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InvestigativeTechniques

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AEA - American Evaluation Association : Home

American Evaluation Association  
eval.org
about 3 years ago
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13
294

Coronary Angioplasty and Stenting

Coronary angioplasty and stenting is done to open up blood vessels in the heart. You may need the procedure after a heart attack, or if your vessels are clog...  
youtube.com
about 3 years ago
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4
171

Cardiac Catheterization

Cardiac catheterization procedure can diagnose a variety of heart conditions and determine the health of your coronary arteries, heart valves, and heart muscle.  
youtube.com
about 3 years ago
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8

Hairs, feathers and scales have a lot in common

The potential evolutionary link between hairs in mammals, feathers in birds and scales in reptiles has been debated for decades. Today, researchers demonstrate that all these skin appendages are homologous. On the basis of analyses of embryonic development, the biologists evidenced molecular and micro-anatomical signatures that are identical between hairs, feathers and scales at their early developmental stages. These observations indicate that the three structures evolved from their common reptilian ancestor.  
sciencedaily.com
about 3 years ago
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Don't Recycle Bad EHR Measures Into MACRA, AMA Tells Feds

The AMA and other medical societies say that if CMS wants to get EHR interoperability right, it needs to move beyond what its meaningful use program requires.  
medscape.com
about 3 years ago
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Post-Intubation Complications in ED Setting - emdocs

We are masters of the airway, often managing life-threatening scenarios and conditions. However, the patient who decompensates around the time of intubation, or directly after the procedure, can be frightening. What can you do to mimize these events?  
emdocs.net
about 3 years ago
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7

Saturday at ASCO: Liquid Biopsy Matches Tissue Biopsy

The results from a 'liquid biopsy' measuring circulating tumor DNA in blood matched up to these from conventional tissue biopsies.  
medscape.com
about 3 years ago
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0
8

Early Evaluation for Head Tilt in Asymmetrical Epiblepharon

Children with asymmetrical epiblepharon should be evaluated for head tilt as early as possible so that facial asymmetry might be prevented, according to researchers from Korea.  
medscape.com
about 3 years ago
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0
7

Smartphone-Based Genetic Testing Identifies Hospital Pathogens

A new smartphone-based genetic testing device can rapidly identify pathogens that cause healthcare-associated infections.  
medscape.com
about 3 years ago
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Laboratory Diagnosis of Tuberculous Meningitis

Currently, there's no established lab test to diagnose early tuberculous meningitis, the most severe form of TB. In this study, the authors tested a new approach using CSF interferon-gamma detection.  
medscape.com
about 3 years ago
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SHOULD THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH REMOVE ITS BAN ON ARTIFICIAL METHODS OF FAMILY PLANNING?

