New to Meducation?
Sign up
Already signed up? Log In

Category

Default
4
212

Errors in Emergency Medicine: Rapid Sequence Intubation

*Rapid Sequence Intubation* Rapid sequence intubation (RSI) is a medical procedure involving a prompt induction of general anesthesia and subsequent intubati...  
youtube.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
1

Comparison of two muscle relaxants, rocuronium and succinylcholine, to facilitate rapid sequence induction intubation | Cochrane

Which drug (rocuronium or succinylcholine) is better at providing excellent conditions to quickly insert breathing tubes into participants of all ages for elective and emergency situations?  
cochrane.org
over 4 years ago
2
1
0

When life gives you LEMONs- Predicting difficult intubations in the ED

Reed MJ, Dunn MJ, & McKeown DW. Can an Airway Assessment Score Predict Difficulty at Intubation in the Emergency Department? Emerg Med J 2005; 22(2): 99 – 102.  
blogs.brown.edu
over 4 years ago
Pharm logo 1400x1400
0
0

Cricoid Pressure RCT in Australia by Dr Chris Trethewy -Startling RESULTS!

Chris Trethewy Cricoid Pressure from John Mackenzie on Vimeo. Here is his study protocol Effectiveness of cricoid pressure in preventing gastric aspiration during rapid sequence intubation in the emergency department: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial  
prehospitalmed.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

Utility of a Gum-Elastic Bougie for Difficult Airway Management in Infants: A Simulation-Based Crossover Analysis

Great open access article on bougies in paediatric intubations Utility of a Gum-Elastic Bougie for Difficult Airway Management in Infants: A Simulation-Based Crossover Analysis  
prehospitalmed.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

FELLOW trial (is this the end of apnoeic oxygenation?)- The Bottom Line

Celia Bradford reviews the FELLOW trial of Apneic Oxygenation for Intubation in ICU patients and described the strengths, weaknesses and the bottom line Source: FELLOW trial (is this the end of apnoeic oxygenation?)- The Bottom Line  
prehospitalmed.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

FELLOW trial THE BOTTOM LINE

Celia Bradford reviews the FELLOW trial of Apneic Oxygenation for Intubation in ICU patients and described the strengths, weaknesses and the bottom line  
intensivecarenetwork.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

DL vs VL ? or Both?…Perhaps not..read on!

A comparison of the ease of tracheal intubation using a McGrath MAC® laryngoscope and a standard Macintosh laryngoscope  
prehospitalmed.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

Learning and Mastering Nasotracheal Intubations

Learning and Mastering Nasotracheal Intubations Dex and ketamine work well for sedation. http://t.co/tBV2JeeCkj pic.twitter.com/fHzz4vGQx0— Charles Bruen (@ResusReview) October 15, 2015 //platform.twitter.com/widgets.js  
prehospitalmed.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
2

New difficult intubation guidelines in obstetrics – can’t intubate/can’t oxygenate algorithm

New difficult intubation guidelines in obstetrics - can't intubate/can't oxygenate algorithm http://t.co/Qymdx2EmcC pic.twitter.com/8UHTVSYDa5— Anaesthesia (@Anaes_Journal) October 12, 2015 //platform.twitter.com/widgets.js  
prehospitalmed.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

VividTrac – Nasal Intubation, Difficult Airway

In memory of Dr John Hinds  
prehospitalmed.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

Awake Intubation

More training is needed on awake intubation. This method may be most optimal when there is known or suspected difficulty with mask ventilation or tracheal intubation.  
medscape.com
over 4 years ago
Sinaiem dark
0
0

is-it-time-to-end-routine-c-spine-immobilization

Cervical spine immobilization is a routine precaution taken by both EMS and Emergency Departments for patient who experience oftentimes minimal trauma. The purpose of maintaining immobilization of the cervical spine with suspected bony injury is to prevent secondary injury.  Other than patient discomfort, maintaining cervical spine immobilization is oftentimes resource-heavy and can complicate essential procedures and tasks such as intubation or central line insertion. So why are we doing it?  
sinaiem.org
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

