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ImmuneSystem

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52
5782

Immune system flow chart

 
myvmc.com
almost 5 years ago
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32
842

M. tuberculosis

This is a project I did for a PBL session. I wanted to explain the ways in which the tuberculosis bacterium infects the body and causes symptoms in an interesting and fun way. I have dyslexia and a visual learner and I find that I take in information more effectively when diagrams or pictures are used. I’m also a huge fan of comic book which is why I chose to use this as a medium to present this information. This comic illustrates M.Tuberculosis’s journey through the body and his battle with the host immune system.  
Rosanna Baker-Wilding
about 9 years ago
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811

Immunology P.O.M.

New Lecture: Immune System: Self/Non-self Recognition • Living: Conservation of several processes. Determines mechanisms from organisms ◦ Autopoieses or the dy…  
Kip Mouldey
about 6 years ago
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15
356

Immunology Overview

The basics of the immune system.  
YouTube
over 6 years ago
29985
14
843

Animation of Initiation of Atherosclerosis - Macrophage Activation 2

This animation shows a simplified version of the macrophage's role in the initiation of atherosclerosis. In an atherosclerotic-prone blood vessel, macrophages invade the subendothelial space. Oxidised Low-Density Lipoproteins (oxLDL) present within the vessel wall will bind to scavenger receptors on the macrophage's surface, such as CD36. This will activate the macrophage, and it will phagocytose the oxLDL. As this process continues, the macrophage increases in size and forms a Foam Cell, which is too large to pass between the endothelial cells back into the lumen. Therefore, the foam cells remain in the subendothelial space and are the main cells present within an atherosclerotic plaque. *** Done for Student Selected Component (SSC), University of Aberdeen. Year 2. 2011. Made in Adobe Photoshop CS2 and Adobe Imageready.  
Victoria Lee
about 9 years ago
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8
416

Immunology Overview

Fantastic hand-drawn tutorial covering the basics of the immune system.  
YouTube
over 6 years ago
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7
218

Immunology - Innate Immunity (Inflammatory Response)

Describes the Inflammatory Response of the Innate Immune System.  
Nicole Chalmers
over 6 years ago
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7
258

Overview of the Immune System

This video gives a great overview of the cells and functions of the immune system in response to a pathogen.  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
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6
218

Immunology & Schistosomiasis (Bilharzia)

An interactive learning resource that explores the life cycle of the Schistosoma mansoni parasite and how it exploits the human immune system in order to survive. All links are back up and running. Please let me know if you experience any diffuclties. Thank you!  
Daniel Sapier
over 9 years ago
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6
487

Innate immunity and normal flora (Medical Microbiology and Infection)

The innate immune system, which consists of the normal flora, physical barriers such as the skin, antibacterial proteins and phagocytic cells, is an important defence mechanism against infection. Many responses to ‘harm’ are detected by pattern recognition molecules such as […]  
what-when-how.com
over 5 years ago
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5
157

Cells of the Immune System

http://www.handwrittentutorials.com - This tutorial looks at the differentiation of the cells of the immune system. Beginning with the stem cell, the tutorials maps the differentiation of the cells to their functional state. For more entirely FREE tutorials and accompanying PDFs visit http://www.handwrittentutorials.com  
Handwritten Tutorial Videos
over 6 years ago
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5
166

Lymphatic System 1, Tissue fluid

If you would like to get hold of my books, one on Physiology and another on Pathophysiology, check out my web site campbellteaching.co.uk Funds from selling ...  
YouTube
about 6 years ago
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5
284

Probiotics - There's a New Superhero in Town!

When you think of the term 'bacteria', it immediately conjures up an image of a faceless, ruthless enemy-one that requires your poor body to maintain constant vigilance, fighting the good fight forever and always. And should you happen to lose the battle, well, the after effects are always messy. But what some people might not know is that bacteria are our silent saviours as well. These 'good' bacteria are known as probiotics, where 'pro' means 'for' and 'bios' is 'life'. The WHO defines probiotics as "live micro-organisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health bene?t on the host". Discovered by the Russian scientist Metchnikoff in the 20th century; simply put, probiotics are micro-organisms such as bacteria or yeast, which improve the health of an individual. Our bodies contain more than 500 different species of bacteria which serve to maintain our health by keeping harmful pathogens in check, supporting the immune system and helping in digestion and absorption of nutrients. From the very first breath you take, you are exposed to probiotics. How so? As an infant passes through it's mother's birth canal, it receives a good dose of healthy bacteria, which in turn serve to populate it's own gastro-intestinal tract. However, unfortunately, as we go through life, our exposure to overly processed foods, anti-bacterial products, sterilized and pasteurized food etc, might mean that in our zeal to have everything sanitary and hygienic, we might be depriving ourselves of the beneficial effects of such microorganisms. For any health care provider, the focus should not only be on eradicating disease but improving overall health as well. Here, probiotic containing foods and supplements play an important role as they not only combat diseases but also confer better health in general. Self dosing yourself with bacteria might sound a little bizarre at first-after all, we take antibiotics to fight bacteria. But let's not forget that long before probiotics became a viable medical option, our grandparents (and their parents before them) advocated the intake of yoghurt drinks (lassi). The fermented milk acts as an instant probiotic delivery system to the body! Although they are still being studied, probiotics may help several specific illnesses, studies show. They have proven useful in treating childhood diarrheas as well as antibiotic associated diarrhea. Clinical trial results are mixed, but several small studies suggest that certain probiotics may help maintain remission of ulcerative colitis and prevent relapse of Crohn’s disease and the recurrence of pouchitis (a complication of surgery during treatment of ulcerative colitis). They may also help to maintain a healthy urogenital system, preventing problems such as vaginitis and UTIs. Like all things, probiotics may have their disadvantages too. They are considered dangerous for people with impaired immune systems and one must take care to ensure that the correct strain of bacteria related to their required health benefit is present in such supplements. But when all is said and done and all the pros and cons of probiotics are weighed; stand back ladies and gentlemen, there's a new superhero in town, and what's more-it's here to stay!  
Huda Qadir
over 6 years ago
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4
663

