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OcuMet Beacon Leads to Earlier Detection of Retinal Disorders: an Interview |

OcuSciences, based in Ann Arbor, MI, has developed an instrument that will provide information to enable earlier diagnosis of eye conditions including glau  
medgadget.com
over 3 years ago
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6

Obesity, Diabetes Continue to Rise, CDC Survey Shows

The National Health Interview Survey has identified troubling findings regarding some health measures and reassuring information about other health measures.  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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6

Jeremy Hunt interview: Still a safe pair of hands?

Jeremy Hunt is a health secretary under pressure. In this exclusive interview with The BMJ’s editor in chief Fiona Godlee, the man who could soon become the longest serving health secretary insists he has more to give.Gareth Iacobuccireports  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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7

QuickStats: Percentage of Adults with Fair or Poor Health, by Home Ownership Status and Age Group — National Health Interview Survey, United States, 2014 | MMWR

The Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) Series is prepared by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  
cdc.gov
over 3 years ago
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7

Surgery Tops Drugs for Glycemic Control at 5 Years: STAMPEDE

The study "confirms the ongoing benefit of bariatric surgery," said one observer in an interview. Now, "what we really need to know now is health economics and cardiovascular outcomes."  
medscape.com
over 3 years ago
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7

Mark Porter interview: the government will realise its mistake

Ahead of the first all-out strike by junior doctors in NHS history, Abi Rimmer spoke to the BMA council chair, Mark Porter, about life after the dispute  
feeds.bmj.com
over 3 years ago
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14

WHAT A PITTY! POPE FRANCIS’ REAFFIRMs IN “AMORIS LAETITIA” THE BAN On CONTRACEPTION BY THE CATHOLIC CHURCH.

On April 8th Vatican released the long awaited publication by Pope Francis “Amoris Laetitia” (The Joy of Love). This very lengthy and comprehensive document deals with the many issues facing the family. There are many beautiful passages in it about a large number of issues. Many catholics around the world will be pleased to read about the Pope’s (Church’s) much more open and progressive views of such issues as divorce and homosexuality amongst many other issues. But in fact nothing has changed. In this document the Pope reaffirms the position of the Roman Catholic Church regarding the use of artificial methods of contraception. This statement is certainly very disappointing to many catholics. Only natural methods of family planning, the so called “fertility awareness methods” are condoned by the Catholic Church. That is just fine for motivated and somewhat educated couples, with some access to medical care and teaching; also this approach works best if the women has regular menstrual cycles. Medical advances have made these methods more sophisticated and precise than the original method, based on just counting the days of the menstrual cycle and abstaining from intercourse on the so called fertile days. Under ideal circumstances these natural methods have a high success and low failure rate, equal or better than some artificial methods. And many couples who use it are very satisfied with it, even though they still require a considerable amount of effort. Under less than ideal circumstances however, these natural methods have a high and unacceptable failure rate. This is true in our own country but especially in developing countries and areas (like refugee camps) where people live in squalor, lack food and most basic living needs, have no or inadequate medical care, and women often have very irregular or absent menstrual cycles, so that the natural methods of family planning become utterly impractical. Yet the Catholic Church insists that only these natural methods are acceptable. During his return last year from a visit to the Philippines, Pope Francis made the somewhat unexpected statement that catholic families would do well to limit their families to a manageable size. A most welcome recommendation indeed! However, during the same interview Pope Francis again reaffirmed the opposition by the Church to any form of artificial birth control. How then are the people living under less than ideal circumstances as I described above, supposed to adhere to the Pope’s recommendations to limit the seize of their family? The natural methods have a high failure rate under these conditions. It seems to me that the Pope (and the Catholic Church) can not have it both ways and place these people before a very unfair dilemma. Either adhere to the Church’s teaching and attempt to use the natural methods of family planning that are allowed, but in doing so risk an unwanted pregnancy, or ignore the teaching and use the many artificial methods available and in doing so be marginalized by the Church to which they belong. A very large number of professed catholics world-wide are choosing the latter option, and that includes me. Many of the catholic priests, with whom I have discussed this issue will tell me to ignore the Church’s teaching, follow my conscience, and continue with my practice of prescribing artificial methods of contraception and carrying out permanent sterilization procedures. (I am a gynecologist). That is of course just fine for me, but in the overall picture of things, it makes no sense. If rules, regulation, and laws are such that a vast majority of people, including those in position of authority are ignoring them, is it then not time for the leadership to seriously review and hopefully modify the rules? That, to me and to many of my catholic colleagues and patients, seems only logical. In that sense the recent publication by Pope Francis is certainly most disappointing.  
DR William LeMaire
over 3 years ago
12
1
14

WHAT A PITTY! POPE FRANCIS’ REAFFIRMs IN “AMORIS LAETITIA” THE BAN On CONTRACEPTION BY THE CATHOLIC CHURCH.

