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medicalwatson-medicineisnotmerchandise

medicalwatson: “medicineisnotmerchandise: “ mynotes4usmle: “ HAND OF BENEDICTION (POPE’S BLESSING): WHICH NERVE IS IT DAMAGED? First of all, let me start by saying that I’ve spent many hours in this...  
beegoestomedicalschool.tumblr.com
over 5 years ago
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181

A Guide to Preeclampsia: Hand-drawn Tutorial

All credit for this video goes to professor May. If there is anything on it that sounds inspirational, it most likely came from her.  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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Double throw hand tie filmed through GoogleGlass

More trials using #throughglass  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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Simple surgical hand tie filmed through GoogleGlass

Just an experiment to see what can be done with Google Glass for medical education but we thought we would share it. Feedback on the concept and other ideas ...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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How to tie a tie: Half Windsor

How to tie a Half Windsor knot. Be sure to check out my other videos: Four in hand knot: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hf90eRPhdjs Double Windsor: http://ww...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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How to tie a tie: Four in Hand knot

How to tie a Four in Hand Knot. Be sure to check out my other videos to learn different knots! Double Windsor: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lNqh_U8hJHc Hal...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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How to tie a tie: Double Windsor Knot

How to tie a double windsor knot. Be sure to check out my other videos for different knots! Four in hand knot: http://youtu.be/hf90eRPhdjs Half Windsor: http...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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1
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Hook of Hamate Fracture - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim

Educational video describing fracture of the Hook of Hamate bone in the hand. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on tw...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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262

BBC Dissected The Incredible Human Hand

Dissecting a real hand, taking it apart layer by layer to reveal what makes it unique in the animal kingdom. We discover what gives our hands an unrivalled c...  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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Wrist Fractures

 
almostadoctor - free medical student revision notes
over 5 years ago
Www.bmj
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A sinister cause of shoulder pain, with numbness and weakness in the ipsilateral hand

A 41 year old patient with insulin dependent diabetes presented with a one month history of progressively worsening pain, numbness, and weakness of his right shoulder and arm. His history included peripheral vascular disease, chronic renal failure, and chronic pancreatitis. He was also a smoker with a 60 pack year history.  
bmj.com
over 5 years ago
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7
141

Male Catheterisation OSCE Guide

There are generally two approaches to catheterisation, the two gloved technique and the clean hand / dirty hand technique. Please use the method taught at your medical school, this guide demonstrates the clean hand / dirty hand method.  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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Hands On | Arthritis Research UK

Read previous editions of Hands On, our publication for GPs.  
arthritisresearchuk.org
over 5 years ago
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Voluntary vs Automatic responses in the Somatic Nervous System.

This question is about the somatic nervous system (SNS). I read that this the SNS part of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and that it controls skeletal muscle. It is therefore thought to be voluntary. In contrast, the autonomic nervous system controls smooth muscle, under involuntary control. What I'm wondering is if reflex arcs (or reflexes) are controlled by the autonomic nervous system, why is it making use of skeletal muscle? Take the example of the reaction of moving your hand away when it is placed on something hot. These motor commands come from the autonomic nervous system but control the arm muscles that are normally controlled consciously. In other words things normally controlled voluntarily. The response was activated by the ANS, and was therefore automatic, but the muscles supplied by these motor commands were skeletal muscles? Can someone explain this (contradition) or perhaps correct my wrong thinking?  
Alex Catley
almost 8 years ago
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How do we explain a patient having a normal finger to nose test but also having dysdiadochokinesia and romberg positive?

How do we explain a patient having a normal finger to nose test but also having dysdiadochokinesia and romberg' positive?  
malek ahmad
over 7 years ago
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Which exact parts of the hand are affected in carpal tunnel syndrome?

I'm asking only about sensitivity. Most pictures of carpal tunnel syndrome show that the thumb, index, middle and the adjacent half of the ring AND the related part of the hand are affected. But this image from fpnotebook.com clearly shows and says that the palm sensitivity is mediated by the branch of the median nerve that does not go through the carpal tunnel. So, I made a new image of carpal tunnel syndrome with only fingers colored. Can anyone who is certain of this say did I make it correct or not?  
Jan Modric
almost 7 years ago
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Guyon's canal syndrome - tingling in hand?

The same question as with carpal tunnel syndrome. Are only the fingers (the pinky and adjacent half of the ring finger) affected or also the related part of the hand? Acoording to my research until now, there can be paresthesia in the pinky side of the hand but only about halfway toward the wrist. Most other pictures show altered sensitivity beyond the wrist.  
Jan Modric
almost 7 years ago
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ulnar nerve injury- finger extension

I understand that one would lose motor function of the hypothenar muscles and lumbricals III and IV. Therefore when asking the patient to straighten their fingers their would be the characteristic ulnar claw. However, i'm having difficulty understanding why this would be the case since the extensor muscles are still fully functionally. Would there a decreased ability to straighten the fingers as opposed to total loss? Therefore the patient could slightly straighten finger III and IV but not with full extension? Thanks in advance  
Khalil Ali
over 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 riytde?1444773947
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Reflection

Just as a bit of an intro, my name is Conrad Hayes, I'm a 4th year medical student studying in Staffordshire. My medical school are quite big on getting us into the habit of writing down reflections. It's something I feel I do subconsciously whilst I'm with patients or in teaching sessions, but frankly I suck at the written bit and I feel on the whole it's probably because there's nobody discussing this with us or telling me I'm an idiot for some of the things I may think/say! So I think if I'm going to attempt to complete a blog then I am going to do it in a reflective style and I do look forward to peoples feedback and discussions. I'll try to do it daily and see if that works out well, or weekly. But hopefully even if it doesn't get much response it can just be a store for me to look back on things! (Providing I keep up with it). So I'll start now, with a short reflection on my career aspirations which have been pretty much firmed up, but today I gave a presentation that I felt really galvanised me into this. So I want to do Emergency Medicine and Expedition Medicine (on the side more than as my main job). Emergency Medicine appeals to me as I love primary care and being the first to see patients, but I want to see them when they're ill and have a role in the puzzle solving, as it were, that is their issues. Possibly more to the point I want to do this in a high pressure environment where acutely ill individuals come in, and I feel (having done placements in A&E and GP and AMU) A&E is the place for me to be. Expedition Medicine on the other hand is something I accidentally stumbled upon really. In 2nd year I was part of a podcast group MedHeads that we tried to set up at my medical school. I interviewed Dr Amy Hughes of Expedition & Wilderness Medicine, a UK company, and I got really excited about the concepts she was talking about. Practicing medicine in the middle of nowhere, limited resources and sometimes only personal accumen and ingenuity to help you through. It sounded perfect! And since then I've wanted to do it, particularly being interested in Mountain Medicine and getting involved with some research groups. Today in front of my group I gave a presentation on the effects of altitude on the brain (I'm on Neurology at the moment and we had to pick a topic that interested us). I spoke for 15 minutes, a concept that usually terrifies me truth be told, and I thoroughly enjoyed myself. Now I've given a fair number of presentations but this was the first time I was actively excited and really happy about talking! It seems to me that if that isn't the definition of why you should go for a job, then I need to talk to a careers advisor. This experience has definitely ensured I pursue this course with every resource I have available to me! I would be interested in hearing how other people feel about their careers panning out and what got them into it so feel free to leave a comment!!  
Conrad Hayes
over 7 years ago