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2
32

Running through an IV line in 5 min

The basics of running through an IV line  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
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2
21

Pediatric Cardiology-Exercise and Congenital Heart Disease

This Pediatric Cardiology Teaching,lecture conducted by Dr Sangeetha Vishwanath. The topic is - Sports and CHD.  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
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1
30

Copy of THE LIPITOR LAB EXERCISE by Professor Fink

Check-out professor fink's web-site or additional resources in Biology, Anatomy, Physiology & Pharmacology: www.professorfink.com Lecture Outlines by Profess...  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
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1
10

Benefits of Exercise for your Health

This is the best online medical lectures site, providing high quality medical and nursing lectures for students across the globe. Our lectures are oversimpli...  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
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1
25

Fungal Infections – Virtual Grand Rounds | Case Studies

The case studies below begin with symptoms that brought a patient to medical attention. To work through the cases, select an answer to the question asked in bold type. This will lead you through exercises. Buttons to the left of the text will introduce such information as x-rays, slides and CT scans.  
figrandrounds.org
almost 5 years ago
Bryce 300x204
1
37

Running, Rhabdomyolosis, and Renal Failure – Who’s at Risk | Ultrarunning Magazine

if (!window.AdButler){(function(){var s = document.createElement("script"); s.async = true; s.type = "text/javascript";s.src = 'http://servedbyadbutler.com/app.js';var n = document.getElementsByTagName("script")[0]; n.parentNode.insertBefore(s, n);}());} var AdButler = AdButler || {}; AdButler.ads = AdButler.ads || []; var abkw = window.abkw || ''; var plc187921 = window.plc187921 || 0; document.write('<'+'div id="placement_187921_'+plc187921+'"></'+'div>'); AdButler.ads.push({handler: function(opt){ AdButler.register(166749, 187921, [728,90], 'placement_187921_'+opt.place, opt); }, opt: { place: plc187921++, keywords: abkw, domain: 'servedbyadbutler.com' }});  
ultrarunning.com
almost 5 years ago
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1
15

Exercise advice unrealistic, say experts - BBC News

Researchers say current exercise guidelines are unrealistic and argue doctors should promote small increases in activity instead.  
BBC News
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
10

Recommendations for physical activity in older adults

Older adults find it difficult to meet moderate and vigorous exercise targets. Given that a dose-response exists for physical activity and health benefits, Phillip B Sparling and colleagues argue that a change in message to reduce sedentary time and increase light activities may prove more realistic and pave the way to more intense exercise  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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1
32

Running through an IV line in 5 min

The basics of running through an IV line  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
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1
19

STI podcast: Running a prison sexual health service in the UK

Stream STI podcast: Running a prison sexual health service in the UK by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 4 years ago
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1
3

Doctors are urged to encourage patients to be more active to reduce chronic ill health

Doctors in the United Kingdom have been urged to encourage patients to take small amounts of regular exercise and told that they have a leading role to play in reversing the growing contribution of sedentary lifestyles to chronic ill health.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Www.bmj
1
27

Brain training, exercise, and healthy eating slow cognitive decline in elderly people at risk, study finds

A comprehensive programme incorporating individual support for healthy eating, regular exercise, and brain training in addition to managing metabolic and vascular risk factors reduced cognitive decline in older people at risk for dementia, results reported in the Lancet have shown.1  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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1
6

Doctors are urged to encourage patients to be more active to reduce chronic ill health

Doctors in the United Kingdom have been urged to encourage patients to take small amounts of regular exercise and told that they have a leading role to play in reversing the growing contribution of sedentary lifestyles to chronic ill health.  
bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
1
22

Exercise interventions to prevent sports injuries – what you need to know

Stream Exercise interventions to prevent sports injuries – what you need to know by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 4 years ago
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1
15

Training tomorrow’s doctors, in exercise medicine, for tomorrow’s patients

Stream Training tomorrow’s doctors, in exercise medicine, for tomorrow’s patients by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 4 years ago
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1
24

Eccentric hamstring exercises – they work in practice but not in theory?

Stream Eccentric hamstring exercises – they work in practice but not in theory? by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 4 years ago
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1
36

Bob Sallis on exercise as medicine

Stream Bob Sallis on exercise as medicine by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 4 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1ilnrlb?1444774017
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176

Itraconazole Toxicity and Cardiac Health Problems

Itraconazole is an antifungal drug used widely to treat fungal infections and is active against Aspergillus, Candida and Cryptococcus. It is effective and now much cheaper as it has passed out of the period of time granted to its inventor to exclusively sell it - there are now several competing manufacturers. It seems to be an increasingly useful and used drug now it has become more accessible which is a good thing in the main but this makes it increasingly important that this drug is properly understood and its very severe potential side effects appreciated and guarded against. These are the warnings published by the World Health Organisation Risk of congestive heart failure The agency says that while the available evidence suggests that the risk of heart failure with short courses of itraconazole is low in healthy, young patients, prescribers should exercise caution when prescribing the drug to at-risk patients. Amendments to the product information of all itraconazole formulations have been made to reflect this information. Risk to pregnant women By April 2000 the UMC had received 43 case reports from 5 countries regarding the use of itraconazole by pregnant women. 25 of these pregnancies ended in embryonic or foetal death. The remaining 19 reports described a variety of congenital malformation or neonatal disorders. In the 38 reports in which the route of administration was specified the drug was taken orally. The data suggested that: inspite of the approved recommendations and warnings itraconazole is being taken by pregnant women for minor indications, reported human experience seems to lend support to the experimental evidence that itraconazole is teratogenic, there is a predominance of abortion, and more firm warnings may be needed in the product information.Although not apparent from the UMC reports, a further question of interest was if itraconazole might decrease the reliability of oral contraceptives and so lead to unintended exposure in pregnancy. Care thus needs to be taken about which patients are prescribed itraconazole, adequate monitoring needs to be put in place if needed and sufficient advice given with the drug to ensure the patient is aware of the risks involved and the signs & symptoms to look out for.  
Graham Atherton
over 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1fflsju?1444774064
4
2737

My Grandfather's Complimentary Medicine - The secret to a healthy old age?

