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1
10

Shotgun Histology Esophagus

Shotgun Histology Esophagus  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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1
17

Shotgun Histology Appendix

Shotgun Histology Appendix  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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1
17

Shotgun Histology Kidney

Shotgun Histology Kidney  
YouTube
over 5 years ago
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3
109

Histology-World! Histology Stains

A comprehensive, fun and entertaining site devoted exclusively to histology. Learning histology was never so easy! This site includes histology quizzes, histology games, slides, mnemonics, histology puzzles and tons of information about histology. One of the best histology sites on the internet!  
histology-world.com
about 5 years ago
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4
204

Histology Learning System - Common Confusions

Histology Learning System Appendix  
bu.edu
about 5 years ago
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0
17

shotgun histology - YouTube

istologia  
youtube.com
almost 5 years ago
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1
4

Renal Anatomy 3 - Glomerular Histology

http://www.handwrittentutorials.com - This is the third tutorial in the Renal Anatomy series. This video explores the histology of the glomerulus, and discus...  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
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1
42

ANATOMY; VISCERAL SMOOTH MUSCLE & CARDIAC MUSCLE HISTOLOGY by Professor Fink

In this Video-Lecture Professor Fink describes the Histology (Microanatomy) of Visceral Smooth Muscle and Cardiac Muscle, while comparing and contrasting the...  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
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1
36

Welcome to Histology at SIU SOM

This site provides histology resources serving the Southern Illinois University School of Medicine Year One Curriculum.  
siumed.edu
almost 5 years ago
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1
28

Renal cell carcinoma

The treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has changed greatly over the past 15 years. Progress in the surgical management of the primary tumor and increased understanding of the molecular biology and genomics of the disease have led to the development of new therapeutic agents. The management of the primary tumor has changed owing to the realization that clean margins around the primary lesion are sufficient to prevent local recurrence, as well as the development of more sophisticated tools and techniques that increase the safety of partial nephrectomy. The management of advanced disease has altered even more dramatically as a result of new agents that target the tumor vasculature or that attenuate the activation of intracellular oncogenic pathways. This review summarizes data from prospective randomized phase III studies on the surgical management and systemic treatment of RCC, and provides an up to date summary of the histology, genomics, staging, and prognosis of RCC. It describes the management of the primary tumor and offers an overview of systemic agents that form the mainstay of treatment for advanced disease. The review concludes with an introduction to the exciting new class of immunomodulatory agents that are currently in clinical trials and may form the basis of a new therapeutic approach for patients with advanced RCC.  
bmj.com
almost 5 years ago
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2
87

Clinical Anatomy Explained!

These videos explain difficult concepts of medical anatomy, embryology, neuroscience, and histology. They can help students learn anatomy and are also ideal ...  
YouTube
almost 5 years ago
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1
19

Histology

A brief but effective presentation of comparative histology for veterinary students, interns or residents reviewing for their specialty board exams or for a practitioner looking for an excellent quick reference source. This 100 page presentation boasts 39 chapters covering normal histology of the domestic animals and commonly seen exotics. Over 95 original full color drawings clearly and accurately present the normal morphology and organ differentiation of tissues. The presentation on classical embryology is especially helpful to student first learning this information. It is consistent with the Quick Look series, containing over 100 multiple choice questions to aid understanding. The well integrated CD-ROM contains over 250 full color tissue specimens which serve to further understanding on the topic.Published by Teton New Media in the USA and distributed by Manson Publishing outside of North America.  
Google Books
over 4 years ago
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1
55

National Kidney Foundation Primer on Kidney Diseases

The National Kidney Foundation Primer on Kidney Diseases is your ideal companion in clinical nephrology! From anatomy, histology, and physiology, through the diagnosis and management of kidney disease, fluid and electrolyte disorders, hypertension, dialysis, and kidney transplantation, this trusted manual from Elsevier and the National Kidney Foundation provides an accessible, efficient overview of kidney diseases that's perfect for residency, fellowship, clinical practice, and board review. Incorporate the latest NKF Kidney/ Outcome Quality Initiative guidelines on chronic kidney disease staging and management. Review the basics with a current and practical review of the anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of kidney disease, fluid and electrolyte disorders, hypertension, dialysis, and renal transplantation. Put the latest knowledge to work in your practice with 8 brand-new chapters including kidney development, assessment of kidney function in acute and chronic settings, the kidney in malignancy, acute tubular injury and acute tubular necrosis, acute interstitial nephritis, Fabry Disease, immunosuppression, and transplant infectious disease, as well as comprehensive updates on acute kidney injury, transplant medicine, kidney function and kidney disease in the elderly, GFR estimation, biomarkers in kidney disease, recently described pathologic targets in membranous nephropathy, minimal change disease, viral nephropathies, and much more! Get expert advice from a new team of editors, led by Scott Gilbert and Dan Weiner from Tufts University School of Medicine, each bringing a fresh perspective and a wealth of clinical experience. Quickly access the complete contents online at Expert Consult, with fully searchable text, downloadable images, and additional figures and graphs.  
Google Books
over 4 years ago
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1
18

