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GeneralPractitioners

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RCGP launches first-ever recruitment video to attract more GPs into frontline patient care

The first-ever national recruitment video to encourage medical students to choose general practice as a career has been launched by the Royal College of General Practitioners.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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GPs need support to lift their obesity game

General practitioners are not routinely documenting obesity indicators such as Body Mass Index and Waist Circumference, lessening the potential positive effect they could have on healthy...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
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It will take up to 31 years to deliver number of GPs promised by political parties, says RCGP

It will take between 20 and 31 years to achieve the number of extra GPs pledged by three political parties in the run up to the general election, the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) has said.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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Stop the damaging drive towards a health market, former college president demands

The former chair of the Royal College of General Practitioners has issued an impassioned plea to UK politicians to “stop the relentless and damaging drive towards a health market.”  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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Put more paediatric knowledge into primary care to tackle UK’s poor child health outcomes, says report

General practitioners assessing or treating children with unscheduled care should have access to immediate telephone advice from a consultant paediatrician, new standards have said.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
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28

MRSA In Practice

Aimed at junior hospital doctors and general practitioners, the In Practice Series has been devised by RSM Press to present cutting-edge and clear-cut opinion leader advice and summary acts related to every day clinical practice.MRSA is an all too familiar acronym in use in most UK hospitals. MRSA was discovered in the 1960s however has not been a public cause for concern until the current pandemic started in the 1990s. It shows no signs of abating and the UK now has about the highest prevalence in Europe. It has captured the attention of the public and politicians but how important is it in clinical practice? How did it evolve, will it go away or get worse - will it really develop into the untreatable superbug? Is it more virulent than Staphylococcus aureus, what are its common clinical presentation and the best treatments? What are the best ways to control it if indeed we should bother? How much does it cost the NHS? Do we have any new strategies up our sleeves? These are just some of the intriguing questions that a distinguished panel of authors from around the world have tried to answer in this monograph.Some of the topics covered include:Historical perspectives - Ian Phillips (London)Immunology and pathogenesis of MRSA - Von Belkum (Rotterdam) Antibiotic resistance in MRSA - Giles Edwards (Glasgow)Evolution of MRSA - Mark Enright (London University)Epidemiology of MRSA - Vuopia-Varkila (Finland) Control of MRSA - Barry Cookson (London) Georgia Duckworth (London) & Hans Kolmos (Denmark) Treatment of MRSA - Ian Gould (Aberdeen)Decolonisation of MRSA patient - A Seaton (Glasgow)Laboratory aspects- developments in detection and AST - Donald Morrison (Glasgow) Alternative treatments - Tom Riley (Perth, Australia)MRSA in the home and on the farm - Vos + Vos (Nijmegen/Rotterdam)Mopping up MRSA - Stephanie Dancer (Glasgow)Guidance to control MRSA from the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh - D Baird (Glasgow)With its easily accessible approach, broken down into easy-to read chapters, the tips and useful advice of this text makes this a key text for all hospital practitioners. MRSA In Practice is a book that no health care professional can afford to be without.  
books.google.co.uk
about 4 years ago
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Informed consent? How do primary care professionals prepare women for cervical smears: A qualitative study

Cervical screening is a procedure that is mainly carried out in primary care, predominantly by general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses (PNs). Much has been published about the effects on women of receiving an abnormal smear result but little has been done to investigate the preparation of women by primary care professionals for this.  
sciencedirect.com
about 4 years ago
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24

Textbook of Post-ICU Medicine

Surviving critical illness is not always the happy ending that we imagine for patients. Intensive care unit (ICU) teams have traditionally focused on short term goals such as stabilizing or reversing organ system dysfunction, with little understanding of what became of patients once they left the ICU. However, research conducted in recent years has demonstrated that many ICU survivors can suffer from ill health and mental health issues for months or years to follow. The Textbook of Post-ICU Medicine: The Legacy of Critical Care identifies the long term outcomes of ICU and the steps that can be taken to improve patients' health and wellbeing. Describing the major clinical syndromes affecting ICU survivors, the book delineates established or postulated biological mechanisms of the post-acute recovery process, and discusses strategies for treatment and rehabilitation to promote recovery in the ICU and in the long term. Many ICU survivors suffer from a range of long-lasting physical and psychological issues such as end stage renal disease, congestive heart failure, cognitive impairment, neuromuscular weakness, and depression or anxiety, which affect their overall quality of life and ability to lead productive lives. This book discusses the science of the recovery process and the innovative treatment regimens which are helping ICU survivors regain function as they heal following trauma or disease. This lingering burden or 'legacy' of critical illness is now recognized as a major public health issue, with major efforts underway to understand how it can be prevented, mitigated, or treated. The chapters are written by an interdisciplinary panel of leading clinicians and researchers working in the field. The book serves as a unique reference for general practitioners, internists and nurses caring for long term ICU survivors as well as specialists in intensive care medicine, neurology, psychiatry, and rehabilitation medicine.  
books.google.co.uk
about 4 years ago
Www.bmj
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Many UK patients with gonorrhoea are given outdated antibiotics