Complimentary medicine (CAM) is controversial, especially when it is offered by the NHS! You only have to read the recent health section of the Telegraph to see Max Pemberton and James LeFanu exchanging strong opinions. Most of the ‘therapies’ available on the market have little to no evidence base to support their use and yet, I believe that it has an important role to play in modern medicine. I believe that CAM is useful not because of any voodoo magic water or because the soul of a tiger lives on in the dust of one of its claws but because modern medicine hasn’t tested EVERYTHING yet and because EVERY DOCTOR should be allowed to use a sugar pill or magic water to ease the anguish of the worried well every now and again. The placebo effect is powerful and could be used to help a lot of patients as well as save the NHS a lot of money. I visited my grandfather for a cup of coffee today. As old people tend to do we discussed his life, his life lessons and his health . My grandfather is 80-something years old and worked as a collier underground for about 25 years before rising up through the ranks of management. In his entire life he has been to hospital twice: Once to have his tonsils removed and once to have a TKR – total knee replacement. My granddad maintains that the secret of his good health is good food, plenty of exercise, keeping his mind active and 1 dried Ivy berry every month! He takes the dried ivy berries because a gypsie once told his father that doing so would prevent infection of open wounds; common injuries in those working under ground. It is my granddad’s firm belief that the ivy berries have kept him healthy over the past 60 years, despite significant drinking and a 40 year pack history! My grandfather is the only person I know who takes this quite bizarre and potentially dangerous CAM, but he has done so for over half a century now and has suffered no adverse effects (that we can tell anyway)! This has led me to think about the origin of medicine and the evolution of modern medicine from ancient treatments: Long ago medicine meant ‘take this berry and see what happens’. Today, medicine means ‘take this drug (or several drugs) and see what happens, except we’ll write it down if it all goes wrong’. Just as evidence for modern therapies have been established, is there any known evidence for the ivy berry and what else is it used for? My grandfather gave me a second piece of practical advice this afternoon, in relation to the treatment of open wounds: To stop bleeding cover the wound in a bundle of spiders web. You can collect webs by wrapping them up with a stick, then slide the bundle of webs off the stick onto the wound and hold it in place. If the wound is quite deep then cover the wound in ground white pepper. I have no idea whether these two tips actually work but they reminded me of ‘QuickClot’ (http://www.z-medica.com/healthcare/About-Us/QuikClot-Product-History.aspx) a powder that the British Army currently issues to all its frontline troops for the treatment of wounds. The powder is poured into the wound and it forms a synthetic clot reducing blood loss. This technology has been a life-saver in Afghanistan but is relatively expensive. Supposing that crushed white pepper has similar properties, wouldn’t that be cheaper? While I appreciate that the two are unlikely to have the same level of efficacy, I am merely suggesting that we do not necessarily dismiss old layman’s practices without a little investigation. I intend to go and do a few searches on pubmed and google but just thought I’d put this in the public domain and see if anyone has any corroborating stories. If your grandparents have any rather strange but potentially useful health tips I’d be interested in hearing them. You never know they may just be the treatments of the future!  
jacob matthews
over 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 y4lule?1444774066
1
2587

Staying Active with Diabetes

Many know that engaging in regular physical activity and exercise will tremendously improve one’s health and overall well-being. This goes the same, if not tenfold, for individuals suffering with diabetes. However, before rushing in a high intensity or physically straining physical régime, consult with your diabetes care provider. Make sure to discuss your plans take note of any precautions that may be needed to be made prior or during these activities. It will be interesting to know that individuals with type 2 diabetes who do participate in some exercise (even at work) reduce their risk for heart disease. Remember that a physical examination that focuses on the signs and symptoms of diseases affecting the heart and blood vessels, eyes, feet, nervous system, and kidneys must be made in advance before any extensive work out plan takes into action. Any strenuous strength training or high-impact exercise is generally not recommended for people with uncontrolled diabetes. Such strain caused by these exercises can weaken blood vessels in the eyes of patients who suffer from the common diabetic complication known as retinopathy. High-impact exercise can also injure blood vessels in the feet. In fact, diabetes can contribute to foot problems in several ways: diabetic neuropathy; which is a nerve disorder that causes numbing and pain in the hands, legs and feet as well as damage to internal organs; also poor circulation to the feet is another problem that can be associated due to diabetes. Keeping this in mind it is imperative to keeping your feet healthy, investing in some great therapeutic footwear like these can be a great step in moving toward healthy feet! One thing is for sure, physical activity can increase the health in anyone’s life. Always make sure to take care of your body and take the extra precautions needed in order to maintain proper health.  
Camille Mitchell
over 6 years ago