Histology Video: Bladder

A comprehensive, fun and entertaining site devoted exclusively to histology. Learning histology was never so easy! This site includes histology quizzes, histology games, slides, mnemonics, histology puzzles and tons of information about histology. One of the best histology sites on the internet!  
histology-world.com
over 4 years ago
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1
19

Histology Video Lectures Series by Dr. William J. Krause

<!-- google_ad_client = "pub-7080753133094481"; google_ad_width = 468; google_ad_height = 15; google_ad_format = "468x15_0ads_al"; //2007-10-08: IHC-HistologyVideo google_ad_channel = "5226247853"; google_color_border = "FFFFFF"; google_color_bg = "FFFFFF"; google_color_link = "003366"; google_color_text = "000000"; google_color_url = "215670"; //-->    
ihcworld.com
over 4 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 1f9109k?1444774063
2
2540

Criticizing the NHS - Can students do this productively?

In this month’s SBMJ (May 2013) a GP called Dr Michael Ingram has written a very good article highlighting some of the problems with the modern NHS’s administrative systems, especially relating to the huge amount of GP time wasted on following up after administrative errors and failings. I personally think that it is important for people working within the NHS to write articles like this because without them then many of us would be unaware of these problems or would feel less confident in voicing our own similar thoughts. The NHS is a fantastic idea and does provide an excellent service compared to many other health care systems around the world, but there is always room for improvement – especially on the administrative side! The issues raised by Dr Ingram were: Histology specimens being analysed but reports not being sent to the GP on time or with the correct information. Histology reports not being discussed with patient’s directly when they try and contact the hospital to find out the results and instead being referred to their GP, who experiences the problem stated above. GP’s are being left to deal with patient’s problems that have nothing to do with the GP and their job and have everything to do with an inefficient NHS bureaucracy. These problems and complaints often taking up to a third of a GP’s working day and thereby reducing the time they can spend actually treating patients. Having to arrange new outpatient appointments for patients when their appointment letters went missing or when appointments were never made etc. Even getting outpatient appointments in the first place and how these are often delayed well after the recommended 6 week wait. Patients who attend outpatient appointments often have to consult their GP to get a prescription that the hospital consultant has recommended, so that the GP bares the cost and not the hospital. My only issue with this article is that Dr Ingram highlights a number of problems with the NHS systems but then does not offer a single solution/idea on how these systems could be improved. When medical students are taught to write articles for publication it is drummed into us that we should always finish the discussion section with a conclusion and recommendations for further work/ implications for practice. I was just thinking that if doctors, medical students, nurses and NHS staff want to complain about the NHS’s failings then at least suggest some ways of improving these problems at the same time. This then turns what is essentially a complaint/rant into helpful, potentially productive criticism. If you (the staff) have noticed that these problems exist then you have also probably given some thought to why the problem exists, so why not just say/write how you think the issue could be resolved? If your grievances and solutions are documented and available then someone in the NHS administration might take your idea up and actually put it into practice, potentially reducing the problem (a disgustingly idealist thought I know). A number of times I have been told during medical school lectures and at key note speeches at conferences that medical students are a valuable resource to the NHS administration because we visit different hospitals, we wander around the whole hospital, we get exposed to the good and