New to Meducation?
Sign up
Already signed up? Log In

Category

Preview
1
22

Uterus

Uterus by Dr. Fabian  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
Preview
2
31

Ob/Gyn - Ca Endometrium

The online lecture series for medical students. On demand streaming video lectures. www.mdcrack.tv Owner: MD CRACK  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
Preview
1
4

Ovarian Cancer Screening Tools [UndergroundMed]

For more videos, check out our website at: http://videos.undergroundmed.net  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
Preview
1
20

Spotting the Sick Child

This is a new interactive tool commissioned by the Department of Health to support health professionals in the assessment of the acutely sick child.  
spottingthesickchild.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
0
15

Dilated vein

UpToDate, electronic clinical resource tool for physicians and patients that provides information on Adult Primary Care and Internal Medicine, Allergy and Immunology, Cardiovascular Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Endocrinology and Diabetes, Family Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Hematology, Infectious Diseases, Nephrology and Hypertension, Neurology, Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Women's Health, Oncology, Pediatrics, Pulmonary, Critical Care, Sleep Medicine, Rheumatology, Surgery, and more.  
uptodate.com
almost 5 years ago
Preview
9
478

Preparation for Obstetrics and Gynecology Rotation: Anatomy Review

A description of relevant anatomy for medical, PA and NP students. Efficient preparation for your Obstetrics and Gynecology rotation procedures.  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
Preview
1
13

The disruptive influence of syphilis cures within specialist venereal systems

Stream The disruptive influence of syphilis cures within specialist venereal systems by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 4 years ago
Preview
1
17

STI podcast: Treating and testing for gonorrhoea

Stream STI podcast: Treating and testing for gonorrhoea by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 4 years ago
Preview
1
14

STI podcast: Syphilis in HIV

Stream STI podcast: Syphilis in HIV by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
SoundCloud
over 4 years ago
Preview
9
326

Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) - MADE EASY

What is Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) - MADE EASY This video tutorial is brought to you by: Ali Feili M.D. More on Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS): h...  
YouTube
over 4 years ago
3
0
14

In the case of severe postpartum haemorrhage, is it always necessary to give packed red cells?

In the case of severe postpartum haemorrhage, is it always necessary to give packed red cells?  
fathima mohideen
over 7 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 dgwiwd?1444773986
3
149

My first (and second) week of Obstetrics & Gynaecology

Looking back on this past fortnight, I feel my tutor has been determined to engage me in absolutely everything, and I think it's worked. Whilst not a full blown ob/gyn enthusiast, I have to say I was surprised to admit today that I am enjoying myself. This leads me on to what this reflection is actually on. The preconceptions we hold about what we do, the people we see and the impact it has on us. What I will write about, I am writing about partly because I have had instances where this has happened recently and I have felt fairly guilty, and partly because I want to know if this happens to everyone else (or if I'm just one insensitive individual!!) Now this isn't going to be a very long draft of wisdom that will be quoted by people when I'm long gone, mainly because the phrase 'never judge a book by it's cover,' has been around for god knows how long, but I do feel it's surprising the extent to which I had dismissed that saying, which I had only just realised today. I am fairly certain, that whilst it's not talked about much, most people decide how they're going to speak to other people (keep in mind this is mostly going to be a subconscious process) and act around them when they see them and interact. I am also fairly certain that doctors do this with patients and that this isn't probably innocent and maybe it does impact on the delivery of care. You see a person with bedraggled hair, poor dental hygiene, clothes that look like they haven't been washed, for example, and all the associations that come with that flood into your brain, whether they are false or accurate. Or an individual with an Omega watch, designer clothing with everything in pristine condition. I am willing to bet those two descriptions conjured completely different images of person in your head. More than just the physical image though, there were different lifestyles and choices in life. And would they get different approaches? Maybe. I'm not sure if we are able to switch off the instant preconceptions, but we have to hide them as whilst they may be accurate, there's an equal chance they may be inaccurate! I can tell it's certainly difficult sometimes, yet people manage in the name of professionalism. I think I'm rambling, so I'll end this piece with this: I just wonder if people can tell what you think about them. In an environment where you have to treat everyone equally and preconceptions must be overcome, can the patients see some reaction in the faces of staff that translates for a split second everything that pops into the mind? There may well be a social study on it somewhere, I may look if I get time and if I find one I shall post it. I'd be interested to hear others experiences or thoughts on this topic too!  
Conrad Hayes
over 6 years ago
%3fr=0
27
1008