Immuno Complement: Easy Tutorial Mnemonic Animation | Immunology: Membrane Attack Complex (MAC)

Complement of the innate immune system forms a membrane attack complex against pathogens. The activated cascade is initiated from classic, alternative, or mannose binding lectin (MBL) pathways. Please SUBSCRIBE for new videos: more cool stuff coming as we get more users. http://www.helphippo.com - for more video tutorials organized by topic/year. Watch our immunology playlist at: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLIPkjUW-piR1ZGTqzyz--S3CnMhSiGOxF  
HelpHippo.com
over 6 years ago
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4
91

B Lymphocytes (B cells)

Overview of B cells (B lymphocytes) and how they are activated and produce antibodies More free lessons at: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=Z36dUduOk1Y  
YouTube
over 6 years ago
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4
174

Asthma and COPD - Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology

A review of the pathology of asthma and COPD, including the role of the immune system, along with the mechanisms behind the hypercapnia and hypoxemia of COPD...  
youtube.com
about 5 years ago
2
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2 6 Antibiotics I Medical Microbiology

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Nicole Chalmers
over 6 years ago
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3
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Immune Response | Geeky Medics

An illustrated guide to the cells of the immune system and the components of the normal immune response, complete with a super helpful summary diagram  
Geeky Medics
over 5 years ago
Foo20151013 2023 184etvn?1444773944
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Aspergillus and Human Health

Many may be familiar with aspergillosis as the infecting agent in acute cases where the patient is severely immunocompromised - but there is more to this fungus' repertoire. There are rare cases where the patient's immune system is overwhelmed by a large inhalation of spores e.g. after gardening, but these are insignificant in terms of total numbers effected. The following are far more common:- Aspergillus and other fungi are increasingly identified as the active agent in sinusitis - if you have cases that don't respond to antibiotics this is worth thinking about. Chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA & aspergilloma) is an infection of immunocompetent people, causing respiratory difficulty, coughing and haemoptysis. The UK NHS has a specialist centre for these patients In Manchester (National Aspergillosis Centre (NAC)). NAC has particular expertise and extensive facilities for the diagnosis of CPA, ABPA, SAFS and use of systemic antifungal drugs. Allergic infection (Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis - ABPA and chronic sinusitis) is thought to be heavily underdiagnosed and undertreated. ABPA is particularly common in Asthma, Cystic Fibrosis patients and those with bronchiectasis. There is estimated to be 25 000 cases in the UK alone. Many (50%) of the most severe asthma cases are sensitive to fungi (SAFS) - in particular Aspergillus. These tend to be the most unstable cases that don't respond to antibiotics and several studies have been published that show giving an antifungal helps reduce the use of steroids for these patients. Last but not least - Tuberculosis is on the rise in the UK and the rest of the world. It is estimated that 2% of cases progress to CPA and should be treated using an antifungal - this is usually not done until considerable time has passed and much damage has been done. In total it is estimated that many millions of people across the world suffer from aspergillus - ABPA - 5 million, Tb - 400 000 per year and Asthma (SAFS - 1 - 4 million cases in EU & US). Sinusitis cases may number many tens of millions worldwide. So - the next time you assume aspergillus infections and aspergillosis are rare and confined to those who are profoundly immunocompromised - think again! If you have a patient who has increasingly severe respiratory symptoms, doesn't respond to multiple courses of antibiotics then give aspergillus a thought. Browse around these articles for further information Aspergillus Website Treatment Section. NB For a broader look at the prevalence of fungal diseases worldwide the new charity Leading International Fungal Education (LIFE) website is worth looking at.  
Graham Atherton
over 7 years ago