bad practice and we do not have any particular loyalty to any one department and can therefore objective observations. So, I was thinking it might be interesting to ask as many medical students as possible for their thoughts on how to improve the systems within the NHS. So I implore any of you reading this blog: write your own blog about short comings that you have noticed, make a recommendation for how to improve it and then maybe leave a link in the comments below this blog. If we start taking more of an interest in the NHS around us and start documenting where improvements could be made then maybe we could together work to create a more efficient and effective NHS. So I briefly just sat down and had a think earlier today about a few potential solutions for the problems highlighted in Dr Ingram’s article. A community pathology team that handles all of the GP’s pathology specimens and referrals. A “patient pathway co-ordinator” could be employed as additional administrative staff by GP surgeries to chase up all of the appointments and missing information that is currently using up a lot of the GP’s time and thereby freeing them to see more patients. I am sure this role is already carried out by admin staff in GP practices but perhaps in an ad hoc way, rather than that being their entire job. Do the majority of GP practices get access to the hospitals computer systems? Surely, if GPs had access to the hospital systems this would mean a greater efficiency for booking outpatient appointments and for allowing GPs to follow up test results etc. In the few outpatient departments I have come across outpatient appointments are often made by the administration team and then sent by letter to the patients, with the patient not being given a choice of when is good for them. Would it not be more efficient for the administrative staff to send the patients a number of appointment options for the patient to select one appropriate for them? Eliyahu M. Goldratt was a business consultant who revolutionized manufacturing efficiency a few years ago. He wrote a number of books on his theories that are very interesting and easy to read because he tries to explain most of his points using a narrative – “The Goal” and “Critical Chain” being just tow. His business theories focussed on finding the bottle neck in an industrial process, because if that is the rate limiting step in the manufacturing process then it is the most essential part for improving efficiency of the whole process. Currently, most GPs refer patients to outpatient appointments at hospitals and this can often take weeks or months. The outpatient appointments are a bottle neck in the process of getting patients the care they require. Therefore, focussing attention on how outpatient appointments are co-ordinated and run would improve the efficiency in the “patient pathway” as a whole. a. Run more outpatient clinics. b. Pay consultants overtime to do more clinics, potentially in the evenings or at weekends. While a lot may not want to do this, a few may volunteer and help to reduce the back log on the waiting lists. c. Have more patients seen by nurse specialists so that more time is freed up for the consultants to see the more urgent or serious patients. d. An obvious, yet expensive solution, hire more consultants to help with the ever increasing workload. e. Change the outpatient system so that it becomes more of an assembly line system with one doctor and a team of nurses handling the “new patient” appointments and another team handling the “old patient” follow up appointments rather than having them all mixed together at the same time. I am sure that there are many criticisms of the points I have written above and I would be interested to hear them. I would also love to hear any other solutions for the problems mentioned above. Final thought for today … Why shouldn’t medical students make criticisms of inefficiencies and point them out to the relevant administrator? If anyone else is interested in how the NHS as a whole is run then there is a new organisation called the Faculty of Medical Leadership and Management that is keen to recruit interested student members (www.fmlm.ac.uk).  
jacob matthews
over 6 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 qo3u6t?1444774095
3
916

