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Podcast #9: Who Let the Dogs Out? (Wound Care)

45 year old man presents to the ED with a laceration to his finger. He was washing the dishes and a glass broke. There is a 1cm full thickness laceration on the pad of his index finger. The bleeding has stopped, skin edges look good, tetanus is up-to-date and he wants to know does he need stitches?  
thesgem.com
over 5 years ago
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SGEM#53: Sunday, Bloody Sunday (Epistaxis and Tranexamic Acid)

Guest Skeptic: Dr. Erich Hanel, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine at McMaster University and the newest member of the BEEM Dream Team  
thesgem.com
over 5 years ago
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Post-Tonsillectomy Hemorrhage - emdocs

We also know that the easiest, way to halt bleeding is to put some manual pressure on the source. Well,how do you put your finger on a bleeding tonsil?  
emdocs.net
over 5 years ago
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Guess or Gestalt in Major Trauma at St.Emlyn's - St.Emlyn's

I was recently fortunate enough to speak at the the Emergency Medicine Educators Conference in Coventry on a subject that continues to interest me, that of gestalt, judgement and clinical decision making. As I get older I increasingly realise that simply acquiring more knowledge and skills is not enough. What’s really important is how we use that information, how we make decisions, how we make mistakes and how we get it right. I’m also deep in my preparations for a talk at #SMACCUS on ‘Guess, Gestalt or Genius’ and so I’m always on the look out for studies in this area (as there are surprising few). In my talk in Coventry I used the question of when to activate the Major Haemorrhage Protocol (1:1:1 resuscitation as per PROPPR) in trauma patients. Clearly not all patients need it and there are potential harms if we use it on the wrong patients.  
stemlynsblog.org
over 5 years ago
Sinaiem dark
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aortic-stenosis

56 yo F with no PMHX, presents complaining of increased DOE and orthopnea for several weeks. She also reports intermittent, mild mucosal bleeding. She denies syncope. Physical exam is notable for an obvious crescendo- decrescendo murmur over the right sternal border. CXR shows an enlarged heart and pulmonary congestion.  
sinaiem.org
over 5 years ago
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CT Angiogram for evaluation of severe hematochezia

Introduction 0 Gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a common reason for ICU admission.  The approach to severe upper GI bleeding is relatively straightforward (f  
pulmcrit.org
over 5 years ago
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VL tecnique in suspect intracranial bleeding

In memory of Dr John Hinds  
prehospitalmed.com
over 5 years ago
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Post-Catheterization Hemoglobin Drop | Resus Review

Hemoglobin drop after catheterization may be a sign of life-threatening hemorrhage, but there may be benign or procedural causes.  
resusreview.com
over 5 years ago
3f9932bc487bacf0a2994848bfb05a19252c83aa3209784626200207
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GI Haemorrhage Slideshow: History, Examination, Management & Complications.

This slideshow covers history taking and examination, management, complications, pathophysiology of upper GI bleeding and classes of shock.  
Nicholas Shannon
over 5 years ago
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18

Management of subarachnoid hemorrhage with intracerebral hematoma

Stream Management of subarachnoid hemorrhage with intracerebral hematoma by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
feeds.bmj.com
over 5 years ago
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Carvedilol for primary prophylaxis of variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients

Stream Carvedilol for primary prophylaxis of variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients by BMJ talk medicine from desktop or your mobile device  
feeds.bmj.com
over 5 years ago
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Cardiac tissue grown on 'spider silk' substrate

Genetically engineered fibers of the protein spidroin, which is the construction material for spider webs, has proven to be a perfect substrate for cultivating heart tissue cells, a group of researchers has found. The cultivation of organs and tissues from a patient’s cells is the bleeding edge of medical research – regenerative methods can solve the problem of transplant rejection. However,it’s quite a challenge to find a suitable frame, or substrate, to grow cells on, researchers say.  
sciencedaily.com
over 5 years ago
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Nanoparticles That Control Internal Bleeding After Explosive Blasts |

Explosions are the primary way American soldiers get injured on the battlefield these days. Internal bleeding within the lungs is particularly dangerous an  
medgadget.com
over 5 years ago
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subarachnoid-hemorrhage-rational-approach

In October of 2010 the prestigious British Medical Journal published the largest, and by far the best, study ever done on the diagnosis of SAH in the ED. The data are revolutionary, and they prompted us to take a new look at the classic teaching and modern approach to this diagnosis.  
smartem.org
over 5 years ago
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Nanoparticles That Control Internal Bleeding After Explosive Blasts |

Explosions are the primary way American soldiers get injured on the battlefield these days. Internal bleeding within the lungs is particularly dangerous an  
feedproxy.google.com
over 5 years ago
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18

Is Topical Tranexamic Acid Better Than Nasal Packing for Anterior Epistaxis?

Is Topical Tranexamic Acid Better Than Nasal Packing for Anterior Epistaxis?  
acepnow.com
over 5 years ago
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Prophylactic Antibiotics for Epistaxis: Where’s the Evidence? - Emergency Physicians Monthly

Epistaxis is a common problem, with a lifetime incidence of about 60%. While the majority of cases do not require medical attention, epistaxis remains a common presenting complaint in the ED.  
epmonthly.com
over 5 years ago
Epistaxis1
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Nose Bleed Epistaxis

Epistaxis is a frequent complaint. 60% of the population will suffer from a nose bleed during their lifetime, and 6% will require medical attention. Outline of diagnosis and management in the emergency department setting.  
lifeinthefastlane.com
over 5 years ago
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Management of Epistaxis - American Family Physician

Family physicians frequently encounter patients with epistaxis (nasal bleeding). In rare cases, this condition may lead to massive bleeding and even death. Although epistaxis can have an anterior or posterior source, it most often originates in the anterior nasal cavity. A directed history and physical examination generally determine the cause of the bleeding. Both local and systemic processes can play a role in epistaxis. Nasal bleeding usually responds to first-aid measures such as compression. When epistaxis does not respond to simple measures, the source of the bleeding should be located and treated appropriately. Treatments to be considered include topical vasoconstriction, chemical cautery, electrocautery, nasal packing (nasal tampon or gauze impregnated with petroleum jelly), posterior gauze packing, use of a balloon system (including a modified Foley catheter), and arterial ligation or embolization. Topical or systemic antibiotics should be used in selected patients. Hospital admission should be considered for patients with significant comorbid conditions or complications of blood loss. Referral to an otolaryngologist is appropriate when bleeding is refractory, complications are present, or specialized treatment (balloon placement, arterial ligation, angiographic arterial embolization) is required.  
aafp.org
over 5 years ago
Eml epistaxis answers
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Epistaxis, “Answers”

 1. How do you differentiate an anterior from a posterior nosebleed? Whether you’re sitting high in the bleachers of a baseball game or treating a patient in the Emergency Department, nosebleeds can be an extremely frustrating, common, and sometimes even life-threatening disease process.  Nosebleeds have been reported to occur in over 60% of the general population…  
emlyceum.com
over 5 years ago