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In brief

Ireland introduces standardised packaging of cigarettes: Ireland has passed legislation banning all forms of marketing branding (including logos and colours) from cigarette packaging. It is the first country in Europe to introduce standardised packaging and the second in the world. Australia introduced it in 2012.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Static.www.bmj
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Germany, the G7, and global health

Remember global health? It had a fantastic 10 years from 2002-12—the “golden decade” of rising health aid1—but is now slipping down the international agenda. Some development experts argue that other sectors, such as agriculture, should “take centre stage.”2 This is misguided. Health investment is the largest contributor to sustainable development.3 And a retreat from health would threaten the impressive gains of the past decade in reducing infectious disease, maternal, and child mortality.4  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
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Number of people travelling to Switzerland for assisted dying doubles in four years

The number of people travelling to Switzerland to get help to end their life has doubled in four years, with most people travelling from Germany or the United Kingdom, a study has found.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
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Most common cause of death in England and Wales in 2013 was heart disease in men and dementia in women

The leading cause of death among men in England and Wales in 2013 was ischaemic heart disease, accounting for 15.4% of deaths, while among women it was dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, which caused 12.2% of deaths, show the latest statistics.1 Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease overtook heart disease as the leading cause of death among women in 2012.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
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Inspectors to investigate baby’s death in Sicily after neonatal bed could not be found

Concern over the state of Italy’s healthcare system has been raised after the death of a newborn baby who was transported across Sicily in search of an intensive care cot.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
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WHO | United Kingdom is declared free of Ebola virus disease

Statement by WHO Regional Office for Europe: United Kingdom is declared free of Ebola virus disease  
who.int
over 5 years ago
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British Association of Sport Rehabilitators and Trainers (UK and Ireland)

Stream British Association of Sport Rehabilitators and Trainers (UK and Ireland) by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 5 years ago
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Dr Cees-Rein van den Hoogenband on being Chief Medical Officer of the Netherlands' Olympic team

Stream Dr Cees-Rein van den Hoogenband on being Chief Medical Officer of the Netherlands' Olympic team by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 5 years ago
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About Cardiovascular Disease in Europe

The facts and figures.  
escardio.org
over 5 years ago
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MRSA In Practice

Aimed at junior hospital doctors and general practitioners, the In Practice Series has been devised by RSM Press to present cutting-edge and clear-cut opinion leader advice and summary acts related to every day clinical practice.MRSA is an all too familiar acronym in use in most UK hospitals. MRSA was discovered in the 1960s however has not been a public cause for concern until the current pandemic started in the 1990s. It shows no signs of abating and the UK now has about the highest prevalence in Europe. It has captured the attention of the public and politicians but how important is it in clinical practice? How did it evolve, will it go away or get worse - will it really develop into the untreatable superbug? Is it more virulent than Staphylococcus aureus, what are its common clinical presentation and the best treatments? What are the best ways to control it if indeed we should bother? How much does it cost the NHS? Do we have any new strategies up our sleeves? These are just some of the intriguing questions that a distinguished panel of authors from around the world have tried to answer in this monograph.Some of the topics covered include:Historical perspectives - Ian Phillips (London)Immunology and pathogenesis of MRSA - Von Belkum (Rotterdam) Antibiotic resistance in MRSA - Giles Edwards (Glasgow)Evolution of MRSA - Mark Enright (London University)Epidemiology of MRSA - Vuopia-Varkila (Finland) Control of MRSA - Barry Cookson (London) Georgia Duckworth (London) & Hans Kolmos (Denmark) Treatment of MRSA - Ian Gould (Aberdeen)Decolonisation of MRSA patient - A Seaton (Glasgow)Laboratory aspects- developments in detection and AST - Donald Morrison (Glasgow) Alternative treatments - Tom Riley (Perth, Australia)MRSA in the home and on the farm - Vos + Vos (Nijmegen/Rotterdam)Mopping up MRSA - Stephanie Dancer (Glasgow)Guidance to control MRSA from the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh - D Baird (Glasgow)With its easily accessible approach, broken down into easy-to read chapters, the tips and useful advice of this text makes this a key text for all hospital practitioners. MRSA In Practice is a book that no health care professional can afford to be without.  
books.google.co.uk
over 5 years ago
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Peripheral Neuropathy & Neuropathic Pain

Written by one of the world's leading experts — Professor Gérard Said MD FRCP, Dpt de Neurologie, Hôpital de la Salpêtrière, Paris, France Peripheral neuropathy is a common medical condition, the diagnosis of which is often protracted or delayed. It is not always easy to relate a neuropathy to a specific cause. Many people do not receive a full diagnosis, their neuropathy often being described as 'idiopathic' or 'cryptogenic'. It is said that in Europe, one of the most common causes is diabetes mellitus but there are also many other known potential causes. The difficulty of diagnosis, the limited number of treatment options, a perceived lack of knowledge of the subject —except in specialised clinics, the number of which are limited — all add to the difficulties which many neuropathy patients have to face. Another additional problem for many patients is that once having received a full, or even a partial diagnosis, they are then often discharged back to their primary healthcare team who, in many instances, know little about this condition and how it may impact upon their patients' lives. In order to help bridge this gap in medical knowledge and to give healthcare providers a better understanding of this often distressing condition, The Neuropathy Trust has commissioned a new book on this complex topic. Written by one of the world's leading experts on neuropathy, Professor Gérard Said, it is a 'must read' and also a handy reference book for doctors, nurses, physiotherapists, chiropodists/podiatrists and other health professionals.As well as covering the anatomy of the nervous system and the basic pathological processes that may affect the peripheral nerves, the book covers a whole range of neuropathic conditions. These include, for example, Guillain-Barré syndrome, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, vasculitic neuropathies, infectious neuropathies, diabetic and other metabolic neuropathies, hereditary neuropathies and neuropathies in patients with cancer. Given the almost explosive increase in diabetes predicted over the coming years and the high incidence of HIV infections alone, not to mention all the other possible causes of peripheral neuropathy, no self-respecting medical unit should be without a copy of this new book on their shelves. The author, Professor Gérard Said, is based in the Department of Neurology at the prestigious Hôpital de la Salpêtrière in Paris. He has devoted a lifetime to the study of peripheral neuropathy and — alongside other great neurological names — added much to the world's ever-growing store of knowledge on this complex but fascinating condition which affects so many individuals.  
books.google.co.uk
about 5 years ago
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OnMedica - News - Heart specialists call for Europe to ban trans fats in processed food