This is a question faced by many catholic health care providers throughout the world. The Roman Catholic Church officially opposes any artificial method of family planning. When Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio became the new leader of the Roman Catholic Church (Church from here on) in February 2013 as Pope Francis, catholics all over the world were encouraged by the idea that they might see some changes in the teachings of the Church as it relates to many issues pertaining to the “family”. These issues include divorce, remarriage, homosexuality, family planning and a number of other topics. I want to focus in this discussion on the longstanding opposition by the Church to the use of artificial methods of family planning (contraception). This ban on contraception affects catholic medical practitioners on a daily basis and this includes, family doctors, RNs, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and any medical care giver involved with counseling clients about methods for planning their families and implementing the chosen methods. As we know, the Church allows only “natural methods” of family planning, the so called “fertility awareness methods”. That is just fine for motivated and somewhat educated couples, with some access to medical care and teaching; also this approach works best if the women has regular menstrual cycles. Medical advances have made these methods more sophisticated and precise than the original method, based on just counting the days of the menstrual cycle and abstaining from intercourse on the so called fertile days. Under ideal circumstances these natural methods have a high success and low failure rate, equal or better than some artificial methods. And many couples who use it are very satisfied with it, even though they still require a considerable amount of effort. Under less than ideal circumstances however, these natural methods have a high and unacceptable failure rate. This is true in our own country but especially in developing countries and areas (like refugee camps) where people live in squalor, lack food and most basic living needs, have no or inadequate medical care, and women often have very irregular or absent menstrual cycles, so that the natural methods of family planning become utterly impractical. Yet the Catholic Church insists that only these natural methods are acceptable. The hope for a change in this official position of the Church has been fostered by the observation that Pope Francis seemed to be willing to listen and has made a number conciliatory remarks on issues like women’s equality, divorced and remarried couples and homosexuality, while continuing to accept only the natural methods of family planning. Then came the most recent publication by Pope Francis, “Amoris Laetitia” (The Joy of Love). This is a beautifully written document about issues related to the family, in which the Pope makes again conciliatory remarks about a number of issues, but reaffirms the position of the Church in regards to family planning. No artificial methods are condoned. This seems to close the door on this issue, at least for the foreseeable future. What a pity and what a missed opportunity for the Pope to bring the teachings of the Church as it pertains to contraception in line with the thinking and practice of the 21st century. It is well known, and adequate statistics are available to show that worldwide a large percentage of catholics are ignoring the teaching of the church as it pertains to family planning and availing themselves of contraception to plan their families. On a personal note I have spoken to a number of priests and asked them about my practice as a catholic obstetrician and gynecologist of prescribing and implementing artificial contraception for my catholic clients. Some of them have told me to following my conscience and continue what I am doing. That is of course just fine for me, but in the overall picture of things, it makes no sense. If rules, regulation, and laws are such that a vast majority of people, including those in position of authority are ignoring them, is it then not time for the leadership to seriously review and hopefully modify the rules? That, to me and to many of my catholic colleagues and patients, seems only logical. In that sense the recent publication by Pope Francis is certainly most disappointing. In this regard the recent publication from the Wiingaards Institute for Catholic Research might be of interest: http://www.catholicsandcontraception.com William J. LeMaire MD Emeritus Professor Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Miami, Florida  
DR William LeMaire
about 3 years ago
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Don’t cause unnecessary distress! P.R.E.D.I.C.T before your paediatric procedure #WILTW

For those working with acutely ill and injured children there aren’t many more important things we can do than relieve distress and pain. Sadly though there are times when procedures need to be performed in Emergency Departments which will not be completely pain free.  
rolobotrambles.com
about 3 years ago
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MRI Perfusion, Viability Scans Work With MRI-Conditional Pacemakers

Prospective data show that MR diagnostic quality images are possible in most patients with MR-conditional pacemakers, but the jury is still out on whether this improves outcomes.  
medscape.com
about 3 years ago
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Noninvasive Ventilation Delivered by Helmet Cuts Intubation Rates in ARDS

Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) delivered by helmet reduces endotracheal intubation rates in adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), compared with NIV delivered by facemask, according to a new trial.  
medscape.com
about 3 years ago
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ARTIFICIAL CONTRACEPTION STILL BANNED BY THE CATHOLIC CHURCH.