Confidence Building During Medical Training

My fellow medical students, interns, residents and attendings: I am not a medical student but an emeritus professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, and also a voluntary faculty member at the Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine. I have a great deal of contact with medical students and residents. During training (as student or resident), gaining confidence in one's own abilities is a very important part of becoming a practitioner. This aspect of training does not always receive the necessary attention and emphasis. Below I describe one of the events of confidence building that has had an important and lasting influence on my career as an academic physician. I graduated from medical school in Belgium many years ago. I came to the US to do my internship in a small hospital in up state NY. I was as green as any intern could be, as medical school in Belgium at that time had very little hands on practice, as opposed to the US medical graduates. I had a lot of "book knowledge" but very little practical confidence in myself. The US graduates were way ahead of me. My fellow interns, residents and attendings were really understanding and did their best to build my confidence and never made me feel inferior. One such confidence-building episodes I remember vividly. Sometime in the middle part of the one-year internship, I was on call in the emergency room and was called to see a woman who was obviously in active labor. She was in her thirties and had already delivered several babies before. The problem was that she had had no prenatal care at all and there was no record of her in the hospital. I began by asking her some standard questions, like when her last menstrual period had been and when she thought her due date was. I did not get far with my questioning as she had one contraction after another and she was not interested in answering. Soon the bag of waters broke and she said that she had to push. The only obvious action for me at that point was to get ready for a delivery in the emergency room. There was no time to transport the woman to the labor and delivery room. There was an emergency delivery “pack” in the ER, which the nurses opened for me while I quickly washed my hands and put on gloves. Soon after, a healthy, screaming, but rather small baby was delivered and handed to the pediatric resident who had been called. At that point it became obvious that there was one more baby inside the uterus. Realizing that I was dealing with a twin pregnancy, I panicked, as in my limited experience during my obstetrical rotation some months earlier I had never performed or even seen a twin delivery. I asked the nurses to summon the chief resident, who promptly arrived to my great relief. I immediately started peeling off my gloves to make room for the resident to take my place and deliver this twin baby. However, after verifying that this baby was also a "vertex" without any obvious problem, he calmly stood by, and over my objections, bluntly told me “you can do it”, even though I kept telling him that this was a first for me. I delivered this healthy, screaming twin baby in front of a large number of nurses and doctors crowding the room, only to realize that this was not the end of it and that indeed there was a third baby. Now I was really ready to step aside and let the chief resident take over. However he remained calm and again, stood by and assured me that I could handle this situation. I am not even sure how many triplets he had delivered himself as they are not too common. Baby number three appeared quickly and also was healthy and vigorous. What a boost to my self-confidence that was! I only delivered one other set of triplets later in my career and that was by C-Section. All three babies came head first. If one of them had been a breech the situation might have been quite different. What I will never forget is the implied lesson in confidence building the chief resident gave me. I have always remembered that. In fact I have put this approach in practice numerous times when the roles were reversed later in my career as teacher. Often in a somewhat difficult situation at the bedside or in the operating room, a student or more junior doctor would refer to me to take over and finish a procedure he or she did not feel qualified to do. Many times I would reassure and encourage that person to continue while I talked him or her through it. Many of these junior doctors have told me afterwards how they appreciated this confidence building. Of course one has to be careful to balance this approach with patient safety and I have never delegated responsibility in critical situations and have often taken over when a junior doctor was having trouble. Those interested, can read more about my experiences in the US and a number of other countries, in a free e book, entitled "Crosscultural Doctoring. On and Off the Beaten Path" can be downloaded at this link. Enjoy!  
DR William LeMaire
over 5 years ago
Preview
0
10

Gynecologists: Why See A Gynecologist?

Find out about the medical specialty of gynecology, and what gynecologists do - including information about their qualifications and the medical conditions they typically manage.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
15

Novel cancer vaccine holds promise against ovarian cancer, mesothelioma

A novel approach to cancer immunotherapy - strategies designed to induce the immune system to attack cancer cells - may provide a new and cost-effective weapon against some of the most deadly...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
3

Female IBD patients: Stay up-to-date on your cervical cancer screening

Women with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may be at increased risk of cervical dysplasia and cancer, according to a new study1 published in Clinical Gastroenterology and...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
2

New HPV vaccine offers greater protection against cervical cancer than current vaccine

Scientists have developed a new HPV (human papilloma virus) vaccine which protects against nine types of the virus - seven of which cause most cases of cervical cancer.  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

Twelve-year study suggests procedures to prevent cervical cancer do not affect fertility

Common surgical procedures used to diagnose and treat precancerous cervical lesions do not decrease women's chances of becoming pregnant, according to a study that followed nearly 100,000...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
3

Trust in cervical cancer screening is strong - extending time between tests triggers concern

A newly released survey, Cervical Cancer Today: A National Survey of Attitudes and Behaviors, paints a picture of women and their healthcare providers as resistant to changes in one of the...  
medicalnewstoday.com
over 4 years ago