Move follows US regulator’s recent decision to ban these fats in commercial products  
onmedica.com
about 5 years ago
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Dementia levels 'are stabilising' - BBC News

The number of people with dementia is levelling off in parts of Western Europe - and even falling in the UK - according to a report by University of Cambridge scientists.  
bbc.co.uk
about 5 years ago
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Radiology websites: Conventional radiology

European Society of Radiology is the principal forum for radiology education and practice in Europe. The web portal of ESR/ECR is available at http://www.myesr.org/cms/website.php which has many distinctive sections that cover ‘ESR/ECR News’ and ‘Abstract Submission for the Annual ECR Conference.’ A membership is essential to experience the various academic material on offer. Some of the e-learning tools on offer are eECR (a selection of scientific highlights of ECR), EPOS™ (Electronic Presentation Online System), EDIPS (ECR's Digital Preview System), and EURORAD. EURORAD at http://www.eurorad.org/ is a large peer-reviewed teaching database of medical information, imaging data, and radiological cases. It contains ‘case reports for medical students (simple cases), residents in radiology (everyday cases), and senior radiologists (complex cases).’ EURORAD has been enhanced with new features such as a fast search engine and a multilingual navigation tool that makes it a handy online learning reference in radiology.  
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
about 5 years ago
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New professor discusses health economics and Switzerland

Weaver has a bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Nechâtel, Switzerland, and a master’s in economics from the University of Lausanne, Switzerland.  
breezejmu.org
almost 5 years ago
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Top World Universities | US News Best Global Universities - US News

See the rankings for the best universities in the world at US News. Top university rankings for Asia, Australia, Europe and more.  
usnews.com
almost 5 years ago
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News, info, live news - Radio France Internationale - RFI

Follow any political information, cultural, sporting and live streaming on RFI. The latest information, news and events in France, Europe and around the world.  
english.rfi.fr
almost 5 years ago
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Poverty Dampens Genetic Influence on IQ, in the US - Association for Psychological Science

An analysis of data gathered from 14 independent studies indicates that the influence of genes on intelligence varies according to people’s social class in the US, but not in Western Europe or Australia. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.  
psychologicalscience.org
over 4 years ago
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Discussion: a price for advances in medicine. Phase I clinical trial fail in France

Let me suggest a topic for discussion that might be a bit provocative. It's about the prices that sometimes we have to pay for advances in medicine. Ist phase clinical trial of a new painkiller drug manufactured by Bial (Portugal) failed with one man brain-dead and another five ones in critical state with neurologic symptoms, three of them are suspected to have irreversable changes in their CNS. [Links to news articles below] What is your opinion: who carries responsibility for these cases? Bial, Biotrial clinic that carried out the trial or maybe somone else involved? What kind of responsibility must it be provided the fact people involved in the study are volunteers and must have been consulted about specificity and all the issues that can arise in phase I clinical trials? Could there take place unproperly done preclinical trial? What do you think about it? ||You can follow these links to get more information about the case: http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-35337671 http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/857379  
Alina Ivaniuk
over 4 years ago
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Memories of Robert B. Zajonc - Association for Psychological Science

Robert Zajonc was a consummate scientist, scholar and social science researcher. His was a remarkable life, a life led during a renaissance period of social psychology and he had much to do with its development and flourishing over the latter half of the 20th century. Exposed to all forms of personal suffering during his youth and young adulthood, Bob found his way to America and Ann Arbor after spending much of his formative period in his beloved Poland and France during WWII. These experiences would form the crucible for his professional and personal experiences for the remainder of his life. The facts of his scientific and professional contribution are easily documented — seven distinct scientific lines of inquiry; hundreds of scientific papers, each a seminal contribution; dozens of doctoral students, honorary degrees, scientific awards and medals — the list endless and richly deserved. Robert was also a builder. He served as head of the newly developed social psychology program in psychology at Michigan in the 1970s, Director of the Research Center for Group Dynamics in the 1980s, and Director of the Institute for Social Research in the 1990s. All received Robert’s unique imprint for rigor, quality, and innovation. Bob also played a seminal role in the development of social psychology in Europe, leading to the establishment of the Institute for Social Science Research in Warsaw. Bob was also a father, husband, friend, colleague, and mentor. As chronicled in these remembrances from his first doctoral student, Eugene Burnstein, to Piotr Winkielman, his last student at the University of Michigan, Bob passed along his remarkable scientific judgment and insights that will stand the test of history. But there are others in this list between these two bookend students, distinguished scientists all, Richard Nisbett, Susan Fiske, Mahzarin Banaji, Paula Niedenthal, John Bargh and Richard Moreland who were graduate students, colleagues, co-authors, and deep and abiding friends over the decades.  
psychologicalscience.org
over 4 years ago