WHAT A PITTY AND A MISSED OPPORTUNITY. POPE FRANCIS’ REAFFIRMS IN “AMORIS LAETITIA” THE BAN ON CONTRACEPTION BY THE CATHOLIC CHURCH. On April 8th Vatican released the long awaited publication by Pope Francis “Amoris Laetitia” (The Joy of Love). This very lengthy and comprehensive document deals with the many issues facing the family. There are many beautiful passages in it about a large number of issues. Many catholics around the world will be pleased to read about the Pope’s (Church’s) much more open and progressive views of such issues as divorce and homosexuality amongst many other issues. But in fact nothing has changed. In this document the Pope reaffirms the position of the Roman Catholic Church regarding the use of artificial methods of contraception. This statement is certainly very disappointing to many catholics and to catholic medical care givers. Only natural methods of family planning, the so called “fertility awareness methods” are condoned by the Catholic Church. That is just fine for motivated and somewhat educated couples, with some access to medical care and teaching; also this approach works best if the women has regular menstrual cycles. Medical advances have made these methods more sophisticated and precise than the original method, based on just counting the days of the menstrual cycle and abstaining from intercourse on the so called fertile days. Under ideal circumstances these natural methods have a high success and low failure rate, equal or better than some artificial methods. And many couples who use it are very satisfied with it, even though they still require a considerable amount of effort. Under less than ideal circumstances however, these natural methods have a high and unacceptable failure rate. This is true in our own country but especially in developing countries and areas (like refugee camps) where people live in squalor, lack food and most basic living needs, have no or inadequate medical care, and women often have very irregular or absent menstrual cycles, so that the natural methods of family planning become utterly impractical. Yet the Catholic Church insists that only these natural methods are acceptable. During his return last year from a visit to the Philippines, Pope Francis made the somewhat unexpected statement that catholic families would do well to limit their families to a manageable size. A most welcome recommendation indeed! However, during the same interview Pope Francis again reaffirmed the opposition by the Church to any form of artificial birth control. How then are the people living under less than ideal circumstances as I described above, supposed to adhere to the Pope’s recommendations to limit the seize of their family? The natural methods have a high failure rate under these conditions. It seems to me that the Pope (and the Catholic Church) can not have it both ways and place these people before a very unfair dilemma. Either adhere to the Church’s teaching and attempt to use the natural methods of family planning that are allowed, but in doing so risk an unwanted pregnancy, or ignore the teaching and use the many artificial methods available and in doing so be marginalized by the Church to which they belong. A very large number of professed catholics world-wide are choosing the latter option, and that includes me. Some of the catholic priests, with whom I have discussed this issue will tell me to ignore the Church’s teaching, follow my conscience, and continue with my practice of prescribing artificial methods of contraception and carrying out permanent sterilization procedures. (I am a gynecologist). That is of course just fine for me, but in the overall picture of things, it makes no sense. If rules, regulation, and laws are such that a vast majority of people, including those in position of authority are ignoring them, is it then not time for the leadership to seriously review and hopefully modify the rules? That, to me and to many of my catholic colleagues and patients, seems only logical. In that sense the recent publication by Pope Francis is certainly most disappointing. William J. LeMaire MD Emeritus Professor Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology University of Miami Miller School of Medicine  
DR William LeMaire
about 3 years ago
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1
13

WHAT A PITTY! POPE FRANCIS’ REAFFIRMs IN “AMORIS LAETITIA” THE BAN On CONTRACEPTION BY THE CATHOLIC CHURCH.

On April 8th Vatican released the long awaited publication by Pope Francis “Amoris Laetitia” (The Joy of Love). This very lengthy and comprehensive document deals with the many issues facing the family. There are many beautiful passages in it about a large number of issues. Many catholics around the world will be pleased to read about the Pope’s (Church’s) much more open and progressive views of such issues as divorce and homosexuality amongst many other issues. But in fact nothing has changed. In this document the Pope reaffirms the position of the Roman Catholic Church regarding the use of artificial methods of contraception. This statement is certainly very disappointing to many catholics. Only natural methods of family planning, the so called “fertility awareness methods” are condoned by the Catholic Church. That is just fine for motivated and somewhat educated couples, with some access to medical care and teaching; also this approach works best if the women has regular menstrual cycles. Medical advances have made these methods more sophisticated and precise than the original method, based on just counting the days of the menstrual cycle and abstaining from intercourse on the so called fertile days. Under ideal circumstances these natural methods have a high success and low failure rate, equal or better than some artificial methods. And many couples who use it are very satisfied with it, even though they still require a considerable amount of effort. Under less than ideal circumstances however, these natural methods have a high and unacceptable failure rate. This is true in our own country but especially in developing countries and areas (like refugee camps) where people live in squalor, lack food and most basic living needs, have no or inadequate medical care, and women often have very irregular or absent menstrual cycles, so that the natural methods of family planning become utterly impractical. Yet the Catholic Church insists that only these natural methods are acceptable. During his return last year from a visit to the Philippines, Pope Francis made the somewhat unexpected statement that catholic families would do well to limit their families to a manageable size. A most welcome recommendation indeed! However, during the same interview Pope Francis again reaffirmed the opposition by the Church to any form of artificial birth control. How then are the people living under less than ideal circumstances as I described above, supposed to adhere to the Pope’s recommendations to limit the seize of their family? The natural methods have a high failure rate under these conditions. It seems to me that the Pope (and the Catholic Church) can not have it both ways and place these people before a very unfair dilemma. Either adhere to the Church’s teaching and attempt to use the natural methods of family planning that are allowed, but in doing so risk an unwanted pregnancy, or ignore the teaching and use the many artificial methods available and in doing so be marginalized by the Church to which they belong. A very large number of professed catholics world-wide are choosing the latter option, and that includes me. Many of the catholic priests, with whom I have discussed this issue will tell me to ignore the Church’s teaching, follow my conscience, and continue with my practice of prescribing artificial methods of contraception and carrying out permanent sterilization procedures. (I am a gynecologist). That is of course just fine for me, but in the overall picture of things, it makes no sense. If rules, regulation, and laws are such that a vast majority of people, including those in position of authority are ignoring them, is it then not time for the leadership to seriously review and hopefully modify the rules? That, to me and to many of my catholic colleagues and patients, seems only logical. In that sense the recent publication by Pope Francis is certainly most disappointing.  
DR William LeMaire
about 3 years ago
11
0
13