On April 8th Vatican released the long awaited publication by Pope Francis “Amoris Laetitia” (The Joy of Love). This very lengthy and comprehensive document deals with the many issues facing the family. There are many beautiful passages in it about a large number of issues. Many catholics around the world will be pleased to read about the Pope’s (Church’s) much more open and progressive views of such issues as divorce and homosexuality amongst many other issues. But in fact nothing has changed. In this document the Pope reaffirms the position of the Roman Catholic Church regarding the use of artificial methods of contraception. This statement is certainly very disappointing to many catholics. Only natural methods of family planning, the so called “fertility awareness methods” are condoned by the Catholic Church. That is just fine for motivated and somewhat educated couples, with some access to medical care and teaching; also this approach works best if the women has regular menstrual cycles. Medical advances have made these methods more sophisticated and precise than the original method, based on just counting the days of the menstrual cycle and abstaining from intercourse on the so called fertile days. Under ideal circumstances these natural methods have a high success and low failure rate, equal or better than some artificial methods. And many couples who use it are very satisfied with it, even though they still require a considerable amount of effort. Under less than ideal circumstances however, these natural methods have a high and unacceptable failure rate. This is true in our own country but especially in developing countries and areas (like refugee camps) where people live in squalor, lack food and most basic living needs, have no or inadequate medical care, and women often have very irregular or absent menstrual cycles, so that the natural methods of family planning become utterly impractical. Yet the Catholic Church insists that only these natural methods are acceptable. During his return last year from a visit to the Philippines, Pope Francis made the somewhat unexpected statement that catholic families would do well to limit their families to a manageable size. A most welcome recommendation indeed! However, during the same interview Pope Francis again reaffirmed the opposition by the Church to any form of artificial birth control. How then are the people living under less than ideal circumstances as I described above, supposed to adhere to the Pope’s recommendations to limit the seize of their family? The natural methods have a high failure rate under these conditions. It seems to me that the Pope (and the Catholic Church) can not have it both ways and place these people before a very unfair dilemma. Either adhere to the Church’s teaching and attempt to use the natural methods of family planning that are allowed, but in doing so risk an unwanted pregnancy, or ignore the teaching and use the many artificial methods available and in doing so be marginalized by the Church to which they belong. A very large number of professed catholics world-wide are choosing the latter option, and that includes me. Many of the catholic priests, with whom I have discussed this issue will tell me to ignore the Church’s teaching, follow my conscience, and continue with my practice of prescribing artificial methods of contraception and carrying out permanent sterilization procedures. (I am a gynecologist). That is of course just fine for me, but in the overall picture of things, it makes no sense. If rules, regulation, and laws are such that a vast majority of people, including those in position of authority are ignoring them, is it then not time for the leadership to seriously review and hopefully modify the rules? That, to me and to many of my catholic colleagues and patients, seems only logical. In that sense the recent publication by Pope Francis is certainly most disappointing.  
DR William LeMaire
over 3 years ago
13
1
12

ARTIFICIAL CONTRACEPTION STILL BANNED BY THE CATHOLIC CHURCH.

WHAT A PITTY AND A MISSED OPPORTUNITY. POPE FRANCIS’ REAFFIRMS IN “AMORIS LAETITIA” THE BAN ON CONTRACEPTION BY THE CATHOLIC CHURCH. On April 8th Vatican released the long awaited publication by Pope Francis “Amoris Laetitia” (The Joy of Love). This very lengthy and comprehensive document deals with the many issues facing the family. There are many beautiful passages in it about a large number of issues. Many catholics around the world will be pleased to read about the Pope’s (Church’s) much more open and progressive views of such issues as divorce and homosexuality amongst many other issues. But in fact nothing has changed. In this document the Pope reaffirms the position of the Roman Catholic Church regarding the use of artificial methods of contraception. This statement is certainly very disappointing to many catholics and to catholic medical care givers. Only natural methods of family planning, the so called “fertility awareness methods” are condoned by the Catholic Church. That is just fine for motivated and somewhat educated couples, with some access to medical care and teaching; also this approach works best if the women has regular menstrual cycles. Medical advances have made these methods more sophisticated and precise than the original method, based on just counting the days of the menstrual cycle and abstaining from intercourse on the so called fertile days. Under ideal circumstances these natural methods have a high success and low failure rate, equal or better than some artificial methods. And many couples who use it are very satisfied with it, even though they still require a considerable amount of effort. Under less than ideal circumstances however, these natural methods have a high and unacceptable failure rate. This is true in our own country but especially in developing countries and areas (like refugee camps) where people live in squalor, lack food and most basic living needs, have no or inadequate medical care, and women often have very irregular or absent menstrual cycles, so that the natural methods of family planning become utterly impractical. Yet the Catholic Church insists that only these natural methods are acceptable. During his return last year from a visit to the Philippines, Pope Francis made the somewhat unexpected statement that catholic families would do well to limit their families to a manageable size. A most welcome recommendation indeed! However, during the same interview Pope Francis again reaffirmed the opposition by the Church to any form of artificial birth control. How then are the people living under less than ideal circumstances as I described above, supposed to adhere to the Pope’s recommendations to limit the seize of their family? The natural methods have a high failure rate under these conditions. It seems to me that the Pope (and the Catholic Church) can not have it both ways and place these people before a very unfair dilemma. Either adhere to the Church’s teaching and attempt to use the natural methods of family planning that are allowed, but in doing so risk an unwanted pregnancy, or ignore the teaching and use the many artificial methods available and in doing so be marginalized by the Church to which they belong. A very large number of professed catholics world-wide are choosing the latter option, and that includes me. Some of the catholic priests, with whom I have discussed this issue will tell me to ignore the Church’s teaching, follow my conscience, and continue with my practice of prescribing artificial methods of contraception and carrying out permanent sterilization procedures. (I am a gynecologist). That is of course just fine for me, but in the overall picture of things, it makes no sense. If rules, regulation, and laws are such that a vast majority of people, including those in position of authority are ignoring them, is it then not time for the leadership to seriously review and hopefully modify the rules? That, to me and to many of my catholic colleagues and patients, seems only logical. In that sense the recent publication by Pope Francis is certainly most disappointing. William J. LeMaire MD Emeritus Professor Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology University of Miami Miller School of Medicine  
DR William LeMaire
over 3 years ago
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10

'There's no point giving free cancer drugs to Africa' - BBC News

In an interview with the BBC News website, AstraZeneca boss Pascal Soriot talks about how it is an exciting time for the cancer drugs world, but says there is no point giving free drugs to Africa.  
bbc.co.uk
over 3 years ago