic water were sacrificed. Only six bottles had been contaminated. They had all been purchased, tops unsealed, from the local Safeway in Hunter’s Tryst. Superficially this looked like the handiwork of a psychopath with a certain distaste for the supermarket brand, and amidst the media furore, it did have some verisimilitude: one of the local papers received a letter from 25 year old, Wayne Smith admitting himself as the sole perpetrator. The forensic scientist, Dr Howard Oakley analysed the contents of the bottles. They all contained a non-lethal dose, 11-74mg/litre of atropine except for the Agutter’s, it contained 103mg/litre. The jam jar holding Mrs Agutter’s drink bore even more sinister results, the atropine concentration was 292mg/L. It would appear Mrs Agutter had in some way outstayed her welcome. But she lived. A miscalculation on the part of the person who had added an extra seasoning of atropine to her drink. According to the numbers she would have had to swallow a can’s worth (330ml) to reach the lethal dose. Thankfully she had taken no more than 50mg. The spotlight suddenly fell on Dr Paul Agutter. He was a lecturer of biochemistry at the nearby University of Napier, which housed a research syndicate specialising in toxicology. CCTV footage had revealed his presence at the Safeway in Hunter’s Tryst and there was eye witness evidence of him having placed bottles onto the shelves. Atropine was also detected by the forensic investigators on a cassete case in his car. Within a matter of two weeks he would be arrested for the attempted murder of his wife. Despite the calculated scheme to delay emergency services and to pass the blame onto a non-existent mass poisoner, he had not accomplished the perfect murder. Was there a motive? Allegedly his best laid plans were for the sake of a mistress, a mature student from Napier. He served seven years of a twelve year sentence. Astonishingly, upon his release from Glenochil prison in 2002, he contacted his then former wife proclaiming his innocence and desire to rejoin her in their Scottish home. A proposition she was not very keen on. Dr Agutter was employed by Manchester University as a lecturer of philosophy and medical ethics. He is currently an associate editor of the online journal Theoretical Biology and Medical Modelling. We will never know the true modus operandi as Dr Agutter never confessed to the crime. Perhaps all this story can afford is weak recompense for the brave followers of the Dry January Campaign. Oddly these sort of incidents never appear in their motivational testimonials. Acknowledgements Emsley J. Molecules of Murder. 2008, Cambridge, RSC Publishing, p.46-67. Lee MR. Solanaceae IV: Atropa belladona, deadly nightshade. J R Coll Physicians Edinb. March 2007; 37: 77-84. Illustrator Edward Wong This blog post is a reproduction of an article published in the The Medical Student Newspaper January issue, 2014 http://www.themedicalstudent.co.uk/  
James Wong
over 6 years ago
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3
89

Review of orthopaedic services: Prepared for the Auditor General for Scotland. March 2010

Review of orthopaedic services: Prepared for the Auditor General for Scotland. March 2010. Website http://www.audit-scotland.gov.uk/media/article.php?id=128 "In recent years, the National Health Service (NHS) in Scotland has significantly reduced the length of time people are waiting to receive orthopaedic procedures such as hip replacements and knee operations. Over 95% of patients are now treated within 26 weeks of referral, compared to only 66% in 2003. But there is scope to make savings by working more efficiently. An Audit Scotland report, Review of orthopaedic services, says there is high demand for these services. Orthopaedic care is particularly important for older people, who have the highest rates of fractures and joint replacement."  
Chris Oliver
over 10 years ago
Preview
3
18

IP podcast - Economic Disparity And Childhood Mortality Due To Injury In Europe

Stream IP podcast - Economic Disparity And Childhood Mortality Due To Injury In Europe by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 5 years ago
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2
30

Compare and Contrast Healthcare delivery in France and the UK

This was a 3rd Year presentation I gave after coming back from a 6 month clinical placement in Bordeaux. It aims to summarise the differences in Healthcare between France and England, as well as communicating some personal experiences.  
Charlotte Patterson
over 9 years ago
Emj cardiology 3.1 2015 m newsletter
2
39

Left Ventricular Cardiomyopathy in Mitral Valve Prolapse: Fact or Fiction? - European Medical Journal

The European Medical Journal (EMJ) is an open-access, peer-reviewed medical journal. Founded in 2012 as an imprint of Gorely New Media, the European Medical Journal provides reviews, symposiums and developments from Europe's medical congresses. Each journal is published six weeks after its relevant congress.  
emjreviews.com
almost 5 years ago
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2
21