WHAT A PITTY! POPE FRANCIS’ REAFFIRMs IN “AMORIS LAETITIA” THE BAN On CONTRACEPTION BY THE CATHOLIC CHURCH.

On April 8th Vatican released the long awaited publication by Pope Francis “Amoris Laetitia” (The Joy of Love). This very lengthy and comprehensive document deals with the many issues facing the family. There are many beautiful passages in it about a large number of issues. Many catholics around the world will be pleased to read about the Pope’s (Church’s) much more open and progressive views of such issues as divorce and homosexuality amongst many other issues. But in fact nothing has changed. In this document the Pope reaffirms the position of the Roman Catholic Church regarding the use of artificial methods of contraception. This statement is certainly very disappointing to many catholics. Only natural methods of family planning, the so called “fertility awareness methods” are condoned by the Catholic Church. That is just fine for motivated and somewhat educated couples, with some access to medical care and teaching; also this approach works best if the women has regular menstrual cycles. Medical advances have made these methods more sophisticated and precise than the original method, based on just counting the days of the menstrual cycle and abstaining from intercourse on the so called fertile days. Under ideal circumstances these natural methods have a high success and low failure rate, equal or better than some artificial methods. And many couples who use it are very satisfied with it, even though they still require a considerable amount of effort. Under less than ideal circumstances however, these natural methods have a high and unacceptable failure rate. This is true in our own country but especially in developing countries and areas (like refugee camps) where people live in squalor, lack food and most basic living needs, have no or inadequate medical care, and women often have very irregular or absent menstrual cycles, so that the natural methods of family planning become utterly impractical. Yet the Catholic Church insists that only these natural methods are acceptable. During his return last year from a visit to the Philippines, Pope Francis made the somewhat unexpected statement that catholic families would do well to limit their families to a manageable size. A most welcome recommendation indeed! However, during the same interview Pope Francis again reaffirmed the opposition by the Church to any form of artificial birth control. How then are the people living under less than ideal circumstances as I described above, supposed to adhere to the Pope’s recommendations to limit the seize of their family? The natural methods have a high failure rate under these conditions. It seems to me that the Pope (and the Catholic Church) can not have it both ways and place these people before a very unfair dilemma. Either adhere to the Church’s teaching and attempt to use the natural methods of family planning that are allowed, but in doing so risk an unwanted pregnancy, or ignore the teaching and use the many artificial methods available and in doing so be marginalized by the Church to which they belong. A very large number of professed catholics world-wide are choosing the latter option, and that includes me. Many of the catholic priests, with whom I have discussed this issue will tell me to ignore the Church’s teaching, follow my conscience, and continue with my practice of prescribing artificial methods of contraception and carrying out permanent sterilization procedures. (I am a gynecologist). That is of course just fine for me, but in the overall picture of things, it makes no sense. If rules, regulation, and laws are such that a vast majority of people, including those in position of authority are ignoring them, is it then not time for the leadership to seriously review and hopefully modify the rules? That, to me and to many of my catholic colleagues and patients, seems only logical. In that sense the recent publication by Pope Francis is certainly most disappointing.  
DR William LeMaire
about 3 years ago