General practitioners in England are managing chlamydia with the appropriate antibiotics but are not following recommendations for treating gonorrhoea, a study published in the online journal BMJ Open has found.1 This practice could add to the problem of antibiotic resistance, the researchers warn.  
feeds.bmj.com
about 4 years ago
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GP leaders unite in calling for inspections of surgeries to be suspended

The BMA and the Royal College of General Practitioners have both called for the current inspection regime of general practices to be suspended.  
feeds.bmj.com
about 4 years ago
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Normal lower limb variants in children

Musculoskeletal symptoms are one of the leading reasons for visits to general practitioners, with over 10% of children presenting for medical attention each year  
feeds.bmj.com
about 4 years ago
Www.bmj
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GP shortage could mean “untrained” doctors being employed, doctors’ leaders fear

A plan to use government money intended to expand access to primary care to employ doctors who aren’t trained as GPs to provide primary care medical services has been criticised by the BMA and the Royal College of General Practitioners.  
feeds.bmj.com
about 4 years ago
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A case of breathlessness

A 62 year old woman was referred to hospital by her general practitioner because of a few days history of progressive shortness of breath. She had associated fever but no cough or sputum production. Her medical history included rheumatoid arthritis, for which she had been taking methotrexate for the past 12 years.  
feeds.bmj.com
about 4 years ago
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A case of breathlessness

A 62 year old woman was referred to hospital by her general practitioner because of a few days history of progressive shortness of breath. She had associated fever but no cough or sputum production. Her medical history included rheumatoid arthritis, for which she had been taking methotrexate for the past 12 years.  
feeds.bmj.com
about 4 years ago
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A case of breathlessness

A 62 year old woman was referred to hospital by her general practitioner because of a few days history of progressive shortness of breath. She had associated fever but no cough or sputum production. Her medical history included rheumatoid arthritis, for which she had been taking methotrexate for the past 12 years.  
feeds.bmj.com
about 4 years ago
Www.bmj
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Asymmetric hearing loss and tinnitus

A 56 year old man was referred by his general practitioner with a 10 year history of progressive hearing loss and tinnitus, mainly in his right ear. He did not describe otalgia or dizziness. After thinking about it more carefully, however, he admitted that he occasionally felt slightly unsteady but had attributed this to tiredness. His medical history was otherwise unremarkable, and there was no family history of deafness.  
feeds.bmj.com
about 4 years ago
Www.bmj
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18

A man with a mass in the thigh

A 54 year old man presented to his general practitioner because of a fullness in his left lateral thigh that he first noticed while playing golf, although it was not related to an identifiable injury. He had a history of hypertension and fibromyalgia and was taking atenolol, ramipril, pregabalin, and tramadol but was otherwise well. The GP thought that the swelling was caused by a muscular injury, but the patient re-presented four months later because the mass had grown from a small bump to a swelling of 8 cm in diameter. It was also beginning to cause some knee stiffness but no pain. On examination he had a large firm swelling in his lateral thigh. On this occasion his GP referred him on a two week wait to the regional plastic surgery department. An ultrasound scan showed a 6 × 8 cm intramuscular mass with cystic changes and patchy neovascularity, but no inguinal or pelvic lymphadenopathy. Ultrasonography was followed by magnetic resonance imaging, with and without gadolinium contrast (fig 1⇓).  
feeds.bmj.com
about 4 years ago
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31

Drug treatment of adults with nausea and vomiting in primary care

A usually healthy 25 year old man presents to you as his general practitioner at 9 am. He has had fluctuating nausea with four vomits and one loose stool overnight, associated with colicky central abdominal pain. No blood was present in the vomit or stool, and he reports that his girlfriend was recently diagnosed as having “viral gastro.” He is afebrile, intermittently uncomfortable, but otherwise well, with mild epigastric tenderness but no guarding or rebound. Clinically, you believe viral gastroenteritis is the most likely cause of his symptoms, and you consider his request for treatment that will help to stop his vomiting so that he can get to his evening shift at a factory.  
feeds.bmj.com
about 4 years ago
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A patient request for some “deprescribing”

A 52 year old man with a history of type 2 diabetes for 14 years and hypertension for nine years presented to his general practitioner. He was a non-smoker with an alcohol intake of eight units a week. He had been experiencing bloating, abdominal pains, and erratic motions for more than a year. Because he drove about 12 000 miles a year for his job he found the loose motions “a real worry.” He wondered whether any of his problems might be caused by his drugs and asked if he could cut down on any if they weren’t all needed. He admitted to being afraid that his diabetic control might deteriorate and that he might need insulin, like some of his relatives who also had diabetes.  
feeds.bmj.com
about 4 years ago
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Rash on the arms and legs

An 11 year old girl presented to her general practitioner with painful skin lesions on her arms (fig A⇓) and legs (fig B). She had a three week history of an upper respiratory illness and had been started on amoxicillin for presumed lower respiratory tract infection. Three days after starting treatment, she re-attended with a rash on her arms and legs; her parents were worried that it was caused by a drug allergy. Apart …  
feeds.bmj.com
about 4 years ago