Valtech Cardio's Cardioband for Minimally Invasive Mitral Valve Annuloplasties Approved in Europe |

Valtech Cardio, a company out of Or Yehuda, Israel, won European CE Mark approval to introduce its Cardioband annuloplasty system. The Cardioband allows fo  
medgadget.com
almost 5 years ago
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2
29

Comparison of hospital variation in acute myocardial infarction care and outcome between Sweden and United Kingdom

Objective To assess the between hospital variation in use of guideline recommended treatments and clinical outcomes for acute myocardial infarction in Sweden and the United Kingdom.  
feeds.bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
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1
26

The Mental Capacity Act (England and Wales)

Came into force in 2007 Applies to everyone over 16 in the UK Provides the legal framework to make decisions for those who lack capacity to do so themselves Protects people who lack capacity Empowers individuals who may have reduced capacity to still make decisions for themselves    
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 6 years ago
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1
35

The Mental Health Act (England and Wales)

This was passed in 1983, and amended in 2007. . It is rather long and detailed. It allows for the compulsory admission of those who are mentally ill.  In practical circumstances, doctors and social workers will try to persuade patients to be admitted voluntarily, but in some circumstances, you may have to ‘section’ them to allow treatment against their will. The most important parts are 2,3,4,5 & 135 and 136.    
almostadoctor.com - free medical student revision notes
over 6 years ago
Preview
1
28

Should doctors prescribe cannabinoids?

The medical use of cannabis was advocated in the United States in the 1970s and 1980s when clinical trials of oral synthetic tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other oral synthetic cannabinoids reported efficacy in controlling nausea in patients with cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy.1 Dronabinol (an oral synthetic THC) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1985 for this indication,1 but it was not widely used because patients were unable to titrate doses or disliked its psychoactive effects.1 It is still available in the US, United Kingdom, and the rest of Europe.  
bmj.com
over 6 years ago
Www.bmj
1
18

Deaths from pancreatic cancer in Europe continue to increase while rates for other cancers fall

Deaths from pancreatic cancer are predicted to increase in men and women while rates for all other cancers, except lung cancer in women, continue to decrease, says an analysis of current trends across European countries published this week.1  
bmj.com
over 6 years ago
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1
15

Source of hepatitis A outbreak in Europe may be frozen berries

The number of cases of hepatitis A in 11 European countries has risen to 1315 since January 2013, show new figures from the European Food Safety Authority.  
bmj.com
over 6 years ago
Preview
1
30

Should doctors prescribe cannabinoids?

The medical use of cannabis was advocated in the United States in the 1970s and 1980s when clinical trials of oral synthetic tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other oral synthetic cannabinoids reported efficacy in controlling nausea in patients with cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy.1 Dronabinol (an oral synthetic THC) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1985 for this indication,1 but it was not widely used because patients were unable to titrate doses or disliked its psychoactive effects.1 It is still available in the US, United Kingdom, and the rest of Europe.  
www.bmj.com
over 6 years ago
Www.bmj
1
22

Should doctors prescribe cannabinoids?

The medical use of cannabis was advocated in the United States in the 1970s and 1980s when clinical trials of oral synthetic tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other oral synthetic cannabinoids reported efficacy in controlling nausea in patients with cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy.1 Dronabinol (an oral synthetic THC) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1985 for this indication,1 but it was not widely used because patients were unable to titrate doses or disliked its psychoactive effects.1 It is still available in the US, United Kingdom, and the rest of Europe.  
bmj.com
over 6 years ago
Preview
1
16

Should doctors prescribe cannabinoids?

The medical use of cannabis was advocated in the United States in the 1970s and 1980s when clinical trials of oral synthetic tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other oral synthetic cannabinoids reported efficacy in controlling nausea in patients with cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy.1 Dronabinol (an oral synthetic THC) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1985 for this indication,1 but it was not widely used because patients were unable to titrate doses or disliked its psychoactive effects.1 It is still available in the US, United Kingdom, and the rest of Europe.  
www.bmj.com
over 6 years ago
Www.bmj
1
19

Should doctors prescribe cannabinoids?

The medical use of cannabis was advocated in the United States in the 1970s and 1980s when clinical trials of oral synthetic tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other oral synthetic cannabinoids reported efficacy in controlling nausea in patients with cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy.1 Dronabinol (an oral synthetic THC) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1985 for this indication,1 but it was not widely used because patients were unable to titrate doses or disliked its psychoactive effects.1 It is still available in the US, United Kingdom, and the rest of Europe.  
bmj.com
over 6 years ago