Respiratory tract infection associated with seizures

A two year old girl presented to her local hospital with breathing difficulties. She was diagnosed with virus induced wheeze. On day one of admission she deteriorated and developed respiratory failure, which required ventilatory support and transfer to our paediatric intensive care unit. Figure 1⇓ shows her chest radiograph on arrival. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) panel performed on respiratory secretions identified a micro-organism. She was successfully extubated to nasal cannula oxygen two days later and transferred to a paediatric ward. Four hours after transfer she had a prolonged tonic-clonic convulsion. Owing to profound respiratory depression after two doses of lorazepam she required re-intubation and transfer back to the paediatric intensive care unit.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

Respiratory tract infection associated with seizures

A two year old girl presented to her local hospital with breathing difficulties. She was diagnosed with virus induced wheeze. On day one of admission she deteriorated and developed respiratory failure, which required ventilatory support and transfer to our paediatric intensive care unit. Figure 1⇓ shows her chest radiograph on arrival. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) panel performed on respiratory secretions identified a micro-organism. She was successfully extubated to nasal cannula oxygen two days later and transferred to a paediatric ward. Four hours after transfer she had a prolonged tonic-clonic convulsion. Owing to profound respiratory depression after two doses of lorazepam she required re-intubation and transfer back to the paediatric intensive care unit.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

Respiratory tract infection associated with seizures

A two year old girl presented to her local hospital with breathing difficulties. She was diagnosed with virus induced wheeze. On day one of admission she deteriorated and developed respiratory failure, which required ventilatory support and transfer to our paediatric intensive care unit. Figure 1⇓ shows her chest radiograph on arrival. A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) panel performed on respiratory secretions identified a micro-organism. She was successfully extubated to nasal cannula oxygen two days later and transferred to a paediatric ward. Four hours after transfer she had a prolonged tonic-clonic convulsion. Owing to profound respiratory depression after two doses of lorazepam she required re-intubation and transfer back to the paediatric intensive care unit.  
feeds.bmj.com
over 4 years ago
Logo h rgb
0
0

high-flow-o2-in-the-er

High Flow O2 Thanks to Dr. Htaik for the write-up of this post Thanks to Dr. Gaieski for heading our new blog-series which focuses on critical care Questions In hypoxemic respiratory failure, is intubation required in more than 10% of cases? Does NIPPV deliver significantly higher FIO2 than high-flow nasal cannula? Is High-Flow Nasal Cannula…  
tjuhem.wordpress.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

Fiberoptic Awake Oral Intubation | Resus Review

Tutorial and procedure steps for performing fiberoptic awake oral intubation including equipment, preparation, and medications.  
charlesbruen.wpengine.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
0

Nasotracheal Intubation | Resus Review

Simple introduction to successful and safe nasotracheal intubations, including tips for performing them awake and mastering the procedure.  
charlesbruen.wpengine.com
over 4 years ago
Preview
0
7

Critical Care

Endotracheal intubation is frequently complicated by laryngeal edema, which may present as postextubation stridor or respiratory difficulty or both. Ultimately, postextubation laryngeal edema may result in respiratory failure with subsequent reintubation. Risk factors for postextubation laryngeal edema include female gender, large tube size, and prolonged intubation. Although patients at low risk for postextubation respiratory insufficiency due to laryngeal edema can be identified by the cuff leak test or laryngeal ultrasound, no reliable test for the identification of high-risk patients is currently available. If applied in a timely manner, intravenous or nebulized corticosteroids can prevent postextubation laryngeal edema; however, the inability to identify high-risk patients prevents the targeted pretreatment of these patients. Therefore, the decision to start corticosteroids should be made on an individual basis and on the basis of the outcome of the cuff leak test and additional risk factors. The preferential treatment of postextubation laryngeal edema consists of intravenous or nebulized corticosteroids combined with nebulized epinephrine, although no data on the optimal treatment algorithm are available. In the presence of respiratory failure, reintubation should be performed without delay. Application of noninvasive ventilation or inhalation of a helium/oxygen mixture is not indicated since it does not improve outcome and increases the delay to intubation.  
ccforum.com
over 4 years ago