Prostate and Bladder Cancer Staging and Grading - A review for students

Amended from Wikipedia and other sources T.I Lemon Stage means spread Grade means histology Prostate cancer staging – spread of the cancer There are two schemes commonly used to stage prostate cancer. TMN and Whitmore Jewett Stage I disease is cancer that is found incidentally in a small part of the sample when prostate tissue was removed for other reasons, such as benign prostatic hypertrophy, and the cells closely resemble normal cells and the gland feels normal to the examining finger Stage II more of the prostate is involved and a lump can be felt within the gland. Stage III, the tumour has spread through the prostatic capsule and the lump can be felt on the surface of the gland. In Stage IV disease, the tumour has invaded nearby structures, or has spread to lymph nodes or other organs. Grading - Gleason Grading System is based on cellular content and tissue architecture from biopsies, which provides an estimate of the destructive potential and ultimate prognosis of the disease. TX: cannot evaluate the primary tumor T0: no evidence of tumor T1: tumor present, but not detectable clinically or with imaging • T1a: tumor was incidentally found in less than 5% of prostate tissue resected (for other reasons) • T1b: tumor was incidentally found in greater than 5% of prostate tissue resected • T1c: tumor was found in a needle biopsy performed due to an elevated serum PSA T2: the tumor can be felt (palpated) on examination, but has not spread outside the prostate • T2a: the tumor is in half or less than half of one of the prostate gland's two lobes • T2b: the tumor is in more than half of one lobe, but not both • T2c: the tumor is in both lobes but within the prostatic capsule • T3: the tumor has spread through the prostatic capsule (if it is only part-way through, it is still T2) • T3a: the tumor has spread through the capsule on one or both sides • T3b: the tumor has invaded one or both seminal vesicles • T4: the tumor has invaded other nearby structures It should be stressed that the designation "T2c" implies a tumor which is palpable in both lobes of the prostate. Tumors which are found to be bilateral on biopsy only but which are not palpable bilaterally should not be staged as T2c. Evaluation of the regional lymph nodes ('N') NX: cannot evaluate the regional lymph nodes • N0: there has been no spread to the regional lymph nodes • N1: there has been spread to the regional lymph nodes Evaluation of distant metastasis ('M') • MX: cannot evaluate distant metastasis • M0: there is no distant metastasis • M1: there is distant metastasis • M1a: the cancer has spread to lymph nodes beyond the regional ones • M1b: the cancer has spread to bone • M1c: the cancer has spread to other sites (regardless of bone involvement) Evaluation of the histologic grade ('G') Usually, the grade of the cancer (how different the tissue is from normal tissue) is evaluated separately from the stage; however, for prostate cancer, grade information is used in conjunction with TNM status to group cases into four overall stages. • GX: cannot assess grade • G1: the tumor closely resembles normal tissue (Gleason 2–4) • G2: the tumor somewhat resembles normal tissue (Gleason 5–6) • G3–4: the tumor resembles normal tissue barely or not at all (Gleason 7–10) Of note, this system of describing tumors as "well-", "moderately-", and "poorly-" differentiated based on Gleason score of 2-4, 5-6, and 7-10, respectively, persists in SEER and other databases but is generally outdated. In recent years pathologists rarely assign a tumor a grade less than 3, particularly in biopsy tissue. A more contemporary consideration of Gleason grade is: • Gleason 3+3: tumor is low grade (favorable prognosis) • Gleason 3+4 / 3+5: tumor is mostly low grade with some high grade • Gleason 4+3 / 5+3: tumor is mostly high grade with some low grade • Gleason 4+4 / 4+5 / 5+4 / 5+5: tumor is all high grade Note that under current guidelines, if any Pattern 5 is present it is included in final score, regardless of the percentage of the tissue having this pattern, as the presence of any pattern 5 is considered to be a poor prognostic marker. Overall staging The tumor, lymph node, metastasis, and grade status can be combined into four stages of worsening severity. Stage Tumor Nodes Metastasis Grade Stage I T1a N0 M0 G1 Stage II T1a N0 M0 G2–4 T1b N0 M0 Any G T1c N0 M0 Any G T1 N0 M0 Any G T2 N0 M0 Any G Stage III T3 N0 M0 Any G Stage IV T4 N0 M0 Any G Any T N1 M0 Any G Any T Any N M1 Any G Bladder T (Primary tumour) • TX Primary tumour cannot be assessed • T0 No evidence of primary tumour • Ta Non-invasive papillary carcinoma • Tis Carcinoma in situ (‘flat tumour’) • T1 Tumour invades subepithelial connective tissue • T2a Tumour invades superficial muscle (inner half) • T2b Tumour invades deep muscle (outer half) • T3 Tumour invades perivesical tissue: • T3a Microscopically • T3b Macroscopically (extravesical mass) • T4a Tumour invades prostate, uterus or vagina • T4b Tumour invades pelvic wall or abdominal wall N (Lymph nodes) • NX Regional lymph nodes cannot be assessed • N0 No regional lymph node metastasis • N1 Metastasis in a single lymph node 2 cm or less in greatest dimension • N2 Metastasis in a single lymph node more than 2 cm but not more than 5 cm in greatest dimension,or multiple lymph nodes, none more than 5 cm in greatest dimension • N3 Metastasis in a lymph node more than 5 cm in greatest dimension M (Distant metastasis) • MX Distant metastasis cannot be assessed • M0 No distant metastasis • M1 Distant metastasis. Grade Urothelial papilloma – non cancerous (benign) tumour •Papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP) – very slow growing and unlikely to spread •Low grade papillary urothelial carcinoma – slow growing and unlikely to spread •High grade papillary urothelial carcinoma – more quickly growing and more likely to spread  
Thomas Lemon
almost 6 years ago
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0
15

Mesothelioma - Location, Characteristics & Histology

http://usmlefasttrack.com/?p=6068 Mesothelioma, -, Location,, Characteristics, &, Histology, Findings, symptoms, findings, causes, mnemonics, review, what is...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
Bd8c56a0535bb4316bf28043cccbb77b07cf5cad947765618907347
1
35

Trachea histology

Trachea wall stained with H-E.  
Laura Beth Martin
over 4 years ago